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Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by big jimmy 91, Jan 28, 2006.

  1. big jimmy 91

    big jimmy 91 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Northwestern Ontario Canada
    I am thinking about picking up a 1989 or so 6.2L diesel blazer, I saw a few months back and would like some input from those that have had experience
    It's an automatic stock as far as I know

    What I need to know is can they be made reliable to start in cold weather?

    Is there a fix for their starter problems?

    They also have glow plug issues?

    Can you just use ether in cold weather without damage?

    Or is there anything else I should know about before picking up a 6.2 diesel?

    I would appreciate any thoughts or advice about these Blazers/Jimmys??

    Right now I am working way out in the bush and need a 4X4 that is reliable to start in temps. as low as -40* F without being plugged in

    So I will be checking this thread on the weekends when I get home , and may not be replying right away

    Thanks
     
  2. dallassnowman

    dallassnowman 1/2 ton status

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    Yes they can be reliable in the winter..Must have good batteries (2) ..must have good starter....must have good glow plugs..must (not) have any fuel leaks.
    If all this is good then you cant go wrong (great mileage..and very reliable)
     
  3. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    at -40 degrees... I think you may be plugging in any gas motor as much as a diesel though. But with the diesel you can idle it half the day with very little fuel consumption compared to a gas rig.

    The 6.2L can be very reliable in cold weather. First get two of the biggest battery's you can fit and replace them both at the same time. Replace all the stock battery cables with min 2 ga wire. Replace the stock glowplugs with quickheats (but carry a couple spares). Would not hurt to set up the glow plugs for full manual control. The stock non-gear reduction starters can be replaced with the newer gear reduction units from the 6.5L trucks for less battery draw and faster starts as well.

    Ether is not recomended for the 6.2L as it can do some pretty bad damage... But I've used it in a pinch very sparingly. Then again, I blew that motor up too :doah:
     
  4. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    you can get additives specifically for fuel to keep it from gelling - ether shouldn't be necessary. you would definitely need the anti-gel stuff for it tho. ;)
     
  5. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I dunno..

    Seems to me ANY motor would be nearly impossible to start at 40 below!..gas,diesel,anything internal combustion is going to not want to fire right up,under those conditions,even with everything in perfect working order..even starting fluid probably doesn't want to burn when its that cold out..:eek1: bbrrrrr!!....

    I'd say not only get the truck in tip-top shape as suggested,but also look into those propane powered engine block heaters like the semi's use..they are sort of a self contained hot water furnace,only dinky..they work well,and don't need any electricity,if plugging in is not an option...you can use the small camping propane bottles on them,or a 20 lb. gas grill bottle..they don't use the propane as fast as you'd think..might save your life in that kind of cold..

    I was tempted to get one for my 6.2,in case it gets frigid again like last year here..we hit 15 and 20 below a few times last winter..my truck always started,but the worst nights I had it plugged in,and parked inside the garage..still didn't start easy,but it did start!...one thing I dislike about the diesel is you can always plug it in at home,and get it started..but drive it to a friends house with no cord or power outlet and part it there overnight,you could be screwed the next morining..

    ..one guy I know hooked one of those propane block heaters up to baseboard heat,and heats his "office" trailer with it!..maybe put a strip of that in your cab too,and get instant heat!..:crazy:
     
  6. afroman006

    afroman006 1/2 ton status

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    Even though we live in ****ing Texas, my roommate installed this nifty little block heater on his truck. Its a tubular shape with 5/8" hose connections, designed to install in the heater core circuit. When you plug it in, it heats and circulates the engine coolant. It was 70 degrees outside when he installed in and when he tested it it melted the paint off itself from getting so hot. I know this doesnt help you at all but I thought it was interesting.
     
  7. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    :haha: :haha: :haha: that made me laugh.
     
  8. maynardogle

    maynardogle 1/2 ton status

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    As I understand it, propane won't vaporize at -40...unless the propane tank itself has a heater. In the old days we used to put a little charcoal grill under the oil pan and just let it smolder all night. That kept the block from getting down below -10 or so.
     
  9. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    now that is an interesting idea! what kinds of things did you have to be careful of - precautions taken?
     
  10. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Fire!!...

    Ya,I've seen contractors put a bale of hay under a balky Cat diesel dozer,and pour some diesel on it,and light a match to it!..it started right up after it burned the hay down to nothing..I guess thats why most diesels use little or no rubber on the fuel lines!..other than the high pressure..so you can BBQ them in cold weather!...:p:

    (I can see the picture now--a gas grill under a 6.2 roasting the oil pan!--"Redneck Block Heater"..:rolleyes: )...

    Most of the guys with propane block heaters make sure to turn them on right after shutting down the motor..this makes it easy to light(yes,propane does not vaporize well below 32 degrees unless butane is added)..it also makes it easy for the heater to keep the block warm,if it was already at operating temparature..I'm not sure the heater COULD warm a stone cold 40 below motor up,even if you could get it lit somehow..:confused: ..
     
  11. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    I don't know if I would feel comfortable having an open flame heater under my engine, mine leaks fuel a bit.
    I would put hot coals though, that is not as dangerous.:eek1:
    IceMan
     
  12. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:
     
  13. maynardogle

    maynardogle 1/2 ton status

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    Yeah...well first time I saw it I thougt the guy was crazy. I grew up in West Virginia and we always had access to coal... We used it outside in a barrel to warm barns and garages and even down in the pit with the water meter to keep the lines from freezing. BTW the little tray of hot coals under the motor only works if the wind isn't blowing.
     
  14. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    now all you need to do is get an enormous rubber boot similar to those you would find on a shock absorber but with a diameter the size of your little bbq, and bam, you've got yourself the perfect little chimney so the wind won't bother you. do that and an open flame, maybe add a big NY strip and an enormous potato wrapped in foil, and not only do you have a diesel motor that will start up with out any problems, but you've got dinner ready for yourself after a long day of hard work. plus it's the safest and most convenient way to do it. ;)
     
  15. maynardogle

    maynardogle 1/2 ton status

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    So... bigjimmy_91...if you're still out there in the great white north...bottom line is .....

    1) we don't have a clue how to start any IC engine at -40...we'd all probly just curl up an die

    2) glow plug are not a real issue.. just upgrade to the latest self limiting models model and maybe a manual switch instead of/in addition to the controller

    3) do the fat battery cables upgrade, buy new batteries every three years...whether it seems you need to or not

    4) starters are not a problem if you don't crank them till they melt...don't by a cheap rebult

    5) do the electric fuel pump upgrade, to make sure you can get cold diesel up the hill to the injector pump...

    That's about it...I think..
     
  16. big jimmy 91

    big jimmy 91 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks everyone for the interesting ideas

    I have seen the pre-heaters on the bush equipment , I have done the fire under the truck method (very scary:eek1: )

    I owned a chev 1/2 ton 305 auto about 8 years ago , it would allways start no problem , no matter the temp. after I switched over to 0-30 synthetic motor oil. It was a lot of money for an oil change but well worth it

    So the best thing to do is get everything in top shape and hope for the best:thumb:
     
  17. kennyw

    kennyw N9PHW Premium Member

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    You can get synthetic oil in the 15W40 rating... possibly thinner too. Just be sure it is rated for a diesel motor before you use it.
     

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