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lug nut help! my 35 flew off while driving!

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Confederate9, Mar 7, 2002.

  1. Confederate9

    Confederate9 1/2 ton status

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    well, yesterday i go driving home from lacrosse practice and at about 20 mph i hear a pop pop, and i go oh [censored], i was slowing down for a light and my front flies up and i see my passenger rear 35 mt/r go rolling down the road, i slam on the brakes, hit the emergancy break and down shifted, after i came to a stop, i got out and looked at it, and my wheel studs [ i think thats what their called] what the lug nuts screw to.... well they had all broken off.
    i need some help on replacing those.
    what do i do, what size do i need for a stock 10bolt
    and also while im at it i want to change my brake shoes, how do i do that also.
    thanks guys, whoa... what a experiance!
     
  2. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    Beat what is left out of the holes after you take the drum off. Put new ones in from the back and tighten them down w/ a open lug nut with the flat side in. You will most likely destroy that lug nut so by extra. If you are gotng to use acorn style on the rest also pick up 1 or 2 of the cheep open ones.

    It is not too easy to describe in words how to do drum brakes. But I’ll give it a shot and others can maybe fill in the blanks. Start out with the right tools. A flair-fitting wrench, return spring tool, and hold down tool. Don’t get the tool that looks like a big pair of pliers with a pointy end and a hooked end. The tools you want are ones that look like a screwdriver with a cup shaped thing on the end, and a tool that looks like a screwdriver or rod with two ends (one end like a really narrow spoon and the other with a small cup with a tab on it). Than take off the drums (don’t shake out the dust), measure the width of the shoes, pull back the dust cover on the wheel cylinders to see if there is any fluid leaking (if there is buy rebuilt ones), and then go to the auto parts store and buy the stuff you need. Bring with the drums and have them measure them for you, and machine if necessary (if they don’t do that call around to find somewhere else to have it done). Where safety glasses for all the rest of the steps. Take everything off of one side only and set it all EXACTLY as it came off. To take off the return springs use the return spring tool cup end, put it over the spring and twist. The tab should catch the end of the spring and pry it off. To take off the hold down springs use the hold down spring tool to push down the hold down spring and twist it 90deg. while holding the nail from the inside of the backing plate. Take the parking brake lever off of the rear shoe (secondary also the shoe with more friction material on it), it is normally held on with an E-clip. Don’t loose the E-clip (they like to fly when taken off and match the driveway perfectly). Now spray the backing plate down with brake cleaner letting all the junk drip down into a plastic tub. Now is the time to replace wheel cylinders if needed (just remove and replace using the flair fitting tool on the line end) now is also a perfect time to replace the axle seal. Now clean each part individually so as not to mix up the parts (different R & L as will as front and rear). Install the parking brake lever on the secondary shoe using the E-clip. Install the spring on the bottom between the two shoes, the toothed wheel and adjuster, and put the shoes on the backing plate. Then install the hold down spring on the primary shoe (the one in front with less friction material), the parking brake link and spring (the bar that connects the parking brake lever and the primary shoe), the adjusting lever, and the hold down spring on the secondary shoe. Next install the stud plate (thing that keeps the shoes from sliding out off the stud at the top of the backing plate), than the return springs with the other end of the return spring tool. Put the return spring in the place in the shoe where it should go then put the spoon part over where the other end should go with the return spring around it, and pry the spring onto the stud/link where it goes. If you forget or mix up the parts, that is why you only did one side at a time (you can look at the other side which is just a mirror of the side you are working on). Than adjust the adjuster until there is just a slight amount of drag when turning the drum. Now remove the drum, do the other side, and bleed the brakes if the cylinders were replaced. The most helpful thing about the repair manuals is the pictures (or you could take a pic with your Polaroid/digital camera but who says that the person that did it last did it right)

    Did I miss anything?
     
  3. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    BTW: One reason your lugs might have broken off is because of improper torque...might also want to buy a torque wrench (and use it...speaking from experience).
     
  4. StonerK5

    StonerK5 1/2 ton status

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    Get a Haynes manual for the fixes, new drum and lugs and you will be good to go, not that diffucult.
    Just thank, who ever it is that you thank, that the tire did not hit anyone else!!
    My friends Corvette just lost a rear wheel on the highway and it hit someone driving in the other direction. That person was in the hospital for like a week.
    Man talk about not being able to sleep.

    Glad you nor anyone else got hurt!!

    Chris
     
  5. txbluethunder

    txbluethunder 1/2 ton status

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    not to butt in but, is there anywhere to by stronger grade lugs or are the stock ones good enough?
     
  6. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    You have 2 options
    1)ARP (search on google for more info)
    2)Upgrade to 1/2" (search here fo more info)
     
  7. Chris Demartini

    Chris Demartini 1/2 ton status

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    <font color=blue>Beg, borrow, or steal a drum brake tool like Triaged described. Also do one side at a time so if you get stuck, you can look at the other side to see where everything goes
     
  8. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    stock ones are fine if they are torqued properly and checked every once in a while
     
  9. StonerK5

    StonerK5 1/2 ton status

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    Got me thinkin now...what is the correct torque?
    35's with 10 bolt axle
     
  10. BigTex

    BigTex 1/2 ton status

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    In my opinion, the stock lug nuts are not strong enough for 35"+ tires. I have snapped a few brand new ones by just hand-tightening them. I got them at the local Oreilly's.
     

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