Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Mill and Lathe...

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by bigbluesuburban, May 2, 2007.

  1. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Posts:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Constant State of Perpetual Anger
    Now how to do I run them... I guess I got a lot of learnin' to do.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Oh yeah, $800 :D
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2007
  2. 55Willy

    55Willy 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    Jun 2, 2001
    Posts:
    9,946
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Keizer, Or
    I that what you were picking up when i saw you head past work with a sunbelt trailer??
     
  3. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Posts:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Constant State of Perpetual Anger
    yes it is...

    go look at the original post again. The lathe didn't show up the first time.
     
  4. mofugly13

    mofugly13 1 ton bucket of rust Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2002
    Posts:
    2,813
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Is that a South Bend 9"? When I first got my lathe, I didn't know how to run it, so I fooled with all the levers and figured everything out, then I took a toolbit that came with it, and proceeded to reduce various brass pipe nipples to piles of brass chips and shavings. For the lathe, I highly recommend "How to Run a Lathe" by South Bend Lathe Works, and especially recommend "The Amateur's Lathe" by L.H. Sparey.

    Did your lathe come with change gears for threading? If not, you can pick up all kinds of tooling on ebay. Looks like you got a palmgren milling attachment, that you wont need because you have a mill, and right about now you're thinking of selling it to me....Check out www.lathes.co.uk for info on your lathe, as well as links to machining sites.
     
  5. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Posts:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Constant State of Perpetual Anger
    Mo... THANKS for the recommendation on the two books. I will find them on Ebay or Amazon this evening.

    I do not know what a palmgren milling attachment is so if you see one then I guess I got one. I would be interested in selling it assuming that you are not leading down a bad path where I will need it later.

    And lets not forget... you already got my drill press!!! :D :haha:

    Honestly though, now I need to find a solid old drill press to make it all complete.
     
  6. rdn2blazer

    rdn2blazer 1 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Posts:
    16,486
    Likes Received:
    1,191
    Location:
    So Cal.
    WARNING, PLEASE take the time to learn how to run these machines BEFORE you just go for it. Im sure your aware just how bad you can get hurt with these. people have been killed running machining equipment. check out some of the machinist chat web sites and like mofugly13 said get some books and read.

    I dont want to here about you losing a hand or eye or much worse from being careless with these machines. I can tell you some gruesome stories of bad injuries I have seen, also guys I have worked with have told me about how they got hurt or things they have seen. just be careful.
     
  7. mofugly13

    mofugly13 1 ton bucket of rust Premium Member

    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2002
    Posts:
    2,813
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Good point. Not to mention learning how to operate them properly so you don't screw the machine itself up, like running the cairrage into the spinning chuck, or engaging the back gear to remove chucks if you have a threaded spindle. Safety is #1 though. I once left the chuck key in the chuck, and coming back later to turn her on and send the key whizzing past my head. Don't ever leave the chuck key in the chuck when your hands are not on it. Who knows what kind of damage would have been done had it hit me? That was a quick lesson learned. And NO GLOVES. If your machine gets ahold of your glove, it will pull the rest of your hand in!

    All I need is a mill to round me out. I bet the drill press could do some light milling. But a bridgeport would be nice. I got my lathe off craigslist for $400 and the drill press was free, so I figure if I bide my time, I'll come across that "screaming" deal on a mill. It took me four years to find the drillpress deal...
     
  8. rdn2blazer

    rdn2blazer 1 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Posts:
    16,486
    Likes Received:
    1,191
    Location:
    So Cal.
    the guy that is the grind shop leadman at my last shop told me a story about how he had been at this one shop years ago, was pretty new there and he was grinding a part that was a heavy part, had to install it with a tool post hand crane.

    the lead guy he was working under told him to use a carbide live center. the part had a shallow center, only about 1/4 deep drilled into the end, he told his boss he did'nt think it would hold up but the boss said no way it will be fine. so he got to grinding the part. well the carbide center broke and the part flew out and hit him right in the face between the eyes. it fractured his skull. broke the bones around his eye sockets.

    I know this to be true because I also worked with his son and brother also at the last shop and thay told me about it too. the reconstructive surgery and how long he was in the hospital. that is some crazy s**t right there.

    I have personally seen on 2 different ocasions, one was 3 finger tips and bone cut off in a table router, and 2 finger tips crushed off in a 10 ton C frame press. I picked the part up that crushed off the finger tips, the part was cupped so the tips were not totally crushed flat. they were reattached but he lost about 3/8 worth of bone from his ring and pinky.

    I saw it happen and it was like crushing a pencil in a vise, the bones were all fethered or splayed out from being crushed. sure can have lots of fun with industrial equipment. I never have had nothing more then a minor cut. I want to keep my 10 best friends....my fingers. :D


    I was told a story from old timer that said he saw a guy get chopped up in huge vertical boring maching. have herd of arms crushed off in drop presses, all kinds of crazy stuff.
     
  9. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Posts:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Constant State of Perpetual Anger
    Dude, are you kidding me. Of course I am going to be careful. But let me also remind you that for every 'lost a finger' story there are thousands or 'nothing ever happened' stories that don't ever get told. As for learning to use it before I use it. Now how exactly do I do that? I appreciate your concern for my safety but I grew up without bicycle helmets, anti-lock brakes, and many of the other modern 'safety' devices. I didn't get this far in life without some common sense. And if I do lose a finger, or an eye, or end up dead. I won't be crying about it blaming others for my own ignorance.

    Seriously, I really do appreciate the concern on your part. I will be careful, I always am. But I am not going to limit my desire to build cool stuff just cause there is a bit of danger in the equation. If everyone errored on the side of caution ALL of the major advances in the world would never have been realized.

    If you have some suggestion for good reading, or good technique, or specific things to watch out for (chuck key left in the lathe/drill) I am all about getting those and benefiting from other experience.
     
  10. rdn2blazer

    rdn2blazer 1 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Posts:
    16,486
    Likes Received:
    1,191
    Location:
    So Cal.


    sounds like you have it all figured out so have fun.
     
  11. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Posts:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Constant State of Perpetual Anger
    oh no, far from it. Actually I forgot I wrote this. I was having a rough morning and after reading it I see that I was a little bit DEFENSIVE to say the least.

    I am sure that I will end up one finger short, or wearing a patch over my eye one day.

    Hey does amputation count as weight loss?

    Seriously, sorry for the crappy reply to your legitimate concern and advice. Damn I can be a$$ sometimes.
     
  12. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2001
    Posts:
    7,777
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    First off, check out HSM, a forum much like this one but focused on Hobby Machinists. And Chaski (Local friend is Admin, VERY friendly place with great help, but slow moving).

    Then there is PMwhich is much like Pirate used to be, but oriented to professional/serious Machinists, though they have a large Home Shop Machinist crowd as well. The owner in particular doesn't want to have the board start running to the "Cheap Chinese Tooled Machinist" crowd and can get a bit harsh (as can some like minded members) when folks post "What is the best cheap Chinese Mill" or "How can I make my Chinese Mill better". However, like Pirate once was, they have a wealth of info under their much less crusty surface. Just don't ask about your mill there :o, though you will likely receive good help if you ask intelligent milling questions, even if somewhat basic. Like Pirate (used to be) when you first get involved in Rock Crawling, this board is best used for reading/lurking until you get a bit more comfortable. No loss as the HSM board can provide everything you need and more for quite a while.

    Other than that, the books by Guy Lautard are good, as is a book called Machine Shop Trade Secrets. But to get started, pick up an old Machine Shop class book from a used book store, I have one from the 60s that is absolutely fantastic for manual machines. A machinist (tool and die) friend shipped me one he had from long ago and it was invaluable. Best to get one printed before the overwhelming dominance of CNC, which is not a problem since there really hasn't been much new in "manual machining" in some 40 years. At least not in areas a hobby machinist would care.

    And don't get too loose with the amputation jokes, that old lathe is a VERY real risk with the open works, and you would be far, FAR from the first to loose appendages (or worse) in machines like that. As one who has had a leg violently amputated at the knee (and reattached), I can assure you without hesitation that this is something you don't want experience...
     
  13. rdn2blazer

    rdn2blazer 1 ton status Premium Member

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2004
    Posts:
    16,486
    Likes Received:
    1,191
    Location:
    So Cal.

    thanks Russ, could not have said it better myself.

    Bigbluesuburban, apology accepted. we all have those days.
     
  14. bigbluesuburban

    bigbluesuburban 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2006
    Posts:
    1,362
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Constant State of Perpetual Anger
    Amputation jokes are a staple of my twisted little world. But be assured I am no fool when it comes to operating carefully. I don't wanna lose nothin' I might use later.

    I really do take heed of what everyone is saying... no joke!!! And all the tech/web/reading information is GREAT.

    I think that in every hobby/career there are risks and we either choose to take them on or live forever in a small padded room. I am extremely excited to get a chance to learn something new, and my investment is minimum at this point.

    Oh I have to ask about the whole 'Chinese' mill thing... Is my mill Chinese? Cause I can't tell, they all look alike... (Uh there is a wrong wrong joke in there somewhere) Seriously though, how do you know it's Chinese? I thought it was a decent unit when I bought it, but of course I applied my half thimble of knowledge to my selection process. I am quite the expert you know. It was all based on the "I found it, I can afford it, I want THAT" selection and deliberation process... highly scientific and empirical ya know.

    I can wait to make things flat and round!!!
     
  15. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2001
    Posts:
    7,777
    Likes Received:
    11
    Location:
    Phoenix, AZ
    It is clearly an Rong-Fu RF30(?) clone. They are sold by HF, Enco, and most other budget tool suppliers, typically priced from around $700 at HF up to $2000 for a new RF. The RF itself is generally the best of the lot, with HF and Homier being at the bottom, but in the end, they are all just round column mill/drills. Decent for starter tools and hobby work, but you'll quickly find it's limits in automotive work if you want to do much more than slot brackets. It's bigest shortcoming (for most people) is the round column because you can't raise and lower the head without loosing x-y location. There are attempts at minimizing this problem, but it all amounts to bad-aid and work-around type efforts. Next step up is a similarly designed "Square Column" mill, and some of these can be quite decent. Both are examples of what's known as a "Bench Top Bed Mill". About equal with the square column bench mills, you'll find small Knee Mills like the Clausing and Rockwell with tables that move up and down on a "knee". Above those, you'll find the larger knee mills like Bridgeport, Tree, and Lagoon (I have a Bridgeport 2J 9x42). Next up in capability, but going down in flexibility, are the larger Vert/Horiz mills like often made by Cincinnati and others. Then there are cross-overs and break-outs like the Deckle series, and bench top Horizontals, etc.

    There is also a Yahoo group dedicated to the RF round column mills, probably worth joining as you can lear a lot there.
     

Share This Page