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More lug stud questions...

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by nyyef, Sep 13, 2000.

  1. nyyef

    nyyef 1/2 ton status

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    you know the center hole on your rims, arent they supposed to fit snug around that center 'thing' on the axle flange (12 bolt), so that it takes some of the load rather than all the load on the lug studs?
    i am asking this because the hole on the rim leaves about 1/8" gap all around. i am planning on putting a little ring in the gap to help distribute the load, please comment.

    Knife.
    knife.coloradok5.com
     
  2. stephan van leir

    stephan van leir 1/2 ton status

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    No, your wheel studs carry the load. The design that you are thinking of is called hubcentric. Ford uses that type wheel on the superduty line. Be glad you don`t have them, because the wheels are rare, and costly.
     
  3. nyyef

    nyyef 1/2 ton status

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    the center thing is there. it is only about 3 and something inches in diameter, and about 1/8" high, and it sits in the center of the flange (center of the 6 bolts).
    but your saying, that the studs do carry the load.


    Knife.
    knife.coloradok5.com
     
  4. Eagle86K5

    Eagle86K5 1/2 ton status

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    Mr. Van Leir is correct.....[​IMG]
     
  5. Executioner

    Executioner 1/2 ton status

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    Hum, are you sure(Fact) that the lug studs carry all the load ?
    In the 70's the stock steel wheels(and the rally wheels) fit tight, all most a press fit over the rear axle flange hub.
    What was this for ?
    I would say it was engineered into the design process, not just coincedent.
     
  6. Espen88k5

    Espen88k5 1/2 ton status

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  7. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Nyyef, Regardless of who's right about the studs carrying all the load, I really don't think a 1/8" ring will do anything but fill in the gap. Would you really want four little rings carrying the load of your truck? I also think it would be pretty hard to go out and find 1/8" rings with the same exact inside diameter you need to go over your hubs.

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  8. Executioner

    Executioner 1/2 ton status

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    Your right about some things. If you don't know something is not true(Fact) then why repeat it, If your not sure
    say so, it is better to not pass on mis-information, then to try to help with it.
    Sorry ..........
     
  9. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    i think that what Eagle is referring to is that Nyyef has a gap in-between his wheel hub center and the actual hub. I fthey are not touching, which mine are not either, then the studs are crrying the weight. I know my wheels sit on the lugs and they actually sit off center until I tighten down the lug nuts and then they move into place.

    Some styles, such as older cars, have the hub centric style which the wheel actually rides on the hubs, but I dont think the blazers have this. At least mine doesn't.

    Mike [​IMG]
    See <font color=green>EMMETT</font color=green> -&gt; http://emmett.coloradok5.com
     
  10. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Executioner, Sorry, for what? It appears that some wheels do place part/all of the load on the hub and some place it just on the studs. So the answer varies from application to application. In this case it appears his wheels do not place any of the load on the hub as there is a 1/8" gap in between the wheel and the hub. It just doesn't make sense that by placing a ring in the gap would take some of the load off of the studs. It sounds pretty Mickey Mouse, BTW if "something is not true" it is called a FALLACY not a FACT, a fact is "something that IS known to be true".[​IMG]


    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  11. blazer72

    blazer72 1/2 ton status

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    Gee some wheels fit loos on the hub center some fit tite, and some have a gap! I guess if I go with the FACTS then my blazer is sitting on air since the hubs do not in FACT fit tite to the wheel there is in Fact a 1/4 inch or so gap there and since the FACT is that it is a 1972 blazer (the papers say so) and it it has been stated as fact that the studs do not suport it the the 1/4 inch air gap must be doing so in FACT!!!

    I understand the jeep thing I drive a BLAZER!!

    Ken
     
  12. nyyef

    nyyef 1/2 ton status

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    talldog, the ring would be a press fit on the hub. and fit snug inside the center hole of the wheel. as mentined by someone above, my stock wheels were also an almost perfect snug fit. which would clearly mean that the wheel took some of the load, and this was stock. so i think the intention is NOT to have the studs carry all the load. the ring i am going to make will be machined to a pefect fit. even if it doesnt do anything the studs are still there doing there job. i only raised this up because of my almost accident and then comparing my rims to stock and other aftermarket rims. i have found different things, no gap, small gap, large gap...etc.

    Knife.
    knife.coloradok5.com
     
  13. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Knife,
    I've actually still been think about this topic and it'd be nice if we had a straight answer from maybe a wheel manafacturer or somebody of that nature. I understand the idea of having the ring machined and then pressed in. I still have a question for ya. I know your rim leaves a small gap, so I imagin that to get the gap perfectly "round" you'd tighten the lug nuts first before you press the ring in, right? So at this point the load of your rig is already being carried by the studs, so I really don't think that when you press the ring in it will lessen some of the load off the studs. If you were to swap to wheels that were "pressed" on, then I imagin that the load would be eased off the studs. I'm no wheel expert, I'm just trying to rationalize the plan. You might consider calling some wheel makers and asking them before you spend too much time making the rings. Let me know if you find anything out.[​IMG]

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  14. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Knife,
    I finally got the answer on this whole topic. I called up American Racing Wheels and I asked them if the load of a vehicle rides on the hub or studs depending on the diameter of the center bore. They told me that the wheel load is ALWAYS carried by the studs, regardless of whether or not the rim is snug around the hub or not. Rims that are tight around the hub are called hub-centric, and the purpose of a rim being hub-centric is to center the wheel via the center hole, not to provide load bearing. Wheels that leave a gap are lug centric, meaning the tightening of the lug nuts will center the wheel.
    Here's a link for these definitions, goto Wheel Terminology
    http://www.americanracing.com/ar2000/faqs/#
    you can also call them up 800-321-5489, take it easy.

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  15. blazer72

    blazer72 1/2 ton status

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    on some wheels the center centers the wheel not the studs. After the lugnut's are torked down the center does notheing the studs have the loade though the clamping force. This would be the case with or with out contact with the hub.

    I understand the jeep thing I drive a BLAZER!!

    Ken
     
  16. Blazer1970

    Blazer1970 1/2 ton status

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    I think, as has been discussed in a thread on 6 lug 14 bolt FF axles, that Toyota wheels, which also use a 6 on 5 1/2" pattern, have a bigger center hole. Aftermarket wheel manufacturers make their wheels with the bigger center hole, so that they will fit Chevys or Toyotas (also Nissan, and maybe others). No big deal, except that you need to be a little more careful to tighten your lug nuts in the proper sequence so that you do not get the wheel bolted on crooked, which can happen. I have had Chevy wheels that were siezed on to the rear axle shaft so tight that I could not get them off. I threaded a bolt through the tapped hole that is in the wheel to retain the center cap, and used it to push the wheel off the axle. If the tapped hole wasn't there, it would have been a real PITA. That makes me remember one cool thing about Land Cruisers, they put a couple of tapped holes through the brake drums, for just exactly that purpose. That is really handy.

    Tim

    1970 Blazer CST 4X4 350 SM465 NP205
    1987 Suburban 4X4 350
    1988 Chevy Pickup 4X4 350
     
  17. nyyef

    nyyef 1/2 ton status

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    talldog, thanks for the info. well, since i know have an answer from the people who actually make wheels, i will forget about the rings. you guys should appreciate the fact you guys live in the the same country that builds all the aftermarket stuff.....all it takes is a 800 number.

    thanks y'all for the input.

    Knife.
    knife.coloradok5.com
     
  18. stephan van leir

    stephan van leir 1/2 ton status

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    Ok guys. I contacted Stockton wheel (800-395-9437), and I asked about this. They said that GM c/k trucks were NOT produced as hud centric axels. They said that GM wheels are high quaility with a tolerance of .010, and that is why your stockers fit so tightly. Go look at some cheapo wagon wheels. You will see that they are stamped to fit many different appilcations like Jeep, Ford, and Scout 5 lugers. They also said that your stocker are 4 to 5 times as stronger than those $40 white wagon wheels. So if you like you can take this as fact or just more misinformation. By the way, a grade 8 wheel stud in the 1/2" size is rated to 9350lbs static shear strenght, and 6100lbs dynamic shear. Now multiply this by 6 or even 8. Now take into acount that your wheels are rated to 3500lbs MAX. You do the math!
    Sorry if any of this is redundant.
     
  19. Executioner

    Executioner 1/2 ton status

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    Hum. looks like the Facts are slowly being reaserched!
    wow what a concept !
     

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