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More on glow plugs (theory)

Discussion in '1982-Present GM Diesel' started by tRustyK5, Dec 10, 2002.

  1. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    I've been reading up on the different glow plug controller set-ups (I'm going manual control) and noticed that the glow plugs will also cycle a little while the motor is running /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif

    What exactly is the point of that? Obviously with a manual glow controller they would never cycle when the motor is running...so how important is it for them to do this and why do they? Is it an emissions deal when the motor is cold to help burn the fuel more completely?

    Rene
     
  2. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    The glow plugs will cycle when the temp is not the right temp, the reason is, fuel economy, engine life, and emissions of course.
    I used the manual, and I didn't notice the difference when driving it, once it starts, I let it idle for 1 or 2 min and then drive slowly for the first few miles, it works for me.
     
  3. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

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    It's called "after-glow." It's only to help keep the motor running when it's really cold and to cut down on the smoke caused by unburned fuel. It's not really necessary most of the time. I have a home made auto controller on my truck, and it doesn't have any after-glow. Only when it's really cold out do I need to manually glow for a few seconds after it's started to help keep it running. If I don't, it will sputter and die sometimes. It just makes the engine run smoother for the first few moments of running.

    If you don't after glow, it will puff white smoke for a few moments. The after glow helps cut this down.

    The factory after glow period usually only cycles the plugs for about a minute at most. It does depend on the ambient temp as well.

    Casey
     
  4. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Thanks for the info. Our climate is pretty mild here so it probably won't be too big a deal here. The coldest it ever gets in down to the 20's once in a while.

    Does keeping the motor plugged in help at all?

    Rene
     
  5. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    Oh yes, if you can keep it plugged in, you should be fine. But if not, in the 20's you might need to cycle it manually after you start it maybe a couple of seconds every 30 seconds 2- 3 times, after that you should be OK.
     
  6. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Thanks again!!

    Rene
     
  7. arveetek

    arveetek 1/2 ton status

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    I usually plug my truck in if it gets below 40. It doesn't really need it to start, but it sure starts much easier. With it plugged in, it starts at 32 degrees like it would if it was 100 degrees, just a quick blip of the starter makes it fire up. Plus, the heater is warm and ready to go.

    If I don't plug it in, it gets hard to start below 32. It will fire, stall, fire, stall, fire and then finally take off. I can tell it's much harder on the batteries, glow plugs, starter, etc.
     
  8. Tybee

    Tybee 1/2 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Does keeping the motor plugged in help at all?


    [/ QUOTE ]
    Makes all the difference in the world. Before I was able to plug in my truck, it would start then stop and it took a couple times doing this before it would stay running. Now in 20 degree weather it starts right up and stays running. I dont have a manual glow plug switch though.
     
  9. OFFRDK5

    OFFRDK5 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Does keeping the motor plugged in help at all?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Yes it does help and it helps alot. Less wear and tear on everything. Just remember what Glade plugins say "Plug it in, Plug it in!" /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  10. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    LOL...now I'll be humming that little tune every time I plug it in. /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

    Rene
     
  11. calcide

    calcide 1/2 ton status

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    I haven't plugged in my block heater yet this winter, and the truck has always fired up within the first second of cranking. The overnight temps here have been getting below zero F, too.

    I had some cold starting problems last winter, but a manual GP setup and a new set of batteries have fixed it.
     

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