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More than you ever wanted to know about balloons

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by 75-K5, Apr 7, 2007.

  1. 75-K5

    75-K5 3/4 ton status

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    I was searching Google to find out an approximate psi measurement of a balloon bursting and came across this site.

    Apparently the sound of a balloon popping is caused by the latex breaking the sound barrier :eek1: (lots of jokes to be made about that one)

    So, if you have 1-2 hours to spare, have a read:

    http://www.balloonhq.com/faq/howpop.htm

    P.S. Anyone know the answer to my original question?
     
  2. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    link doesn't work.

    very interesting about breaking the sound barrier.

    i'd suspect the answer to your question would be entirely dependent on the thickness/strength of the material used.
     
  3. 75-K5

    75-K5 3/4 ton status

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    Oops, I deleted the l in html:

    http://www.balloonhq.com/faq/howpop.html

    Yeah I knew that would be the case, just wondered if I could find a formula somewhere. I need to use the # in a speech and wanted something close to accurate so it didn't sound like i was pulling it out my b-hole. :pimp:
     
  4. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    this website has yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, strain graphs for many different polymers. only problem is they don't list the units. i suspect, tho, that since this is a UK website, it's metric - so yield and ultimate tensile strength would be in MPa (megapascal). i suspect you need the info related to UTS. ;) i can convert units for youif you want, if you pick a material.

    if the pressure vessel is very thin, as in the case of a balloon, the thickness won't be included in the equation.
     
  5. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    interesting
     
  6. 75-K5

    75-K5 3/4 ton status

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    So if the thickness and elasticity of the balloon wouldn't be factored in, could I just use the old PV=nRT formula from high school chem? Crap, I'll have to look up the constants though, and I think I just ditched my textbook :doah:

    Edit: found it 8.3143 m3·Pa·K-1·mol-1
     
  7. TSGB

    TSGB 1 ton status

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    I think I just vomited a textbook. :doah:
     
  8. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

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    :haha::haha::haha:
     
  9. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    no, the elasticity will be necessary - just not the thickness. thin walled pressure vessels are pretty simple. i'll pull out my mechanics of materials book tonite and look it up for you.
     

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