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Most powerful lights I can get?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by sled_dog, Mar 14, 2003.

  1. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    My friend wants a set of lights for his brush gaurd on his 2001 Ford F250 and he wants the most powerful ones he can get. He needs somewhere around a 7.5" light and wants chrome round ones. People I have talked to seem to feel KC Daylighters are the brightest but he thinks he wants brighter yet. He actually want slike 1.5million candle watt lights but I don't think we will find those.
     
  2. 89K1500Chevy

    89K1500Chevy 1/2 ton status

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    Ummm Yeah id have to go wiht the new HID Daylighters but they are $1000.00 for a set Or some Aircraft landing lights and the police heliocopters got them ones that metal paint off a car if it gets within like what 50ft? yeah thatd be cool check www.kchilites.com and the gallery of trucks with them might see a truck thats on this site.. /forums/images/graemlins/truck.gif /forums/images/graemlins/usaflag.gif www.zombieoffroading.8m.net
     
  3. Blazinaire

    Blazinaire 1/2 ton status

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    ProComp has 8'' round 130 watt lights available in chrome for pretty cheap. I couldn't tell you in scientific terms how bright they are, but THEY ARE BRIGHT!!! You might want to ask Steve Fox how much he can get them for (or if he can get them?) I'm sure he'll give you a good deal.
     
  4. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    Lightforce.
    A lot of racers use them and haven't heard anything bad about them yet.
     
  5. bablazer73

    bablazer73 1/2 ton status

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    if he will go with the larger square lights, the Dick Cepeck super off roaders are 210 watts. 100 bucks each.
     
  6. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Well first this is a open ended question. You need to get an education on performance lighting.
    There are five main styles of lights. One light is not going to do it all.
    Pensil beam: LONG distance narrow beam. Good for high speed running. The problem is they are so focused that unless the light is dirrectly pointed at something your not going to see it. For a 4x4 it's a waste. If it points at a hill then all you see is the hill in a very small area. These are for distance and vehicles running 50-100mph. These are almost always run with a second set of lights in racing. The beam is so focused you only see what is directly infront of you. It will hardly light up the next lane or the side of the road. These are for LONG straight roads at speed.

    Euro beam: Good distance but a wider beam. Good for use on long streches of hwy or desert running. Will blow any head light highbeam away. Not as focused so it will light up a 4 lane road pretty good where a pencil is only going to light the lane your in. Guranteed to dim auto dim headlights at about a mile away.

    Flood/cornering: This is a good light for a 4x4 on tight twisty, hilly trails. Lots of light in a wide area including up so if your approching a hill you will light it up better. Not a lot of distance but more then enough for typical trails.

    Driving/city: this is a light that can be used in addition to a low beam. these are ment to mount low to light a wide flat area. Helps with cornering and lighting objects on the side of the road It can throw a beam as far as a stock high beam but the low mounting location causes ground objects to prevent a lot of travel.
    mounted high and straight out it does good for twisty trails without a lot of hills. Don't want to use with the low beams on the road if these are mounted high. The wide pattern would run people off the road. This is the tyipical light you would see in the parts stores. Hella 550's etc.
    I run a set of Bosch driving (the same ones you would see on volvo white semi's) on my truck and they do a pretty good job on the trail mounted headlight high. The flat beam is not so bad on the guy's in front of you unless it catches on of their mirrors. I had them so I used them. I would have gone for a flood if I were buying but the flood would have been more bothersome to people you follow so would have to be more carful about when they are on.
    These work pretty good when mounted low for fog. The flat pattern undercuts the fog and doesn't glare back at you so bad. It is esentially the same pattern as a "Fog" but with more distance and white. The yellow "fog" lenses tend not to glare as bad in the fog but they cut down the distance as well.

    Fog: Low flat patten usualy with a colored lens. They are ment to be mounted low to help prevent glare off the fog. The distance is trimmed down to help with this. Fog basicly bounces the light everywhere. while withought fog these would not light very far ahead the refraction of light caused by fog would let you see better since it's not reflecting back. Fog is water vapor and it acts like billions of little mirrors and redirects the light aimed into it. The goal is to aim the light in such a way that it's not coming back. More power is worse in the fog.

    There are also replacement head lights available. I run a set of Hella H4 Rallye headlights in my Supra. The low beam doesn't bother oncoming drivers but the Highbeam is like a Eurobeam and much better then the conventional head lights in both Low and high. I have the not so legal varity but they do sell a set with a trimmed down highbeam that are legal.

    Now there are new light technologys out with more candle power bulbs. This includes HID and Xenon. Really same patterns just a brighter bulb. Also costs a lot more. A set of conventional Ralley 4,000 Euro beams will set you back about $240. A seto of HID Rallye 4,000 are close to $1,000.

    I like Hella. I have a seto of Rallye 1,000 Euro beams that I will be putting on my Burb and wire them to work with the high beams. They would be a waste on my 4x4 and due to their size and the over grown trails I deal with I would likely destroy them. I also run with groups of trucks when off road and unless I was the lead truck I would not be able to run them.
    These are great mounted up high but most states it is not legal to run a light above the headlights on the hwy. They are supose to be covered when on the hwy. On a Burb at headlight level they will be legal and usefull.

    When you see a desert race truck, FIA Rallye car etc with a bunch of HUGE lights it's usualy a combination of patterns. They will have a set of floods for the tiwsties and either a seto of pencil or euro beams depending on the course and speeds. Sometimes they will run all three.
    Here is a good section at Hella's site that explains all the beam patterns plus some special combination beam patterns. Nice illistrations.

    Hella Rallye 4,000's
    Hella's main US site
    www.hellausa.com
     
  7. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Hella HID's.

    Saw the first prototype pair at the SEMA show several years ago. From 30 feet away the light beam of one was HOT on my chest. Word was Robbie Gordon made them pull them out of the display one evening and took them out on a part of the old 400 course. Supposedly they had a hard time getting them back, he wanted to keep them.

    KC Daylighter sealed beam bulbs are basically a 12 volt version of the small aircraft landing light.Their sealed beam lights appear to be brighter than their halogen bulbed lights. Aircraft use higher voltages than autos and the bulbs have to be designed to operate on what ever voltage or they will fry in a short time.

    Watts consumed is not a good indicator of how bright a light is. With tungsten element type bulbs there is a point of dimishing returns. That point appears to be in the 120-130 watt range. Much beyond that point and the bulb life is extremely short.
     
  8. 70~K5

    70~K5 1/2 ton status

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    Grimmy I hear ya. 20 years ago I ran Cibie's on my ralley car. 4 Super Oscars from left to right a fog mounted at a 45* angle to the left, a driving (like what they call a euro now) a pencil, and then another fog at a 45* angle to the right. The fogs would light up all the way around a switch back turn and the driving would light up 4 lanes ahead and the pencil was for long distances. I ran them with just 55 watt bulbs and never felt I needed more. The lights were mounted with the bottom of the light at bumper level on a lowered '69 Mustang. Then I also had Cibie headlights in all 4 positions too. All these lights were run thru relays so they got good voltage all the time. Wish I could still get Cibie lights they were one of the best made. Really like the lead crystal lenses. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     

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