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Moving Radiator to rear....What kind of Pipe??

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by yeild2me, Feb 8, 2003.

  1. yeild2me

    yeild2me 1/2 ton status

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    Since my new Hybrid will have the radiator in the bed, I need to figure out how to get the coolant from the engine to the the rear and back. I think I will just use Aluminized exhaust pipe because of its resistrance to corrosion, but are my other options??

    What diamator? Will my stock Water pump be enough??

    thanks rob
     
  2. jarheadk5

    jarheadk5 1/2 ton status

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    Assuming you'll be using SOME regular rad hose, I'd take a new piece of whatever size hose you're gonna use to the shop where you'll get the pipe. See what size pipe fits snugly into the hose, and use that size. I'd use 2 clamps at each hose-pipe joint, and remember to NOT tighten them too much, or you'll crease the pipe and create leaks.
     
  3. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    A guy in our club recently moved the radiator to his bed on his 350 powered Toyota. He had an exhaust shop bend up some exhaust tubing to run to the bed and hasn't had any problems regarding the water pump.
     
  4. bigmack

    bigmack 1/2 ton status

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    Same here, one of my friends took his truck to the local muffler joint and had them bend 2" (I think) exhaust pipe for his setup. He still used the stock water pump.
     
  5. jeffro

    jeffro 1/2 ton status

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    Break the bank and use copper tubing. Aluminized pipe will erode away in a year or two. Probably worse than plain steel because of the electro-magnetic properties of coolant flow and varying temperatures.
     
  6. Storm Trooper

    Storm Trooper 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Depending on what size you are going to run, I would use some of the new plastic tubing on the market. I know that this stuff is mainly for home heating but if you could find it in a large enough size, it would be the best.
    I use a product called Kitec. It is plastic with a aluminum core, then more plastic on the inside. The fittings don't leak and you can bend it and it will hold it's shape.
    Here is there web site Kitec
    The problem with steel is that it <font color="red"> will </font color> rust from the inside out, aluminized is better but will also die. Copper is good but the raod salt etc. will likely work on it too (turn green). There maybe other products out there that will work great but I would do a little more checking before I threw something at it.
    If you do want to see some Kitec, get a hold of them and find out who in your area has some. Maybe someone has some larger tube left over and will sell you a chunk. I think you will like it and it comes in Chevy Orange. just my $.02
     
  7. yeild2me

    yeild2me 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks guys....I am still researching this.

    Rob
     
  8. RLBstein

    RLBstein 1/2 ton status

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    I was wondering if relocating your radiator to the back and using really long hose would keep your engine from fully warming up. Especially in Fayetteville, NC where it gets real cold, it would seem like driving around in a truck that would never warm up. The pipes would drop the temp considerably being exposed wouldnt they?
     
  9. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    I would use aluminum tubing. I would also have the ends beaded so the rubber rad. hose will not slip off. Look for my post on POR about tubing bead rollers.
     
  10. blk87K5

    blk87K5 1/2 ton status

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    Could you not use PVC? Guaranteed not to rust or corrode. It would look ghetto though.
     
  11. yeild2me

    yeild2me 1/2 ton status

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    Good point....it doesnt really get THAT cold here, and as hot as the summers are, that would make up for it. I suppose with a properly operating thermostat, kepping it warm wouldnt be that big of a problem. Plus, it also isnt my dedicated trans back and forth to work.

    As far as PVC goes, we nixed it because its vulnerability on the trail.

    I will probably end up going with the aluminized exaust pipe. I am guessing I can get 2-3 years out of it as long as I keep my coolant fresh. I know that my old 64 chevy truck had a steel pipe that had 2 rubber hoses on the end of it. It didnt leak the whole time I owned it (3 years) and it was far from new when I got it.


    Rob
     
  12. chevyracing

    chevyracing 1/2 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    Break the bank and use copper tubing. Aluminized pipe will erode away in a year or two. Probably worse than plain steel because of the electro-magnetic properties of coolant flow and varying temperatures.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    that's why you go to a semi truck parts house and buy the coolant additive used in semis, that prevents electralicys.

    John
     
  13. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    PVC and CPVC will both 'collapse' over time from the hose clamps and heat. The first engine dyno had some CPVC in the hot water exit plumbing and we were forever tightening the clamps. When that dyno was finally torn down we had reduced the ID by about 1/3.
    Nal-Cool is the stuff you want. Might have the spelling wrong.
     

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