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Necessary to redo ALL the brake lines?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by OneInTheSun, Oct 26, 2002.

  1. OneInTheSun

    OneInTheSun 1/2 ton status

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    So my front-driver's side hard brake line decided to blow up (right where it goes through the frame). Luckily I avoided a collision or two. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    That spot looks like it's particularly susceptable to corrosion. So my question is: Can I get away with just replacing the proportioning valve-to-caliper section, or should I run all new lines (from master cylinder on out)?
    The rest of the lines aren't new but they look OK. Of course, the spot that busted looked OK too. /forums/images/graemlins/rolleyes.gif
    Safety is top priority, but I don't feel like running all new line if it's not needed. Any good ways of inspecting them aside from the "Yup, looks good" method?

    Bonus question: What's the purpose of the spirals in the line at the MC?
     
  2. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    I think I would get the tubing, a bender, and some line and start replacing it all if that happened to mine! /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif It isn't a fun job, but the lines aren't very expensive. If there is moisture in your brake fluid, it could be corroding the lines from the inside. I don't know of any way to detect that. /forums/images/graemlins/frown.gif

    The spirals in the lines coming from the master cylinder allow for the body to move in relation to the frame and not stress those lines. The spirals need to be there. /forums/images/graemlins/cool.gif
     
  3. driney

    driney 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    If you decide to replace the lines, I learned a little trick that might be useful. I had to make some bends that were close to the fitting on the end of the line and also some tight radius bends that I wasn't able to use my tubing bender on. I wrapped the line with one layer of small guage electric fence wire, with the wraps tight against one another. I could then carefully form the bends by hand with no kinking. The wire is galvanized high tensile steel maybe the size of 14 guage or smaller.
     
  4. MudNurI

    MudNurI 1/2 ton status

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    OHHHHH how I agree! I lost my brakes a few weeks back, and was just going to fix the 1 rear line....thought about it, and figured if 1 has gone, chances are another is on the way out. All of them will be done, front to rear, side to side..

    Brandy
     
  5. DieselDan

    DieselDan 1/2 ton status

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    Last year I was driving to work in my Isuzu diesel P'up; aka "the Rust Bucket Special". Traffic did a recreational stop. I jumped on the pedal and the rear brakes locked as I slid into the ass of a Neon in front of me.

    Well I blew a brake line and, luckly for me, the Neon suffered no damage. The rusty bumper on the P'up folded like a piece of tin-foil. I was checking the Neon bumper and the lady driver says "Oh it's just a scratch, don't worry about it." "How's your car?"

    "Mine's just fine" I said /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. JIM88K5

    JIM88K5 1/2 ton status

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  7. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Brake lines rust from the instide out a LOT and it's from lack of mainatance. Brake fluid is supose to be changed about every two years. Pro brake shops usualy include Bleeding on any major brake job and that's why.
    Brake fluid will absorb moisture. The moistue will then cause the fluid to become acidic. The mointure also loweres the boling point of the fluid. The end result is rusted hard lines, rotten rubber lines and very prone to fade brakes.
    If you rotted out a line that bad I would seriously concider replacing at least the lower lines. My understanding is the moisture tends to collect in the low points of the systems (oil floats on water principle). I would also think about replacing the rubber lines. Brakes are just not something you get cheap on and cut corners.
    There are several companies that make a complete pre bent hardline kit. The price is not unreasonable on those kits. Inline tube that was posted is one of these companies and seems to have a good product.
     
  8. OneInTheSun

    OneInTheSun 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks - All good advice. /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif

    I'm going to redo them all. I was just feeling lazier than usual yesterday.
     

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