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New custom tool

Discussion in 'The Tool Shed' started by BadDog, Apr 21, 2006.

  1. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    I owe a friend a favor (or several really), and he needed a tool to transfer existing holes in a c-channel frame to the opposite side after boxing it for a Cummins transplant. Since I am trying to get acquainted with my new mill and lathe, I offered to make him a tool to fit in the existing hole(s), center a long/aircraft 1/4" drill, and locate it accurately on the far side. Pretty easy at the simplest level, until you start thinking about cases where the frame is not flat, or is tapered to the center rather than parallel with the vehicle center line, or varied in distance to far wall, or different diameters, and so on.

    This is what I came up with. In these pics you can see the final result as well as the original stock used to produce the tool.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    The locating plate is a 3/16 triangle that has 3 thumb screws at each corner. If the frame (or whatever) is flat in the relevant area, you can just clamp the plate on and call it done. If not, you can adjust the 3 thumb screws so that it straddles any interference or changes the angle to perpendicular to the vehicle axis even when the frame is not (3 points define a plane and all that).

    A 1/4" drill that is over 6” long is not very stable on the far side, and there is no center punch to help start it, so the “guide tube” is 1/2” x 1/8" wall DOM. The “tip” is tapered 45* to make sure it gets close at the important point regardless of angle or obstructions. The OD will locate the guide tube in a 1/2" hole, and was turned under to 0.490 to avoid clearance issues when inserting the tool. The ID was reamed to 0.251 to provide slight clearance for a 1/4" nominal drill (dimensionally it’s smaller than 0.250, don’t recall exact, but it clears). And there is a slot milled in the side of the guide tube to keep the locking screw in the locating collar from gouging the guide tube causing it to hang in the bore. This also keeps the guide tube from spinning in the collar.

    The locating collar is made from 1” solid bar stock cut just over 1” long. This was faced on both ends to clean up and guarantee perpendicular to the sides and a step was turned at 0.400 radius x 0.200 deep on one end. The OD was cleaned up and the ID was bored then reamed to 0.499 to provide a smooth sliding fit for the guide tube at 0.490. Clearance should not be an issue since the locating collar bore is almost 1” long. This was drilled and tapped for a 1/4-20 thumb screw and then pressed into a 0.004 undersize hole bored (on the lathe with the 4 jaw chuck) in the triangular base plate. The collar is located “close” into the point of the right triangle formed by the base plate so that it can be oriented so as to fit up close to any obstructions. Once it was pressed fully into place (and I tweaked the base plate to remove the resulting bow) the collar projected about 0.020 from the bottom (as planned – see 0.200 step above relative to 0.188 nominal plate thickness). The plate was then finish ground on the belt sander to bring it all in flush and flat.

    I hate fooling with a bunch of tools when doing stuff like this, so it’s designed for “tool less” adjustments at all points. I also have to make a couple of “bushings” that will fit on the guide tube to locate it in the center of holes larger than 1/2”. These will look sort of like an old top hat (think Abe Lincoln) with the ID slip fit on the 1/2 guide tube and the OD a slip fit for the larger hole. Then the hat brim will be fairly thin and keep the bushing from falling through to the inside of the boxed frame. The 3 corner screws can then be used to keep the base plate correctly oriented, and should probably be used in all cases to help eliminate errors due to irregularities in the rather old frame rail plate.

    I still have far to go, but I’m really enjoying the lathe and mill. Just wish I had a better/larger lathe...
     
  2. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    sweet, looks cool
     
  3. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Oh, and I'm planning on getting some 1/4" drill rod to make a punch to run through the guide tube too. That will help make sure the drill starts clean on the far wall...
     
  4. mofugly13

    mofugly13 1 ton bucket of rust Premium Member

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    Awesome, man. Designed and built by you, that's gotta be satisfying. Nice job.
     
  5. mosesburb

    mosesburb For Rent Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    My gawd man, that is sexy!! I think that should just about do the job. I guess with this you are forcing me to actually do a little more on the Big Orange Yard Ornament than just hosing off the neighbor's dog whiz!!

    BTW folks, all I mentioned was a bolt with a hole bored down the center of it and this is what I get!! :pimp1:

    :bow: :bow:
     

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