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NP203 Driving Questions

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by skink4president, Apr 7, 2005.

  1. skink4president

    skink4president Registered Member

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    Location:
    orlando
    To all you non-modified NP203 daily drivers:

    For regular highway and street operation, what gear do you use for the transfer case? I've always had mine in (N)eutral but noticed yesterday that the sunvisor instructions say it should be in (H)igh.

    Also, what's the difference between "High lock" and "High" (or "Low lock" and "Low" for that matter)? I was always under the impression that the 203 only had three gears H, N and L.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Robert79K5

    Robert79K5 1/2 ton status

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    Location:
    Douglasville Georgia
    okay first you are not in neutral. You are probably in high. If you were in neutral you wouldnt be going anywhere as it completely disconnects the t-case.

    The difference between the lock and regular positions is that in lock position your front and rear acle are basically slaved to one another, meaning that the front wheels will have to turn as fast as the rears which is just fine off road. The regular positions allow the differeftial in the t-case to do its thing and let the front and rear wheels spin independantly of one another while still both receiving power. This is what keeps you from binding up your drivetrain while on pavement or other high traction surfaces.

    if you had it on one of the non lock positions and had either the front or rear axle off of the ground all of the power would be sent to the tires in the air and they would spin just like an open differential in your axle.
    Use regular high for street driving. Either of the low ranges will multiply your torque and cut your speed by 2.
     

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