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oil burner burning... kerosene??

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by K5dreamer, Oct 19, 2006.

  1. K5dreamer

    K5dreamer 1/2 ton status

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    not that im planning on doing this but i was researching the M1008 and M1009 trucks, and i saw a hp rating of 150 when runing number 2 diesel in the 6.2L engine in those trucks, and then a 135hp rating when run on kerosene......

    can i run the military diesel truck on regular kerosene if i had to??? what kind of negative effects would that have on the engine???
     
  2. Hossbaby50

    Hossbaby50 3/4 ton status

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    Sure, a diesel will run on lots of things beside straight #2 diesel.

    Diesel #1 & #2
    Kerosene #1 & #2
    JP-5 & 8
    oil
    biodiesel
    Jet A & A-1

    You can run kerosene but I wouldn't advise using it for very long. there is very little lube in it and it is hard on IP parts which aren't cheap.

    Harley
     
  3. 85mudblazin

    85mudblazin 1/2 ton status

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    Tranny fluid works good also. Just have to filter it down to 3 or so microns.
     
  4. jdemaris

    jdemaris Registered Member

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    Kerosene is thinner, has less energy, has less lubricostiy, weighs less pounds per gallon, provides worse fuel mileage, less power, and will shorten the life-span of the fuel injection pump if used a lot. Where I live - in central New York, it is standard procedure to mix our fuel with 50% kerosene in the winter (for off road equipment). For on-road - fuel is already "winter-mixed" at the pump.
    The fuel-injection pump used in the 6.2 and 6.5 diesels - is a rotary "distributor" type pump. Subsequently, it needs good lubrication in the distributor-head or will have a short life-span. The company that makes the pump, Stanadyne-Roosamaster, offers special extra-hard internal parts - called their "Artic Package" for use in very cold regions where kerosene is used all the time.
    In-line type injection pumps handle thin fuel much better - but you don't usually find them used on light-duty road vehicles (except for a few Isuzus and Mercedes).
     
  5. dremu

    dremu Officious Thread Derailer Premium Member

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    I knew the M35's (deuces) and bigger trucks were "multifuel", run on diesel, kerosene, bat guano, whatever ... didn't know you could do that with the little ones.

    Thought the big trucks had a kit, some kind of add-on hardware to run multifuel ... extra filter, maybe, or a luber, then?

    Besides the lubrication issues, are there other reasons to run or not run alternate fuel in a diesel?

    -- A
     
  6. 4by4bygod

    4by4bygod 1/2 ton status

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    Any alternative fuel that is alcohol based (oxydiesel / e - diesel ) will have lubricity isses as noted. the reason why is because the fuel is inherently "dry" to begin with, and the alcohol will "strip out" any petroleum based lube additive you dump in there.

    Other issues include lower thermal energy resulting in lower mileage, and limited availability equalling higher cost.

    also alcohol blend fuels LOVE moisture, so your stuff rots from the inside out, and the more volatile ( lighter) the fuel, the more apt you are to have hard start problems in the hot weather.. this is even an issue with ULSD fuel, which is a #2 fuel refined into a #1.

    As for tranny fluid, not a good idea for fuel.. the EP additives are metallic in nature, so you'll be making nasty deposits in your engine, and metallic emissions are also bad. I know, some guy knows some guy who ran tranny fluid foerver and " never had a problem", but they probably never tore down their engine or did oil analysis to see what was really going on, either.

    As for biodiesel, you've got low thermal energy, gelling in the colder weather, inconsistent manufacturing, limited shelf life, and the propensity to turn into a nice goo in the ring - land area.

    Combustion temps tend to limit the effectivness and bring out the drawbacks of any alternative fuel.. just 'cause the engine is running, doesn't mean it's running at its most efficient.

    One last thing about kerosene... if you still want to run it, be sure to fill up a jerry can and take it home to fill up.. they don't charge normal fuel tax on it, so if you pump it directly...

    Tom
     
  7. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    yup ...

    Pumps here that sell Kerosene say "Not to be used as a motor fuel" right on the pump!..because of the non taxable status!--I've been warned not to fill my 6.2 up there,after I got caught pumping 5 gallons in one day right after I bought the truck--(I never knew it was a federal offense!:doah: )...I figured it would help clean the injectors,we dumped a few gallons in our loader at the junkyard once in a while,because it rarely got used long enough...it always seemed to run better afterwards....

    The Diesel engine was originally designed to run on peanut oil!..Rudolph Diesel,the creator of the first diesel,wanted to have a source of fuel farmers could grow and make themselves...anyone read his life story??--I read he died mysteriously not long after he invented the diesel,and showed how it could run on most any kind of oil,vegetable OR petroleum!--must have been the same guys who made the 100 mpg carbs inventors dissapear not that long ago...:thinking: ..guess if you invent anything that does NOT use petroleum,you are in line for asassination...:doah:
     
  8. jdemaris

    jdemaris Registered Member

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    When Rudolph Diesel submitted his first papers on the "radiant-heat" engine, ca. 1890s - I don't think he was worried about a petroleum substitute. As I understand it, he was looking for a cheaper alternative to the very-expensive steam-power that was dominant at the time. There have been arguments over the years if it was actually his work - that resulted in the Diesel "compression ignition" engine, or the invention of one of his workers. Perhaps that idea was started by a disgruntled descendent of one of his workers? When diesel engines became more common, and raw petroleum was getting refined to make diesel fuel - gasoline was an unwanted by-product. Boy, have things changed.
    There have been many inventions and discoveries throughout history that were credited to people - who may of - or may not have been repsonsible.
    In regard to the 100 MPG carbs - named - as I recall - Pogue Vaporizing Carburetors . . . I built one years ago. It was a death-trap - I'm lucky I didn't kill myself. I did manage to get almost 30 MPG with a 283 powered SS 1964 Chevelle on a flat highway-run, but otherwise it was not driveable.
    On the subject of alternative-fuels, I find the collector-gas idea kind of neat. That is also a very old technology that is beginnig to get used again. Basically, you run a gasoline engine on smoke from a smoldering wood-fire. You can run a gas engine on wood, scrap paper, trash, etc. You still need gas to start the engine and get it warmed up first. Not very practical for a car that you want to start and stop often - but kind of neat idea for gas-driven electric generators and farm tractors where petroleum fuel is scarce. A lot of farming was done with it during WWII in remote areas of the world.
     
  9. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Gasogen!!..

    I knew of a Finnish guy in my hometown who had an airtight barrel stove in the trunk of his 64 Ford Falcon--he used to drive it all over,just to prove GAS wasn't the only fuel a car could run on!..it had a 144 cid 6 banger...

    He started it on gasoline,after the stove was going good,he'd close the valve on the gas line,and it would run on the smoke generated by the stove,which had its air intake nearly closed,so the wood smouldered,rather than burn with a flame..we used to rib him,asking how many miles to the LOG he got!..the guy was an eccentric,but was also very clever..

    His car eventully was taken off the road by the registry of motor vehicles--the local fire department deemed it a "fire hazard",after some motorists following him were showered with sparks from the stove pipe!--it was crudely run over the roof,and into a hole cut in the hood over the carb...He simply took out the stove, and went back to gasoline,and had to get a new inspection sticker..why he bothered using that setup when gas was only 50 cents a gallon is a mystery--I think he just did it to prove it would work!..

    My dad told me the germans used "wood gasogens" to power tanks and other military vehicles after we bombed all their fuel depots durin WW2 also..its pretty cool smoke can run a motor!..:eek1:
     
  10. 71 Blazer

    71 Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    Rudolph Diesel's first engine ran on coal dust and exploded, almost killing him. He moved on to the diesel as a 2nd alternative. I guess it worked out for him. I would love to have a diesel in my Blazer, just can't float the bill.
     

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