Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

oil for tired old engines

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Kodiak, May 7, 2000.

  1. Kodiak

    Kodiak 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2000
    Posts:
    178
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Kodiak Island, Alaska (the emerald isle)
    The engine in my beater blazer is very tired but still works well. When it dies I will drag the blazer to the dump. Is any oil out there better for motors with high miles and lots of wear? Also it needs to be good for cold weather starts.
     
  2. Oil Man

    Oil Man Registered Member

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2000
    Posts:
    27
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Santa Clarita, CA USA
    If your engine is as worn out as you suggest, then don't spend $ on better oils because if your oil and compression rings don't seal very good then you sill get fuel contaminants in your oil no matter what you do. This means that you will need to change your oil more frequently than someone with a fresh engine. Just change your oil with Valvoline about every 2000 to 2500 miles. Sorry to here another K5 is going to the bone yard soon.
    Kevin
     
  3. Mudzer

    Mudzer 1/2 ton status Author

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    3,639
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Missouri
    Contrary to what Kevin said, I think you should give it all shes got. Go with a fully synthetic oil. I started using Valvoline Durablend (synthetic blend) and have seen major changes in the way my old weak motor runs. It now has gusto and quit that small hint of smoke when it is first started after sitting a long time. I would spend the extra money for one oil change just to see if it helps. It didnt take long for my motor to wake up. [​IMG]

    Also another thing, a "fresh" engine will need more frequent oil changes than a broken in engine because of the bearings and rings are still seating to the surfaces on the crank and cylinder walls. Granted an engine with rings that have lost their tension will allow some blow-by but if the motor is not smoking, chances are you have a few miles left and a fully synthetic or synthetic blend oil may help you. Be sure to change the oil the first 2,000 miles then you can probably go 3,000 after that. The reason for this, you will get lots of carbon deposits that are released into the oil because the Synthetic oils will break them down.

    Never use synthetics in a brand new engine. They will not allow proper break in. Good luck.

    <font color=red>Mudzer</font color=red>
    1978/91 K5 Blazer
     
  4. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,816
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Guatemala, Central America
    I really didn't like reading that you're taking your Blazer to the dump. My opinion is that a new GM goodwrench engine for a little over $1K and other necesary repairs will still be cheaper than buying a new car/truck. Even worse if your thinking of spending $20K on a new S-10 Blazer or any other "SUV"! Please save her man[​IMG]!

    <font color=black>//////
    What the heck!...Drive it like gas is $0.50/gal!!!
    </font color=black>[​IMG]
     
  5. delta9blazer

    delta9blazer 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,646
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Northern California, over by 7-11
    an old guy i worked for once said that he used airplane oil in anything with a motor that leaked. he said something about the additives in it help fix small leaks and crap. everytime he saw a spot of oil from a car, lawn mower, whatever, he'd dump in a quart of the oil, and the leak was no more. he swore by it.
    any pilots confirm or deny?

    <font color=purple>delta9blazer</font color=purple>
     

Share This Page