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Oil Pan Torque Specs

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Stylzz, Nov 7, 2002.

  1. Stylzz

    Stylzz Registered Member

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    The directions for the one piece rubber fel pro call for 8 and 16 ft/lbs, or something like that. My torque wrench only goes down to 20 ft/lbs. Should I worry about over torquing or is it ok because the gasket has the little metal piece around the bolt holes.
    Thanks,
    Joe
     
  2. Highlander

    Highlander 1/2 ton status

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    The book says to ( On the small block V8 engines torque the blots to 100 inch lbs. and the nuts to 200 inch lbs. On some 350 engines so equipped, torque the oil pan baffle bolts to 26 ft lbs.)
    Hope this helps

    Eric
     
  3. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Don't ever try going that low with a "standard" torque wrench. The ones I've dealt with are nowhere near accurate at the extreme low end of the scale.

    You obviously need something in inch pounds, or just do it without the wrench. Pretty much same procedure as valve cover bolts.

    The problem with yours probably won't be the gasket, you'd most likely break the bolts off in the block first, which is a bad thing.
     
  4. Rolled

    Rolled 1/2 ton status

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    Over tightening will crush the gasket and create leaks. That is why it has a low torque spec. I just do it by feel.

    Be sure to put a small amount of silicon on both surfaces and spread it around with your finger until it is covered in a thin layer, put some silicon on the threads and get the bolts tight enough to where they can't be turned by hand, maybe 3/4 turn past hand tight. That is just a guess, however.

    If you use a torque wrench, don't be fooled by how loose the bolts will feel. The silicon will hold it all together.
     

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