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Opinions on this.....

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Emmettology 101, Sep 7, 2000.

  1. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    What is everyones opinion on this:

    ith a fully locked front end, what is everyones opinons on only locking in one hub whne the terrain gets slippery?

    I mean, both hubs will be locked in under normal off-road terrain, but when it is very slippery and I need to stay in a straight line I was thinking of only locking in one hub so it would act like an open diff.

    I have hear some say that this cause added stress on some components,but why would it be much different than an open diff.

    I should ok doing this, correct?

    Mike [​IMG]
    See <font color=green>EMMETT</font color=green> -&gt; http://emmett.coloradok5.com
     
  2. An open dif disributes the power to both wheels instead of the one,its a big strain on one axle.

    IF IT AINT BIG IT AINT BAD!!!!!!
     
  3. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    If you're planning on engaging 4wd and locking one of the hubs on ice or some other slippery situation, you'll have more chance of losing traction than remaining in 2wd. This is because when you're turning, the front tires are turning at a higher speed than the rear ones. If you engage 4wd, you'll force them to turn at the same speed. In pavement, usually you're drivelines would bind and even break something, but on a slippery surface with one hub locked, that wheel would lose traction and probably make you lose control.

    The best solution would be to get a NP203 (full-time 4wd) transfer case which I'd dare to say is the best one around[​IMG].

    Good luck and drive carefully.

    <font color=blue>//////
    http://blazer79.coloradok5.com
    </font color=blue>[​IMG]
     
  4. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Blazer79, could you elaborate please on the 203? I'm just trying to enlighten myself, and I'm confused as to what the difference is. I know the 203 is full-time, meaning the axles are always turning, but when the hubs are not locked, then where do the benefits come from? I just don't get it, thanks.[​IMG]

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  5. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    The full-time 203 trucks did not have locking hubs on them. Thats what made them full-time, that and there is a differential inside the T-case for torque biasing front to rear.

    Rene

    [​IMG]
     
  6. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Rusty, I'm getting more confused by the minute. Okay, I understand the differential part, it's intended to eliminate binding, which is great. Now about the hubs, what's the difference between locking and non-locking? I know I sound like a dork, but I've never heard the explanation between the difference, and I haven't been able to figure it out. I apprecaiate the lesson.[​IMG]

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  7. Goose

    Goose 1/2 ton status

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    On a NP203, the engine power is sent to both axles all the time. However, if one starts slipping, it will get all the power, just like an open rear diff. Engage the NP203 in lock and it evenly splits the power like a locker. With a NP203 there are no locking hubs, they are constantly engaged. On a NP205 or part time converted NP203 you put locking hubs in. Then you lock in the hubs when you put in 4x4 which engages the front drive axles to the wheel rotor. NP203 good on slippery surfaces because you have all 4 tires driven, but there is no driveline bind to make the steering weird. NP203 *can* be bad due to wear to front end components, higher fuel consumption. Personally, I think it's a very good system, esp. if its not a daily driver. I have a NP205 in my K5 which is bullet proof, but there is some trade off. Both t-cases are very capable and it's more of personal preference than anything else. I relate it kinda like manual vs. auto tranny. There's good and not-so-good to both. I have a manual tranny because I can always push start it if I need, and I have a NP205 because I don't ever want to worry about the chain (NP205 is all gear driven) stretching and having to replace it. I'm all for something that will outlast my body panels without very much maintenance. With an auto tranny and NP203 there is more convienence as well as more maintenance to keep them trouble free. Ok, now I'm really rambling, but that's also why I found a K5 w/out AC, power windows/locks or anything else. No creature comforts means no excessive maintenence. Simplicity=reliability, which is one of the big draws of an older K5.
    Sorry for rambling and getting off the subject. Hope I answered your question somewhere in there.
     
  8. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Goose, I really appreciate the info. I've got a 75 with a dead 350, TH350, and a 203. The reason I'm so inquisitive is that the 350 is being replaced by a 454, which I know will kill the tranny. I thought about going with a TH400/205, but it's a really hard to find combo. Here are my options, a buddy is giving me a 700R4, and I also found a 700R4/208 for $200. I'm trying to determine which is the best combo for my needs (I do a lot of freeway driving, so the 700 would be nice). So I'm thinking, should I go with the 700R4/208 or try to mate the 203 to the other 700R4? I could also convert the 203 to part-time, but it's probably cheaper to get the 208. What about leaving the 203 as is, mating it to the 700R4, and taking the front driveshaft off, and puting it on when I go off-road? Like I said, I really appreciate this, I'm getting close to decision time and I still haven't made up my mind!!![​IMG]

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  9. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    I think the other guys covered it up really good. So I'll just add this. If you're going with a 454, then there would be no reason to go with a part time NP203, just leave it full time. The mileage difference would be negligible.

    You can mate almost any transfer case to any tranny with an adapter. http://www.advanceadapters.com makes them.

    Now on your question about locking and non-locking hubs, I actually only heard about auto and non-auto locking hubs. Is that what you meant? If so, what this means is that the hubs automatically engage the wheels when they "feel" power from the axles. Sort of like when you're going downhill on a bicycle. Non-auto are the ones you must get down of the Blazer and turn them with your hand for them to engage. Full-time Blazers don't have hubs at all. Just a shiny cap and they are always engaged. That way when you want to engage real 4wd, you just shift the lever and keep on going, no getting dirty.

    If you have more questions, don't be afraid to ask or send a private.

    <font color=blue>//////
    http://blazer79.coloradok5.com
    </font color=blue>[​IMG]
     
  10. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Blazer79, thanks for the extra tidd-bits, and you're right about the 454 making the milage difference neglible. That was what I meant about the hubs. Here's why I'm sooooo confused, and I think you solved the question as to why. I have a 203, I'm sure of that, I identified it by it's physical appearance and the shift pattern. AND I have HUBS up front!!!! I guess then that someone before me has already converted it to part-time, right? So I've got a part-time 203, a TH350 in great shape, two potential 700R4's and a 208, plus one 454. I guess it might come down to $$$$$. It usually does... I'm really grateful for you guys helping me out![​IMG] Before I forget, would the differential in a part-time 203 still work like it's intended to? In which case, that might give it the leg-up!

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  11. jcg

    jcg 1/2 ton status

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    I know guys that unlock one wheel to make tighter turns and it doesn't hurt anything. It does put a lot more stress on the one axle but if your on slippery terrain that shouldn't matter because the wheel should just start spinning before it breaks anything. I can't see anything wrong with it as long as you keep your speed down.

    Joe
    RIT Mini-Baja http://www.rit.edu/~bajawww
    Team Mudnuts http://www.mudnuts.org
     
  12. talldogg

    talldogg 1/2 ton status

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    Joe, I think you're refering to a full-time 203. From the looks of it, mine has been converted. I just can't seem to make up my mind as to what combo I want. There's soooo many factors, I'm actually thinking of just replacing the 350, with a 350! Go figure, aaaahhhhhhhh!

    It's not what you buy, it's what you build!
     
  13. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

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    If your t-case shift pattern is LoLoc-Lo-N-Hi-HiLoc in straight line from front to rear, then it is a NP203.

    I don't think the differential will work in any position while the part-time kit is installed. When you install the part-time kit, you replace a part. (Someone correct me if I'm wrong). If you could get that part back, everything should work as normal.

    If I remember well, there are two kinds of kits. A small one and a big one. With the small one you just replace a small part inside the rear output of the t-case, and the large one replaces the complete rear output. It should depend on which one you've got to make it work back to normal.

    This is what I remember. I could be forgetting something, since I was never really interested in part-time kits.

    Hope this helps.

    <font color=blue>//////
    http://blazer79.coloradok5.com
    </font color=blue>[​IMG]
     

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