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our new, old tig machine...

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by ryoken, Sep 29, 2005.

  1. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    one of our customers hooked us up with a bender and tig machine...

    the tig is water-cooled, but i haven't checked it out yet... its a Hobart Cyber-Tig 300 series.. anyone ever run one of these dinosaurs? friggin weighs about 1000 lbs...

    its the only welding i haven't done and i'll be stoked to learn.. lot of adjustments on this one it looks like...

    the red box is the watercooler, but does anyone know what the box to the right is? arc welding cabability?

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. wildbilzrydn

    wildbilzrydn 1/2 ton status

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    It may be a high- frequency unit for welding aluminum, I don't think its a wire feeder, although it has a knob. What does it say on the box in question?
     
  3. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    no, not a wirefeed... its got i think 4 hookups under that front lid, it flips up.. i just peeked at it and i think it has 2 red and 2 black hookups... kinda hoping its for an arc welding attachment...

    i thought for aluminum you just switched to AC?

    and is watercooled the shiznit? or is it a nuisance and not really nescesary these days...

    need to do some research on TIG...
     
  4. wildbilzrydn

    wildbilzrydn 1/2 ton status

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    I don't know much about tig but I think the watercooling is to cool the torch (The part you hold in your hand). The machine I have used at work is a newer lincoln and it dosent have hi-freq or water cooling, but I have heard of these.

    I have heard from guys who Heli-arc alot that for aluminum you need high-freq. start..... Again i'm gonna guess at this, but I know from trying to weld aluminum in the past, that there is a real big difference in how sharply the transition between solid and "puddle" is between alum and steel. Maybe the High-freq helps with that.

    I know there are guys on this board that can weld circles around me, so I'll bet they'll help you out better than I can.
     
  5. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    yeah, it runs up to the handle... just seemed pretty serious duty to me.. i guess thats a good thing... :D

    for work it will be mostly for stainless and aluminum... need to check out the bender tommorrow...
     
  6. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Water cooled is a very good thing. When you TIG weld for a while the gun can get smokin hot without it. I've had to use a customers machine a few times to do some weld repairs, and it's not water cooled. The gun gets so hot after a while you can barely hold on to it. Our Miller that is water cooled stays nice and cool no matter how long you weld.

    The box could be a hi-freq unit.

    As for aluminum I just turn it to AC, crank it up and go.

    Rene
     
  7. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    Hi freq is for aluminum mostly. Hi freq is what causes the arc to jump. Without it you'll have to scratch start which is okay for steel but for aluminum you will immediately contaminate the tungsten electrode and make bad welds. So, if you have hi freq you can also use it on steel to help keep the tungsten clean and lasting longer.
     
  8. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Assuming that box is a high freq generator, the knob adjusts the AC balance of the high freq. 30-40% is what you usually will want to use on aluminum. If it's really dirty metal you try adjusting for more electrode positive dwell time.

    You can use the hi freq on steel, normally it's only used to start the arc where with aluminum it helps to stabilize it so it runs all of the time.
     
  9. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    as usual, great info guys.... :D

    the boss wants us to get into tower fabrication, which is mostly aluminum.. it'll be nice to learn something new...
     
  10. blazin_blazer

    blazin_blazer 1/2 ton status

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    i have a similar machine

    i love it!! the water resevoir is actually in the base of the machine i have and circulates thru a built in cooler then to the torch

    mine has arc welding capibility built into the front of the machine ..u just plug in ur tweeco connectors to the ground and stinger and turn off the high freq, which is built into the machine also and use it just like a regular welder

    there are different percentage tungstane in your electrodes that you have to learn what percents are for what materials and also when to sharpen the tungstane or ball it as it is called..

    it is the easiest of all the welding procedures to me , if you can fusion weld with a regular oxy/acetylene torch then the tig will be a snap,

    its pretty much the same except you are using an electric torch and plus you have the advantage of a shield gas over your molten puddle which is real easy to see because unlike an arc welder you don't have to learn what is your puddle and what the liquid slag is...i'm serious it is the easiest of all the welding techniques, espescially if you have the foot control where you can actually vary the intensity of your arc with the foot pedal

    sort of like a sewing machine pedal you barely push it and the machine goes real slow and you push it all the way down and the machine goes faster and it is variable inbetween..well if you have the foot pedal for the tig it works the same when your puddle starts to get to hot and want to drop thru you can use the heel of your foot to back off the arc and vice versa when you start you can have it wide open to establish the arc and then ease the pedal back to a cooler setting as you weld

    i promise you, once you try it and see what i mean you will understand it, honestly it is the easiest to weld with, now learning to walk the cup is a different story...you have to learn to rotate your wrist while at the same time raising and lowering ur elbow and you can actually put the ceramic cup on you material and make it walk real precise circles and make your weld look like a row of dimes......i never have understood why people make such a big deal about the tig torch because if you can weld,...just a little practice and you will want to weld everthing with it!

    on aluminum it is a little harder because it gives no warning as to when it is about to fall thru on you, like on carbon or stainless steel you can see the puddle start to dip in about to fall out and make a hole, aluminum won't do this just poof! hole but once you get the hang of it you will be singing the same tune about how easy it is
     
  11. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    awesome post... thanks...

    i was reading up a bit on the aluminum melt point and a few other tidbits tonight... the machine has both foot and hand control...

    being an oldschool bodyguy, i'm pretty proficient with my oxy torchwelding, hopefully that'll help out...

    i'm seeing tube bumpers and cage in my future... :D
     
  12. Robert79K5

    Robert79K5 1/2 ton status

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    Another vote for the awsomeness of water cooled torches.

    I cracked my torch at home when I got fed up with a project and tried to weld with my cobbled-together air cooled home rig like it was the nice millermatic water cooled that I used at work.

    :doah:
     
  13. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    Generally green tipped tungstens are for aluminum and red tipped are for steel. When you get to really thick or thin aluminum then you'll find that a red tip and DC-reverse can work better. Never sharpen the painted end. That's a nube fupah and old timers will berate you for it since now they don't know what alloy the tungsten is.

    I never ball my tungstens for aluminum. Used to be that it was thot that you had to. It will do it on it's own in pretty short time. I grind the end flat and then slightly radius it.

    Some folks say that welding aluminum is difficult b/c you can't see it change color like you can with steel. BS, it does change color, it's just really hard to see. Use a gold plated lense, it will help keep the heat out of your eyes and it makes it easier to see the color change.
    You can not get aluminum too clean. Get a stainless steel bristle wire brush and dedicate it to aluminum use only. Vigoursly brush where you're about to put down a bead. If that brush ever gets used on steel, toss it and kick the guy who did it in the butt. Carbon from either carbon steel bristles or from being used on carbon steel will contaminate the aluminum you're trying to weld and make life much more difficult.

    The biggest problem I had in moving from oxy-fuel to TIG was not pulling the torch back to control temp. If you can learn to use the handle 'throttle' it will work better for vehicle fab work. I didn't and can't and you should see what I have to go thru to get the foot control where I can use it while under/inside a vehicle.
     
  14. blazin_blazer

    blazin_blazer 1/2 ton status

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    awkward positions

    yea when you get in an awkward position the foot control is pretty much useless, so get to be proficient with the hand control as well, i forgot to mention the ss bruch on your aluminum

    as it was stated u can't even use it on carbon then brush your aluminum with it afterwards. he is absolutley correct cleanliness is the key to aluminum

    and anything you weld you should let it fuse and puddle together b4 you ever add any filler rod grind out a nice v and fuse it at the base before you start adding your filler or the crack will work its way back thru
     

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