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paint it yourself question

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by zach78k5, Apr 17, 2001.

  1. zach78k5

    zach78k5 1/2 ton status

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    i am starting into painting my interior. i am just going to use rustoleum and i want to make it look good. how should i go about this. i assume i should sand the orriginal paint or something like that. what grit? i will use primer probably 2 layers to be safe. then the paint, and probably follow up with a clear acrylic. is this about right. is it necessary to completely remove the paint down to metal first or can i just sand it then use primer. any help would be greatly appreciated. thanks.
     
  2. muddin4fun

    muddin4fun 3/4 ton status

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    you just need to rough it up a bit to get the primer to stick. Going all the way down to the metal is better, but not nessesary.

    [​IMG]
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  3. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    You don't need to use a primer unless you sand back to bare metal. Your best bet is to just rough up the factory paint, then spray over it. It already has an excellent grip on the metal underneath.

    <font color=black>HarryH3 - '75 K5</font color=black>
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  4. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    If you aren't really spraying it (as in repainting with a gun) I don't think sanding down to bare metal is advisable, UNLESS the paint is broken through and rusting underneath. Unless you use POR 15 or something similar, I guarantee you will not get paint that is as tough as factory. If you strip to bare metal, when your paint comes off (and it likely will, easily, everytime it is scraped or scratched) at least with factory paint underneath you won't be to bare metal.

    Dorian
    My K5 and Chev/Olds tech/links page: <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html>http://www.dorianyeager.com/index2.html</A>
     
  5. thatK30guy

    thatK30guy 1 ton status Premium Member

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    If none of the sheet metal in the interior is dented or rusted, then you can get by with just knocking the shine down on the original paint. Use anything above 100 grit, generally the finer, the better. If its no hassle, clean out the cab completely. Stip the seats, carpet, etc. out and wet sand the whole interior for a better job. Make sure you have rags, wet/dry vac, etc. on hand to pick up unwanted water. This is cleaner than doing dry sanding which the dry dust can get everywhere. With wet sanding, the water goes one place: down.
     
  6. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    DON'T sand through to the metal if you can help it. The factory finish makes about the best base for new paint that you can get. If you do go to the metal in very large area (definition of "large" varies) then you will need to use an "etching" primer, followed by a sealer, followed by the top-coat paint.

    Unless there is some problem with the factory paint, just scuff it up. The perfect tool for this job is a 3M "Red" Scotch-Bright Pad. You can get a pack of them at any body shop supply store for very little $. They give an ideal finish for new paint and they don't clog up. I usually cut them in half (to get a more manageable size) and use it till it becomes a bit hard to "cut" with (you can tell), then flip it over and do the same on the back side. You should be able to do the inside with no more than 2 (full) sheets. When you are done scuffing it up, go over the entire surface to be painted with “Wax and Grease Remover” before painting to remove skin oil, etc. In fact, now that I think about it, I should also go over it with the W&GR *before* scuffing it IN ADDITION to doing it afterwards. Good luck.

    Bad Dog

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, NP205, D60/C14, 4.56 Locked
    Soon: 4" lift, 40" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     

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