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Painting the Beast

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by TheBlazerKid, Nov 4, 2002.

  1. TheBlazerKid

    TheBlazerKid 1/2 ton status

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    Just pulled teh Blazer into its resting place (i.e. the shop) and took off the moulding and ghetto universal rubber fender flares ( neither of which is going abck on) and began sanding it down. shouldnt be too hard beings theres no rust to fix. Just a few minor dents and scratches. Im thinking about painting it in sections like teh fenders, then doors, one side and so on. any imput on wether this is a good idea from you painters out there. Im thinking that if im concentrating on a small area iw ill be less likely to %$#@ it up. beings this is only my second paint job. paint on my buddys S-10 turned out pretty good tho so i think i can do a fair job. (and I talked him into painting it the same colr as my blazer so I got all his leftovers /forums/images/graemlins/wink.gif hehe.
     
  2. rrent

    rrent 1/2 ton status

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    I'm getting ready to do the same and will be glad to hear if the paint gurus out there think the sectional painting will work. My concerns would be the panels not quite matching - but, I'm not sure why they might not.
     
  3. SHINTON

    SHINTON 1/2 ton status

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    Here is the thoughts of a 'son of a painter', I have been around painting for a while and have seen dad paint a ton of cars.

    Essentially, you can CERTAINLY paint in sections. The biggest issue would be spliting up a panel, for instance the rear panel around the tires into 2 sessions. If you are going to, then you will need to 'blend' the paint together and NOT have a defined line in that panel.

    You could paint the door, front fender, hood, tailgate and rocker panels all separate. When you paint the rear fenders I would blend down on the bottom into the rockers. (Tape off the doors if doing separate.)

    As for different colors, if all the paint is from the same batch that really should not be an issue. However, something to be aware of is humidity differences. If it is really rainy humid you will get some 'foggy' looking paint as the thinner cannot evaporate as well.

    So if you do the door on a really humid day, and the front fender on a really dry day, the door may look like it has some fog in it?

    Final thoughts, dad did hundreds of cars where he blended a new paint job into an old one. (On newer cars that had been wrecked) and that is pretty tough. You essentially blend the old paint job into the new one to mask the difference you will get. You can use the same technique here to blend two different days of painting.

    We are doing the exact same thing to my 72 Jimmy right now, she is in primer where we fixed all the rust, cut out, put in new metal, etc. I will send some pictures soon!

    Sam
     
  4. ntaj*ep

    ntaj*ep 1/2 ton status

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    HAHA! I painted mine in my driveway, in the dark, on a trailer, with spraycans. Do I count as a painter?! /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif
    I've seen some BADA$$ hotrods built by the guy doing my "nice" Blazer and he does a mock up of the body, paints everything seprate, then installs everything on the frame. If he can get some of the cars he has to look so good then it can be done. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif and done well!
     

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