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Patio suggestions?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by laketex, Jul 14, 2004.

  1. laketex

    laketex 3/4 ton status

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    Howdy guys, got a home improvement question for yall.

    The house we are trying to buy is in north Texas. The ONLY problem with this house is a slight drainage problem in the back yard. The house currently has a poured sidewalk that connects to 3 doors exiting to the back yard. This sidewalk sits 36" from the house and sits at the level of the concrete slab for the house, causing water to pool up in the area in the middle. We want to do the proper dirtwork and/or patio to allow water to slope away from our foundation. To compound the problem, there are no gutters on this house at this time. The back yard slopes up from the house at approx 5" per 10' until it reaches a drainage ditch that has been dug out about 40' from the house. The back of the house is in an L-shape with a very complex roof line. What we want is a patio, retaining wall, and proper drainage conditions. Please feel free to add to this confusion or help clear it up, but here are 3 options we are currently researching.

    1. Tear out concrete sidewalk. Pour new concrete patio that butts up to the house slab. Install Gutters.

    2. Tear out concrete sidewalk. Install pavers with a slight curve to add appeal to the backyard. This would look better, but not sure about price comparisons to concrete. Durability in our shifty clay soil is also an issue in my mind.

    3. Tear out concrete sidewalk. Do extensive dirt work to get slope away from house and work the drainage gully further out, perhaps working it into the landscape somehow. Lay down grass, and install a detached patio of some sort later on.

    Please let me know what you think. As stated earlier, I know little to nothing about patios, but I'm willing to learn. Even though it's a bad pic, I'm including the realestate pic as a link so you can kinda see what I have to work with.

    Thanks!

    Bryan

    http://www.virginiacook.com/details.cfm?propID=1538227#
     
  2. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Damn dude, guess you got a raise when you moved back down to Tejas. /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif
     
  3. skratch

    skratch 1/2 ton status

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    Well, first off, very nice place!

    I think I'd tear out the sidewalk and go with a shaped concrete patio that has color and an inlaid pattern.
    I've poured a bunch of those and they usually look really nice.
    I like pavers and all, but there is a lot you can do with concrete. And in the long run it will last better and add more resale value if done correctly.

    If I understood you correctly, it sounds like your yard actually slopes toward the house, causing all the water to run back to you.
    Without extensive dirt work I don't see any other way to get rid of the drainage problem caused by that.
    But I'm sure the gutters wouldn't hurt one bit.

    I'd be more concerened about the drainage around that pole barn though, don't want your tools and toys getting wet!
     
  4. laketex

    laketex 3/4 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Well, first off, very nice place!

    I think I'd tear out the sidewalk and go with a shaped concrete patio that has color and an inlaid pattern.
    I've poured a bunch of those and they usually look really nice.
    I like pavers and all, but there is a lot you can do with concrete. And in the long run it will last better and add more resale value if done correctly.

    If I understood you correctly, it sounds like your yard actually slopes toward the house, causing all the water to run back to you.
    Without extensive dirt work I don't see any other way to get rid of the drainage problem caused by that.
    But I'm sure the gutters wouldn't hurt one bit.

    I'd be more concerened about the drainage around that pole barn though, don't want your tools and toys getting wet!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Thanks man! I like the idea of the decorative concrete. Do you happen to know any sites where I can look at some of that?

    The land slopes toward the house, but not so much that it creates a problem. The problem I have is standing water against the house where the water all runs to. Since it won't drain past the sidewalk, the water pools up against the house and stands there.



    Tyler- I did take a bit of a raise, but we also got a good deal on that house. And I'm making some sacrifices like selling the K5 to get there as well.
     
  5. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    I'd go with option 1.

    Then I'd dig a trench beyond the patio a few feet that runs across the width of the house and install drain tile. That way as the water naturally drains towards the house it'll get as far as the trench then be diverted around the house. Get the trench about 12-16" deep, add 6" of gravel over the drain tile and the rest top soil.

    You can run your gutter's downpipes into the trench too...

    Nice house BTW. That'd be worth about $500,000 to $900,000 here /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif

    Rene
     
  6. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    That's in Canadian dollars though, eh? /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif
     
  7. laketex

    laketex 3/4 ton status

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    hmmmmm...so you're saying dig a trench, and then fill it back in with gravel/dirt? Does this actually work for carrying water???
     
  8. ramjet gmc

    ramjet gmc CK5 Staff Staff Member Moderator GMOTM Winner

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    [ QUOTE ]
    I'd go with option 1.

    Then I'd dig a trench beyond the patio a few feet that runs across the width of the house and install drain tile. That way as the water naturally drains towards the house it'll get as far as the trench then be diverted around the house. Get the trench about 12-16" deep, add 6" of gravel over the drain tile and the rest top soil.

    You can run your gutter's downpipes into the trench too...

    Nice house BTW. That'd be worth about $500,000 to $900,000 here /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif

    Rene

    [/ QUOTE ]

    that is the way i would go too but as time and $$$$ go on i would slope the slope the water away and use gutters and 4 in PVC under groung

    ??? is that a craw space or slab on grade ??
     
  9. jjlaughner

    jjlaughner 3/4 ton status

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    I dont know how the taxes are down there but there are a couple levels in Indiana. The highest is blacktop, then white concrete then pavers. We covered the 10x12 concrete patio behind out house with the 18" stone pavers. When we got the edges we dug down a little layed in pea gravel then sand then the paver. We made our 10x12 patio go to 16x22-25 and the taxes dropped. (then we poured a 20x100' and a 25x75' driveways and the taxes went way back up).

    I'd look at digging a trinch from your house to the drainage ditch and laying pipe. Maybe dig out the lower areas between the sidewalk and house for a rock garden or for a patio, dig out 9-10" of dirt add rock, pea gravel, top with sand and then set your pavers.
    Or do a combination. Dig a hole under the sidewalk and dig up the area between the house and the sidewalk, have your drain tile come up under the sidewalk, then back fill the hole at the house with rocks and bury the drain pipe out to the ditch.
    like this /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif
     
  10. justinf

    justinf 1/2 ton status

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    If you use drainage tile, just make sure it continuously slopes down away from the house. The PO of my house put in drain tiles around the yard, and into the crawlspace of the house to help drain water out of the crawlspace during a rainstorm. The only problem is they are at a lower level in the crawlspace than outside, so water around the house actually drains into the crawlspace. /forums/images/graemlins/doah.gif /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif /forums/images/graemlins/screwy.gif
     
  11. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    If you were closer I'd give you 100ft of corrugated drainage hose that I bought and never used...

    If it doesn't cost that much, I'd also try to raise the grade immediately around the house to run the water over the walks. Or, possibly insane, dig a drywell nearby, and run pvc or drainage pipe to it, going under the walks if you can shoot the pipe under them. Grade slightly down from the house to a couple drain boxes ($30 home depot), and plumb them to the drywell.
    I'm in sort of a same boat, my neighbor seems to have raised his yard, and now we flood out bad in heavy rains. I'm going to dig at least 2 drywells if I can ever get a backhoe...
     
  12. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    [ QUOTE ]
    That's in Canadian dollars though, eh? /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Keep laughing Tyler, the difference in currency is steadily shrinking so it's not as funny as it used to be. Currently the exchange is 1.33 so a half million bucks is $376,000 USD. That would be the low end for that place here.

    rene
     
  13. gjk5

    gjk5 3/4 ton status

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    I think what most of these guys are talking about is a "french drain", and that is what I would suggest. There are many ways to go about it, several of which have been described in this post, and bunches more if you google it. Gutters are also a must, they will make a big difference.


    By the way, that place is sweet for the price. How big is that pond?

    I'm looking at more $$$ than that just for my 5 ac. lot! (Colorado's pricey though)
     

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