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Pinion nut technique question from the noob

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by uberbeans, Sep 14, 2006.

  1. uberbeans

    uberbeans 1/2 ton status

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    I am changing the gears in my 12 bolt (3.73's to 4.88's) and am also having a custom drive shaft made to hold 1350's. The shaft is already at the shop as they were going to use it as a model for the new one. They gave me a call saying that (because it was lifted) it was not far enough into my transfer case (slip yoke) and that they wanted me to take a measurement for the new shaft instead of using the old one as a model. I need to install the new pinion yoke before I can take the measurement. So I install the pinion with the new sleeve/nut/seal/yoke. I know that to torque it you need to begin to crush the sleeve and then carefully measure the running torque as you are torqueing. I also know that it takes roughly 300 ft lbs to begin to crush the sleeve. What is the expert opinions on holding the pinion from spinning while torqueing and what are you guys using to torque with (cheater bars?)? I really want to get the measurment to the shop before totally installing the r/p so they can get to work finishing my shaft (or is this wrong?). I have heard of using the same thickness of spacers as the old gears as a starting point before having to tear it down the 10 or so times to get the proper pattern. Is this what most people do? I think that if I torque it until the crush sleeve is staring to crush and then take a measurement for the drive shaft it will be close enough for the shop to make the shaft. What do you think? Sorry for all of the questions at the same time. This is not my daily driver, I want to do it myself, I am not going to upgrade to a 14 bolt (yet!), I have done this before (once, years ago, with much suffering), and I would really appreciate your expert opinion.:bow:
     
  2. 1977k5

    1977k5 3/4 ton status Vendor

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    When you are setting up the gears, don't put the crush sleeve in. Tighten the pinion nut until the pinion bearing preload is about right and take a pattern. Starting with the original shims is a good place to start. When I get a pattern I like, I prefer to use an impact to crush the crush sleeve. Most people don't have in impact strong enough for this. Before I had the impact I used a large pipe wrench and a really long cheater bar.
     
  3. uberbeans

    uberbeans 1/2 ton status

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    I have never heard of setting up the pinion without the crush sleeve before (not that I am an expert, either). Won't the lack of a crush sleeve change the pattern on the ring teeth, meaning once you put it in? Are you saying that I should just install the pinion without the crush sleeve to get the measurement for the driveshaft shop? Also, wouldn't using a big impact over torque the pinion bearing? How are you careful enough? Thanks again.
     
  4. pauly383

    pauly383 Daddy383 Staff Member Moderator

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    Man , if you just want to measure for the driveshaft , tape the yoke to the front on the axle housing where it would normally go .
     
  5. uberbeans

    uberbeans 1/2 ton status

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    Wouldn't the shaft be too long then?
     
  6. pauly383

    pauly383 Daddy383 Staff Member Moderator

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    Add an 1/8th of an inch then to accomodate the space behind the yoke where the slinger is :thumb:
     
  7. uberbeans

    uberbeans 1/2 ton status

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    Sounds good. Since it is a slip yoke an 1/8th inch (or a quarter) won't matter. What is the slinger? Do you guys ever use a "yoke wrench". I ordered one from summit
     
  8. 1977k5

    1977k5 3/4 ton status Vendor

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    If the pinion bearing preload is the same, the pattern won't change whether there is a crush sleeve in there or not. The crush sleeve is for long term pinion bearing preload. As far as using an impact to crush the crush sleeve, it is very possible to get too much pinion bearing preload if you are not careful. Its not as tough as it sounds.
     
  9. uberbeans

    uberbeans 1/2 ton status

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    Cool. I bought a yoke wrench and I will use a breaker bar to overcome the crush sleeve, then I will torque to the proper pre-load. Sound right?
     
  10. Txchevy18

    Txchevy18 1/2 ton status

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    I ended u snapping a craftsman 1/2" breaker bar of my dads from the 80's w/ a 6 foot cheater bar trying crush the damn sleeve. Impact wouldnt even budge it (ir composite). Finnaly gave up and started the crush w/ the 20 ton press then finshed the crush w/ a torque wrench with a moving needle not a click kind. Instead of the yoke tool you can always use a pipe wrench on the yoke and just let it hit the frame...

    Txchevy
     
  11. Blue85

    Blue85 Troll Premium Member

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    I used a pipe wrench on the yoke, hitting against the floor. Then I put a breaker bar on the nut and ran a 4' pipe out the side of the truck. Starting the sleeve was as easy as stepping on the end of the pipe.
     
  12. uberbeans

    uberbeans 1/2 ton status

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    I'll end up getting a decent breaker bar and a cheater. I want to be able to feel the sleeve starting to crush so I can then check the running torque. I think the onlt way to do that is to have a really long cheater so you don't have to exert your self to the point of over torqueing it. Does this make sense?
     

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