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Pipe bombs

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Z3PR, May 4, 2002.

  1. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Pipe bombs wound 5 in Iowa, Illinois

    Warning: 'Do not touch the item or slam the box door'

    May 4, 2002 Posted: 7:19 AM EDT (1119 GMT)

    WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Five people
    were wounded Friday when pipe bombs
    placed in rural mailboxes in Illinois and
    Iowa exploded, prompting the U.S.
    Postal Service to call carriers back and
    suspend Saturday delivery service in
    the area.

    "At this point, it appears as though the
    explosives devices were intended to
    detonate when they were removed from
    rural boxes, mailboxes," U.S. Postal
    Service Inspector Linda Jensen said.

    The eight pipe bombs -- placed in
    primarily rural areas of the two states --
    were made from three-quarter-inch pipes
    with a 9-volt battery attached. Postal
    officials said the bombs did not go through
    the U.S. mail and appeared to be placed in
    mailboxes randomly.

    Each bomb was accompanied by a plastic bag containing a letter filled with
    anti-government statements and threats of more bombs. (Read the note)

    "We looked at the letter that had accompanied the
    devices and are viewing it as a domestic terrorism
    incident," said FBI Special Agent James Bogner.
    "There is indication that there may be other devices."

    The letters were either the same or contained similar
    information, he added, and did not indicate how
    many others may exist -- but it did promise more
    "attention getters" are on the way.

    The FBI, U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the
    bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms have
    formed a joint task force with the U.S. Postal
    Service.

    Explosive devices were found in areas near the
    Iowa-Illinois border, including Morrison, Mount
    Carroll and Elizabeth, Illinois, and at Asbury, Farley, Tipton, Anamosa and Scott
    County in Iowa.

    No threats were phoned in about the devices to either postal officials or the FBI,
    officials said.

    Jensen said it's unclear whether the culprit acted alone or with others in placing the
    devices.

    "There are some consistencies among the placed devices that would indicate that
    there may be some effort that was related, but it's really early in the investigation at
    this point," she said.

    One of the bombs detonated in Morrison, Illinois, as a rural mail carrier opened the
    mailbox to deliver mail, a Whiteside County Sheriff's dispatcher said. The mail
    carrier suffered lacerations to her arms and face.

    A plastic bag containing a typed letter was found lying on the ground about 8 feet
    away from the mailbox, the dispatcher said.

    Around 6:30 a.m. (7:30 a.m. EDT), two people in Scott County, Iowa, went
    outside to get the morning paper and saw wires around the door of their mailbox,
    said Capt. Mike Brown of the county sheriff's department.

    The couple opened the mailbox and saw the bomb, which did not detonate, he said.
    The couple was not injured. Brown said the county bomb squad went to the site
    and removed the device.

    A couple of hours later, the sheriff's office discovered the other cases in the region,
    at which point they began working with the FBI, ATF, U.S. Postal Inspection
    Service and state agencies.

    Jensen said all carrier or postal customers should be very cautious when opening
    mailboxes and should take special care if wires, a pipe or a letter in a clear plastic
    bag are found.

    "Please, please, do not touch the item or slam the box door," she said.

    Customers who find suspicious items or notice someone putting things in
    mailboxes are urged to call the local police or the U.S. Postal Inspection Service
    command center in St. Louis at (314) 539-9310 and immediately clear the area
    around the mailbox.

    -- CNN producer Terry Frieden contributed to this report.
     
  2. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    This kind of thing just makes me sick !!!!! I just can't understand what this person/these people think they are doing !!!! I read things like this and think about my 69 Y/O mother getting her mail, and my 4 Y/O nephew running to the mail box. What is this world coming to when it isn't safe to get yer mail ???? I feel for those people who have been injured, and the familys searching for a reson to this insanity.
     
  3. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Sunday, May 5, 2002

    Sixth Pipe Bomb Found in Nebraska

    OHIOWA, Neb. (AP) - Rural carriers planned to deliver mail as usual on
    Monday despite the discovery of six mailbox pipe bombs in Nebraska that
    brought to 14 the total number of the weapons found across the Midwest
    in recent days, authorities said Sunday.

    No arrests had been made in the case Sunday, as officials renewed pleas
    that whoever planted the bombs contact them and make their grievances
    clear.

    ``I hope whoever is responsible would respond,'' said Thayer County Sheriff
    David Lee, whose department received a call on one bomb found in a rural
    mailbox near Davenport on Saturday.

    Six people were injured by explosions in Illinois and Iowa on Friday. None
    of the six bombs found Saturday in rural areas of Nebraska went off. They
    were later detonated harmlessly by authorities.

    An anti-government note found with the bombs warned of more ``attention
    getters,'' and federal authorities described the bombs as an act of
    domestic terrorism.

    ``We're still trying to get this thing put together. We are aggressively
    investigating,'' said FBI spokesman Pete Sakaris in Omaha.

    Among the six people injured Friday, only a 61-year-old woman remained
    hospitalized Sunday. Doris Zimmerman, who lives near Anamosa, Iowa,
    was listed in fair condition.

    No widespread inspections of rural Nebraska mailboxes were planned,
    and rural carriers intended to deliver mail as usual Monday, said Dave
    Margritz, a postal inspector in Omaha.

    Rural carriers will be on heightened alert, Margritz said Sunday.

    Mail carrier Lyle Bartels of Ohiowa said he'll be cautious when he returns
    to his route. Two of the pipe bombs found Saturday were in his delivery
    area.

    ``I'm just going to try to look the boxes over a little bit before I open them,''
    Bartels said. ``It's kind of scary.''

    No decision had been made by early afternoon Sunday on deliveries in
    Iowa, said Richard Watkins, a Postal Service spokesman in Des Moines.

    ``Postal Service is working with regional offices and local folks to
    determine what the next step should be,'' Watkins said.

    In Illinois, Carroll County Sheriff Rod Herrick said Sunday that most
    residents seemed to have gotten over their shock, although some people
    were asking him to use fishing line to remotely open their mailboxes as a
    precaution.

    ``It's a typical Sunday. People are on the golf course. People are fishing,''
    Herrick said.

    One mail carrier injured by a bomb even took his wife to dinner later Friday
    night ``to celebrate his survival,'' Herrick said.

    Lee, the Thayer County sheriff, said the message conveyed by the bombs
    is that terrorism can happen anywhere.

    ``Thayer County is just a rural, farming community, and I think that's just
    showing that these kind of acts are going to reach everyone - not just
    large metropolitan areas,'' the sheriff said.

    Lee's request on Sunday that the bomber contact authorities followed a
    similar message from the FBI on Saturday.

    ``You have gotten our attention. We are not certain we understand your
    message. We would like to hear from you. We are listening,'' said
    Weysan Dun, assistant special agent-in-charge of the FBI's Omaha office.
    ``You do not need to send any more attention getters.''

    Postal officials said the bombs found Friday were accompanied by
    typewritten notes in clear plastic bags that said, in part:

    ``If the government controls what you want to do they control what you
    can do. ... I'm obtaining your attention in the only way I can. More info is
    on its way. More 'attention getters' are on the way.''

    Officials described the bombs as three-quarter-inch steel pipes attached
    to a 9-volt battery, and said they appeared to be triggered by being
    touched or moved.

    Two bombs found Friday in Iowa and the six found Saturday in Nebraska
    didn't go off, even though at least two were picked up or moved by people
    reaching for their mail. Five of the Nebraska bombs were in rural roadside
    boxes; the sixth was in a mailbox in a residential development outside
    Seward.

    The FBI and Postal Service urged residents and mail carriers to be
    cautious.

    ``We are asking postal patrons to keep their mailboxes open. We would
    recommend they tape it open,'' said Rick Bowdren, inspector-in-charge of
    the Midwest division of the Postal Inspection Service. ``That way the
    carrier making a delivery can look in and patrons can look in and that
    anxiety factor will be alleviated.''
     
  4. potato76

    potato76 1/2 ton status

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    makes ya think whats the world coming to.Hey when can we start moving to mars?????
     
  5. 70jimmy

    70jimmy 3/4 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Took the door off mine yesterday because of this.
     
  6. potato76

    potato76 1/2 ton status

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    mine wouldnt fit a whold pipe bomb in it and it sits too close to the house i dont think they would want to risk being seen.
     
  7. muddin4fun

    muddin4fun 3/4 ton status

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    /forums/images/icons/mad.gif I better wait to respond /forums/images/icons/mad.gif
     
  8. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - The
    15 pipe bombs left in
    mailboxes in Illinois,
    Iowa and Nebraska
    were nearly identical
    and clearly came from
    the same source, the
    FBI said Monday as
    letter carriers across
    the region cautiously
    resumed deliveries.

    Agent Larry Holmquist
    said the bombs were
    made with the same
    material. The only
    differences were some
    slight variations in the
    detonation
    mechanisms, he said,
    refusing to elaborate.

    ``There is no question that these were planted by the same
    person or persons,'' Holmquist said. He said letters planted with
    the bombs, which carry an anti-government message, also were
    identical.

    Six people were injured by explosions in Illinois and Iowa on
    Friday. Two other bombs found in Iowa did not explode. Six
    bombs were found Saturday in rural areas of Nebraska, and a
    seventh was found Sunday. The Nebraska bombs were all
    detonated harmlessly by authorities.

    The bombs come just seven months after the Postal Service was
    rocked by the anthrax scare that killed five people on the East
    Coast. In that case, the anthrax was sent through the mail.

    Mail delivery resumed Monday after letter carriers were given
    safety talks.

    ``Obviously some carriers will be out late because of what all is
    going on,'' said Roger Humphries, Postal Service spokesman.
    ``They have always been trained to look for anything
    suspicious, but obviously today that training will mean even
    more.''

    Mail delivery had been suspended Saturday in rural northeast
    Iowa and part of northwest Illinois after Friday's explosions.

    Wearing safety goggles and ear plugs, letter carrier Jim Pelzer
    reported to work Monday in Tipton, Iowa, near where one of the
    pipe bombs exploded Friday. The new protective gear was a gift
    from his wife.

    ``My feeling was when we had 9-11 and the anthrax scare, I
    was a little concerned about my job safety,'' Pelzer said. ``But
    now I'm intimidated and scared.''

    The Postal Service asked customers in Nebraska, Iowa and
    northwest Illinois with roadside delivery to secure their mailbox
    doors open or remove the doors.

    Initial reports were that many mail customers in Nebraska and
    Iowa had gotten the message. Rural mail carriers said most
    homeowners on their routes had left mailbox doors open.

    ``What's been in the media has made it to the residences. We
    just hope this is just a short-term inconvenience,'' said Greg
    Walz, postmaster in Seward, where one of the bombs was
    found Saturday.

    If a mailbox door is not open, carriers attempted to deliver mail
    to the door.

    The note found with the bombs warned of more ``attention
    getters,'' and federal authorities described the bombs as an act
    of domestic terrorism.

    In addition to the real bombs, one fake bomb was found Sunday
    in Nebraska, and 18-year-old man was arrested in that prank.

    Officials on Sunday renewed pleas that whoever planted the
    bombs contact them and make their grievances clear.

    ``I hope whoever is responsible would respond,'' said Thayer
    County Sheriff David Lee, whose department received a call
    about a bomb found in a rural mailbox near Davenport.

    Postal officials said the typewritten notes accompanying the
    bombs said, in part:

    ``If the government controls what you want to do they control
    what you can do. ... I'm obtaining your attention in the only way
    I can. More info is on its way. More 'attention getters' are on the
    way.''

    Officials described the bombs as three-quarter-inch steel pipes
    attached to 9-volt batteries, and said they appeared to be
    triggered by being touched or moved.

    Of the six injured people, none remained hospitalized Monday.

    On the Net:

    Postal Service: http://www.usps.com

    FBI: http://www.fbi.gov
     
  9. White Knight

    White Knight 1/2 ton status

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    These are low-life cowards, people who strike terror from darks corners, too chicken-sh%t to look a man in the eyes and kill him. I hope they find the little peckered nut case and dispence some good ole Southern Justice on his ass.

    This kind of stuff just pi%%es me off so bad, whats wrong with someones wiring to act this way, if they have a beef with someone or the Government then fine take it out on that person or the Government itself but not innocent people.

    Mind you I'm not advocating striking out at the Government because its a no-win scenerio. But hey thats why we have the rights we have, vote, work within the system...whatever....but pipe bombs..jeez what a low life. Ain't no different than bin laden and need to be treated the same.

    White Knight
     
  10. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    FBI: Texas pipe bomb similar
    to others found

    Tuesday, May 7, 2002



    A pipe bomb similar to 17 found in four other states was discovered in
    a rural mailbox in Texas, the FBI told The Associated Press on
    Tuesday.

    The bomb was found near Amarillo, Texas, said FBI agent Larry
    Holmquist in Omaha. A letter was attached, investigators told the AP.

    "It's another pipe bomb. It looks similar to the others," Holmquist told
    the AP. "Upon our initial inspection, it appears it would be from the
    same source."

    FBI agents said Monday they believe one person seeking attention is
    responsible for 17 pipe bombs that have been found recently in
    mailboxes in the Midwest and Colorado.

    Authorities said they based their belief on the fact that typewritten
    letters attached to the bombs were in the first person singular and the
    bombs were similar in design.

    In the letters, the writer is critical of the government and appears
    focused on death, stating: "If the government controls what you want
    to do, they control what you can do."

    And: "There is no such thing as death. The people I've dismissed from
    this reality are not at all dead."

    The writer adds, "I'm obtaining your attention in the only way I can,"
    and promises more "attention-getters."

    FBI profilers studied the notes over the weekend and concluded
    Monday the bomber appears to be an educated white man whose
    native language is English.

    Pipe bombs found during the past week in mailboxes in Iowa, Illinois,
    Nebraska and Colorado have injured six people.

    A bomb that appears not to have been related was found after it
    exploded inside a mailbox in Waldorf, Maryland, outside Washington.
    Unlike the others, which were pipe bombs, it was made with chemicals
    contained in a soda bottle, authorities said.

    Though nearly identical, the 17 bombs in the Midwest and Colorado
    differed in their detonation mechanisms, federal authorities said
    Monday.

    "The detonation devices were apparently different in Iowa and Illinois
    from what they were in Nebraska," said Holmquist. "The difference [in
    the detonators] caused the explosives in Nebraska to be somewhat
    more stable and less likely to explode if someone were to handle it.
    However, they still were active explosives."

    Six of the eight bombs found in Iowa and Illinois blew up Friday,
    wounding four postal employees and two residents. Two other devices
    were discovered but rendered safe.

    None of the seven bombs found in eastern Nebraska over the weekend
    nor the one found Monday near Hastings detonated, a spokeswoman
    for the Nebraska State Patrol said.

    Yet another pipe bomb was found Monday in Salida, Colorado, attached
    to a folded piece of paper.

    Construction was "consistent with those found recently in Nebraska and
    Iowa," said a statement from the FBI's Denver office.

    "Residents throughout Colorado are asked to exercise extreme caution
    when opening their mailboxes and to immediately report any
    suspicious packages or activities to appropriate authorities," the
    statement added.

    The U.S. Postal Service Web site said authorities are asking Colorado
    residents to leave their rural mailbox doors open, so carriers can see
    inside the receptacle.

    At a news conference Sunday, Mike Matuzek, Postal Service district
    manager for the Central Plains, asked residents of Iowa and Nebraska
    who owned "rural-style mailboxes" -- ones that are mounted at the
    curb or a good distance away from a residence -- to remove mailbox
    doors or fix them in such a way that the doors can't be closed without
    significant effort. He also predicted Illinois would follow suit.

    "This is to provide for the safety and well-being of not only the public
    but also the postal employees that are delivering the mail, " Matuzek
    said.

    Federal officials emphasized that, though the devices have been found
    in mailboxes, none was sent through the mail.

    Most of the pipes were about 1 inch in diameter and 6 inches long and
    were attached to wires or a battery.

    The FBI has called the bombs a case of domestic terrorism.

    -- CNN Justice Correspondent Kelli Arena contributed to this report.
     
  11. newyorkin

    newyorkin 1 ton status

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    Anyone watch Arlington rd?

    This is pretty messed up.
     
  12. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    FBI issues bulletin in pipe
    bomb cases

    Tuesday, May 7, 2002


    The FBI on Tuesday issued an all-points bulletin for a
    22-year-old man in connection with pipe bombs found in
    mailboxes in five states within the last week.

    The man was identified as Luke John Helder, whom the FBI
    described as a white male with dark hair and green eyes. The
    FBI said he was "armed and dangerous."

    The FBI said he was last seen in Texas -- where the most recent
    bomb was found -- driving a gray or black 1992 Honda Accord
    with a Minnesota license plate bearing the number EZL 783.

    The FBI said Tuesday that a pipe bomb found in a Texas mailbox
    appears similar to the 17 found in four other states.

    The explosive was discovered Monday night in Amarillo, Texas. A
    source from the FBI said he believed a note was found but could
    not confirm it.

    FBI agents said Monday they believe one person seeking
    attention is responsible for 17 pipe bombs that have been
    discovered since Friday in mailboxes in Iowa, Illinois, Nebraska
    and Colorado. Six people were injured last week in Iowa and
    Illinois.

    Authorities said they based their belief on the fact that
    typewritten letters attached to the bombs were in the first
    person singular and the bombs were similar in design.

    In the letters, the writer is critical of the government and
    appears focused on death, stating: "If the government controls
    what you want to do, they control what you can do."

    And: "There is no such thing as death. The people I've dismissed
    from this reality are not at all dead."

    The writer adds, "I'm obtaining your attention in the only way I
    can," and promises more "attention getters."

    FBI profilers studied the notes over the weekend and concluded
    Monday the bomber appears to be an educated white man
    whose native language is English.

    In addition, a bomb that appears not to have been related was
    found after it exploded inside a mailbox in Waldorf, Maryland,
    outside Washington. Unlike the others, which were pipe bombs,
    it was made with chemicals contained in a soda bottle,
    authorities said.

    Though nearly identical, the 17 bombs in the Midwest and
    Colorado differed in their detonation mechanisms, federal
    authorities said Monday.

    "The detonation devices were apparently different in Iowa and
    Illinois from what they were in Nebraska," said Holmquist. "The
    difference [in the detonators] caused the explosives in Nebraska
    to be somewhat more stable and less likely to explode if
    someone were to handle it. However, they still were active
    explosives."

    Six of the eight bombs found in Iowa and Illinois blew up Friday,
    wounding four postal employees and two residents. Two other
    devices were discovered but rendered safe.

    None of the seven bombs found in eastern Nebraska over the
    weekend nor the eighth one found Monday near Hastings
    detonated, a spokeswoman for the Nebraska State Patrol said.

    Yet another pipe bomb was found Monday in Salida, Colorado,
    attached to a folded piece of paper.

    Construction was "consistent with those found recently in
    Nebraska and Iowa," said a statement from the FBI's Denver
    office.

    "Residents throughout Colorado are asked to exercise extreme
    caution when opening their mailboxes and to immediately report
    any suspicious packages or activities to appropriate authorities,"
    the statement added.

    The U.S. Postal Service Web site said authorities are asking
    Colorado residents to leave their rural mailbox doors open, so
    carriers can see inside the receptacle.

    At a news conference Sunday, Mike Matuzek, Postal Service
    district manager for the Central Plains, asked residents of Iowa
    and Nebraska who owned "rural-style mailboxes" -- ones that
    are mounted at the curb or a good distance away from a
    residence -- to remove mailbox doors or fix them in such a way
    that the doors can't be closed without significant effort. He also
    predicted Illinois would follow suit.

    "This is to provide for the safety and well-being of not only the
    public but also the postal employees that are delivering the mail,
    " Matuzek said.

    Federal officials emphasized that, though the devices have been
    found in mailboxes, none was sent through the mail.

    Most of the pipes were about 1 inch in diameter and 6 inches
    long and were attached to wires or a battery.

    The FBI has called the bombs a case of domestic terrorism.

    -- CNN Justice Correspondent Kelli Arena contributed to this
    report.
     
  13. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    i think they should shove one of this guys bombs in his #$% and set it off. Justice served. /forums/images/icons/mad.gif

    J
     
  14. AGM73k5

    AGM73k5 1/2 ton status

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    I think justice would involve restitution. But maybe that's just me.

    -Aaron
     
  15. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Man captured in mailbox bomb cases

    May 7, 2002 Posted: 9:55 PM EDT (0155 GMT)

    LOVELOCK, Nevada (CNN) -- The man
    sought for questioning in a rash of
    incidents in which pipe bombs were
    planted in mailboxes in five states was
    taken into federal custody Tuesday night
    in Nevada, federal authorities said.

    Luke John Helder was taken into custody at
    7:55 p.m. EDT after his car was stopped by
    the Nevada Highway Patrol in Lovelock,
    about 90 miles northeast of Reno,
    authorities said. They said he was
    apprehended following discussions with
    police and is now in federal custody.

    Helder, 21, still has not been charged with a
    crime, authorities said.

    The FBI had earlier in the day issued an
    all-points bulletin for Helder, wanted for
    questioning in a rash of incidents in which
    pipe bombs were planted in mailboxes in
    five states in the past five days, in some
    cases exploding.

    The FBI had warned Helder should be considered "armed and dangerous" and said
    he was driving a 4-door gray or black 1992-model Honda Accord bearing
    Minnesota license plate EZL 873. He was last seen in Texas.

    Helder was described as white, 5-foot-9 and, weighing 150 pounds with brown hair
    and green eyes. He is a student at the University of Wisconsin-Stout and a member
    of a three-person rock band called "Apathy," investigators said.

    At an afternoon news conference in Omaha,
    Nebraska, the FBI distributed a photograph of Helder
    and asked him to turn himself in so that nobody else
    will be harmed.

    Authorities described Helder as "an intelligent young
    man with strong family ties," said he has not been
    charged with any crime at this point and stopped
    short of identifying him as a suspect.

    The young man's father, Cameron Helder, issued an
    emotional appeal Tuesday to his son to turn himself
    in.

    "Luke is not a dangerous person. He is just trying to
    make a statement," the elder Helder told reporters.

    The father added, choking back tears at times,
    "Luke, you need to talk to someone. Please don't hurt
    anyone else. It's time to talk. You have the attention
    you wanted. We love you very much. We want you
    home safe. Please call."

    Authorities had earlier released one of the typewritten
    notes left with the bombs which said, "If the
    government controls what you want to do, they
    control what you can do." It adds, "There is no such
    thing as death" and "I'm obtaining your attention the
    only way I can."

    Student had no disciplinary problems

    FBI Special Agent James Bogner said that
    investigators want to talk to Helder about the series
    of bombs in the Midwest and urged him to come forward.

    "We do not want to see him harmed or any public harmed," Bogner said.

    The agent said investigators believe the suspect moved from Illinois to Iowa and
    Nebraska and then Colorado and Texas. "We think he may be located in that part of
    the country," he said.

    Bogner said that he did not have any indications that Helder had a gun, but in the
    all-points bulletin, the FBI said he should be considered "armed and dangerous."

    He has not been charged with any crime, authorities emphasized.

    The FBI urged anybody with information to call a toll-free number, 866-847-2324.

    Jennifer Klement, a spokeswoman for the University of Wisconsin-Stout at
    Menomonie, said Helder is registered there as a junior. She said Helder, whose
    home is in Pine Island, Minnesota, is majoring in art with a concentration in
    industrial design. The university, which is just west of Eau Claire, has no record of
    disciplinary problems involving Helder.

    This is the last week of classes at the state institution, which has about 8,000
    students. Final exams are scheduled next week.

    The school newspaper Tuesday printed a letter postmarked May 4 and signed by
    Helder that stated he was going to die "to change all of you for the better."

    Different detonation devices

    Monday's incident in Texas raised to 18 the number of pipe bombs found since last
    Friday. Six people were injured in explosions from the first bombs in Illinois and
    Iowa. The devices are cylindrical, about 6 inches long, three-quarters of an inch in
    diameter with wires attached to a 9-volt battery.

    According to federal investigators, three
    mailbox bombs were found in Illinois, five
    in Iowa, eight in Nebraska, one in Colorado
    and one in Texas.

    Though nearly identical, the bombs differed
    in their detonation mechanisms.

    "The detonation devices were apparently
    different in Iowa and Illinois from what
    they were in Nebraska," said Larry
    Holmquist, a spokesman for the FBI's field
    division in Omaha. "The difference [in the
    detonators] caused the explosives in
    Nebraska to be somewhat more stable and less likely to explode if someone were to
    handle it. However, they still were active explosives."

    In Washington, Postmaster General John Potter said Tuesday 150 postal inspectors
    were involved in the investigation. He said his agency's top priority "has been to
    alert our employees and the public about the precautionary measures that should be
    taken to minimize possible risks.

    Federal officials emphasized that, though the devices have been found in mailboxes,
    none of them was sent through the mail.

    Though the FBI has classified the incidents as domestic terrorism, federal officials
    Tuesday noted that between 1993 and 1997 an average of between 4,700 and 5,300
    "explosive incidents" were reported around the country each year -- with mailbox
    bombings acccounting for 26 percent, the most predominant kind.

    -- CNN Correspondents Kelli Arena and Rusty Dornin and Producers Terry Frieden and
    Bill Mears contributed to this story.
     
  16. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Student to be arraigned in pipe bomb cases

    May 8, 2002 Posted: 10:03 AM EDT (1403 GMT)

    RENO, Nevada (CNN) -- A 21-year-old
    college student suspected in a wave of
    pipe bomb incidents is expected to be
    arraigned Wednesday before a federal
    magistrate in Reno, Nevada, after a
    night on suicide watch at the Washoe
    County Jail, authorities said.

    Luke John Helder -- sought in connection
    with 18 mailbox pipe bombs in five states --
    was booked Tuesday night on federal
    charges of possession of a firearm and
    using a bomb device in the commission of a
    crime, said Cindy Lehr, a sheriff's support
    specialist at the jail.

    Helder is expected to be taken from the jail
    to U.S. District Court in downtown Reno
    between 9 and 9:30 a.m. MDT, said
    Washoe County Sheriff Dennis Balaam.

    Nevada State Police stopped Helder on
    Tuesday afternoon after a high-speed chase
    along Interstate 80 in Nevada. Officers
    persuaded Helder to surrender without
    incident. He then was turned over to federal
    authorities. The student threatened to harm
    himself when he surrendered, prompting the suicide watch, Balaam said.

    Six of the bombs in Iowa and Illinois exploded Friday, wounding four postal
    employees and two others.

    U.S. Attorney Charles W. Larson in Cedar Rapids,
    Iowa, charged Helder with two criminal counts.

    One count charges him with using an explosive to
    maliciously destroy property affecting interstate
    commerce. The other accuses him of using a
    destructive device to commit a crime of violence
    that wounded a woman when she opened her
    roadside mailbox in rural Tipton, Iowa.

    If convicted, Helder would face up to 40 years in
    prison on count one and up to a life sentence on the
    second count, said James Bogner, FBI special agent
    in charge for Iowa and Nebraska.

    Bogner said a federal complaint also was being
    sought in the Northern District of Illinois.

    Letter sent to student paper

    The FBI identified the student on the basis of a letter he sent from Omaha,
    Nebraska, to the Badger Herald -- a publication at the University of
    Wisconsin-Madison.

    The letter was sent Friday, the day that the first pipe bombs were discovered in
    Illinois and Iowa. More bombs were found in three other states in subsequent days.
    Altogether, three mailbox bombs were found in Illinois, five in Iowa, eight in
    Nebraska, one in Colorado and one in Texas, according to federal investigators.

    Helder was a student at the University of Wisconsin-Stout in Menomonie and a
    member of a three-person rock band called Apathy, investigators said.

    In his letter to the school paper, Helder said, "I will die/change in the end for this,
    but that's OK, hahaha paradise awaits! I'm dismissing a few individuals from
    reality, to change all of you for the better, surely you can understand my logic."

    The letter was titled, "Explosions! A Bit of Evidence for You!"

    The student newspaper said it turned the letter over to the FBI on Tuesday
    afternoon.

    The FBI then issued an all-points bulletin seeking Helder for questioning. The FBI
    alert described Helder as "armed and dangerous" and said he was driving a car with
    a Minnesota license plate.

    The bulletin was issued the day after the most recent bomb was found Monday
    afternoon in a curbside mailbox in a residential area of Amarillo, Texas, with a note
    containing "anti-government propaganda" attached.

    The devices were cylindrical, about 6 inches long, three-quarters of an inch in
    diameter, with wires attached to a 9-volt battery.

    Letters with anti-government rhetoric accompanied all the bombs.

    Authorities described Helder as "an intelligent young man with strong family ties."

    Earlier Tuesday, Helder's father, Cameron
    Helder, issued an emotional appeal to his
    son to turn himself in.

    "Luke is not a dangerous person. He is just
    trying to make a statement," the elder
    Helder told reporters.

    Choking back tears at times, the father
    added, "Luke, you need to talk to someone.
    Please don't hurt anyone else. It's time to
    talk. You have the attention you wanted.
    We love you very much. We want you
    home safe. Please call."

    Jennifer Klement, a spokeswoman for the University of Wisconsin-Stout, said
    Helder is registered as a junior.

    She said Helder, whose home is Pine Island, Minnesota, was an art major with a
    concentration in industrial design. The university, which is west of Eau Claire, had
    no record of disciplinary problems involving Helder.

    -- CNN correspondents Kelli Arena and Rusty Dornin and producers Terry Frieden and
    Bill Mears contributed to this report.
     
  17. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Feds: Suspect admitted pipe bomb spree

    May 8, 2002 Posted: 11:14 PM EDT (0314 GMT)

    RENO, Nevada (CNN) -- Accused
    mailbox bomber Lucas Helder admitted
    he planted 18 pipe bombs in five states
    during a weekend cross-country spree,
    knowing that people would be injured
    when they exploded, a federal
    prosecutor said Wednesday.

    During the first court appearance for the
    clean-cut, 21-year-old college student and
    one-time rock band member, assistant
    U.S. Attorney Craig Denney said police
    seized a shotgun loaded with a single
    round from Helder's car following a
    high-speed chase on a Nevada highway.

    Denney said the suspect told authorities he
    purchased the gun intending to take his
    own life.

    Police also found six pipe bombs found in the trunk of Helder's car, Denney said.

    Meanwhile, several pipe bomb-like devices found in mailboxes in eastern Indiana do
    not appear to be connected to pipe bombs planted in five other states over the
    weekend, federal authorities said Wednesday. (Full story)

    In the Reno hearing, U.S. District Judge Robert McQuaid agreed with the
    prosecutor that Helder should be detained without bond, saying he posed a danger
    to the community and an escape risk, despite defense pleas that he be released to
    the custody of his family.

    The judge said he believes Helder "suffers from some apparent mental health
    problems" -- a reference to his suspected suicidal intentions.

    Denney said Helder waived his Miranda rights
    before admitting he planted the bombs in five states
    -- pointing out the towns on a map. Six people were
    injured by explosions in Iowa and Illinois.

    Notes with anti-government messages were found
    in the rural roadside mailboxes where the pipe
    bombs were placed.

    McQuaid ordered Helder moved to Cedar Rapids,
    Iowa, where he faces two federal charges, the first
    of several filed since Tuesday night.

    One count accuses Helder of using an explosive "to
    maliciously destroy property affecting interstate
    commerce." The other charges him with "using a
    destructive device to commit a crime of violence"
    that wounded a woman when she opened her
    roadside mailbox in rural Tipton, Iowa.

    If convicted on the latter charge, he could be
    sentenced to life in prison.

    Similar charges were filed against him by a U.S.
    attorney in Illinois. In Nebraska, he faces another
    federal charge of interstate transportation of
    explosives. In Nevada, he faces a charge of
    possession of a firearm in the commission of a
    crime.

    No timetable was mentioned for his transfer to
    Iowa.

    Helder, dressed in orange pants, T-shirt and jacket
    stenciled with a black jail insignia, stood by a
    podium next to court-appointed public defender
    Vito Dela Cruz for the duration of the 25-minute
    hearing. He appeared relaxed and at ease, though
    tired.

    Before the hearing, he occasionally smiled while
    talking with his lawyer. During the hearing, he was
    casual and matter of fact.

    As the session began, the judge asked if Lucas John
    Helder was his true name. "Yeah, that's correct,"
    Helder answered.

    "Do you understand that you don't have to make
    any statements," McQuaid asked.

    "Most definitely," the suspect responded.

    "If you do make a statement, it could be used
    against you," the judge said.

    "For sure," Helder replied.

    Cell phone leads to suspect

    Helder's admissions to the FBI were made public
    earlier in the day in an FBI affidavit filed in Omaha, Nebraska, where the suspect
    allegedly assembled some of his pipe bombs.

    The affidavit said Helder admitted "manufacturing eight pipe bombs in his apartment
    in Wisconsin" and 16 more at a hotel near Omaha.

    The affidavit said eight pipe bombs were left at locations in Illinois and Iowa, where
    six people were injured in explosions. Another eight bombs were placed in
    Nebraska and one each in Colorado and Texas, the affidavit said.

    Authorities were tipped to Helder's identity Monday night when the art student's
    adoptive father telephoned the police chief in Menomonie, Wisconsin, the college
    town where Helder lived and attended the University of Wisonsin-Stout.

    Cameron Helder "called us and said he had
    received a letter from his son and the
    contents led him to believe his son may be
    involved," Menomonie Police Chief Dennis
    Beety said.

    Helder's arrest near Reno Tuesday
    afternoon marked the end of an intensive
    manhunt that included a high-speed chase
    through a stark Nevada landscape. He spent
    the night under suicide watch in the
    Washoe County Jail.

    Authorities located Helder by tracking a pair
    of cellular phone calls he made to friends in Minnesota, said Sheriff Dennis Balaam
    of Washoe County, Nevada.

    In another criminal complaint filed in Iowa, FBI Special Agent Scott B. French said
    the two friends said Helder admitted he was responsible for the mailbox bombings.

    After pinpointing Helder, agents negotiated for his surrender as he drove through
    Nevada. Balaam said the chase reached speeds of between 85 mph and 100 mph
    before Helder pulled over on Interstate 80.

    Stopped three times before arrest

    The complaint filed against Helder in Iowa said police had stopped him three times
    since Saturday. All three stops were made before authorities got the tip from his
    adoptive father.

    Two were speeding stops near St. Edward, Nebraska, just after midnight Saturday,
    and in Fowler, Colorado, before 3 p.m. Sunday.

    The third was a stop for failure to wear a seat belt about 2 p.m. Saturday near
    Watonga, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma trooper also cited Helder for an expired
    driver's license.

    The first Nebraska trooper to stop Helder reported he told him he "didn't mean to
    hurt anybody" as he approached. The Colorado trooper said Helder "appeared to be
    very nervous and had very watery eyes like he was going to cry."

    Helder had a 10-minute conversation with his parents Wednesday morning and they
    assured him they still supported him, Balaam said.

    His parents also allowed agents from the FBI and the bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco
    and Firearms to search their home "for public safety reasons."

    The parents told authorities that financial considerations meant they probably would
    wait until their son is transferred from Reno before they visit him.

    -- CNN correspondents Charles Feldman and Martin Savidge and Producer Mike
    Ahlers contributed to this report.
     
  18. ChevyHuny

    ChevyHuny 1/2 ton status

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    I freaked out yesterday becuase I grew up in Reno its my hometown and I have friends and family there. When the news first broke the title of the report was "terrorist bombings in Reno Nevada" Why do they do that? It scared the hell out of me. Come to find out they just caught the guy outside of Reno, Not that there had been terrorist bombings. Thank god they did catch him before anyone else was hurt but GEEZ. Scared the heck out of me /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  19. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    Police: Suspect planned smiley face bomb
    pattern

    May 9, 2002 Posted: 6:05 PM EDT (2205 GMT)

    RENO, Nevada (CNN) -- Accused mailbox
    bomber Lucas Helder told authorities
    he was planting pipe bombs in a pattern
    to show a happy face during his
    five-state weekend spree.

    Helder made the admission to an
    undercover officer present at his arrest
    Tuesday, according to Lt. Thom Bjerke of
    the Pershing County, Nevada, Sheriff's
    Department.

    "He seemed kind of carefree or amused
    about what was going on," Bjerke told
    CNN Thursday.

    Helder has admitted he planted 18 pipe
    bombs in five states, knowing that people
    would be injured when they exploded,
    Assistant U.S. Attorney Craig Denney said
    Wednesday.

    Helder's parents -- looking grim and harried -- visited their son in jail Thursday, a
    day before his scheduled transfer to Iowa, the first state where charges were filed
    against him.

    "We are here to see our son," said Cameron Helder, the young man's adoptive
    father. "We told him we love him. I feel a lot better after speaking to him."

    The father thanked the FBI and the Washoe County, Nevada, Sheriff's Department
    "for making this visit with Luke possible so that we have a better understanding of
    what's going on in his mind."

    "Our heart goes out to the families of victims and the victims," he said. "We're
    really sorry."

    Tr ansfer to Iowa set Friday

    Lucas Helder will be moved Friday from Reno,
    according to Rich Murphy, an assistant U.S.
    attorney, to Cedar Rapids, Iowa. "He's scheduled to
    be in court here at 4:30 p.m. CT," Murphy said.

    A two-count criminal complaint was filed Tuesday
    in federal court in Iowa, charging the student with
    using bombs to maliciously destroy property and to
    "commit a crime of violence" that injured a woman
    in rural Tipton. (Read the criminal complaint -- PDF)

    Conviction on that offense could result in a life
    prison sentence.

    Similar federal charges were filed against him in
    Illinois. In Nebraska, he faces another federal
    charge of interstate transportation of explosives. In
    Nevada, he faces a charge of possession of a
    firearm in the commission of a crime.

    During the first court appearance Wednesday for
    the clean-cut college student and one-time rock
    band member, Denney said police seized a shotgun
    loaded with a single round from Helder's car
    following a high-speed chase on an interstate in
    Nevada.

    Denney said the suspect told authorities he
    purchased the gun intending to take his life.

    Helder was heading to California with six
    unexploded pipe bombs in his trunk when he was
    captured, Washoe County Sheriff Dennis Balaam
    told reporters Thursday.

    The weekend spree has sparked alerts and possible
    copycat crimes. In Spokane, Washington, officials
    said several small explosive devices were placed in
    mailboxes around town.

    But police said the bombs were not placed to go off
    when someone opened the mailboxes, as the ones in
    the Midwest were.

    "We think that this is a prank by probably a juvenile
    in that area," said U.S. Postal Inspector Larry
    Carlier.

    The Spokane explosives were made from plastic
    bottles filled with chemicals that react when mixed,
    producing gases that eventually blow the bottles
    apart.

    They were placed in a small area, and were
    "nothing like what we've experienced in the
    Midwest," Spokane County Sheriff Mark Sterk
    said.

    In Indiana, several pipe bomb-like devices found in
    mailboxes in the eastern part of the state did not
    appear to be connected to the Helder spree, federal
    authorities said Wednesday. (Full story)

    Appeared at ease in court

    In the Reno hearing, U.S. District Judge Robert
    McQuaid agreed with the prosecutor that Helder
    should be detained without bond, saying he posed a
    danger to the community and an escape risk, despite defense pleas that he be
    released to the custody of his family.

    The judge said he believes Helder "suffers from some apparent mental health
    problems."

    Denney said Helder waived his Miranda rights before admitting he planted the
    bombs in five states -- pointing out the towns on a map.

    Notes with anti-government messages were found in the rural roadside mailboxes
    where the pipe bombs were placed.

    Helder, dressed in orange pants, T-shirt and
    jacket stenciled with a black jail insignia,
    stood by a podium next to court-appointed
    public defender Vito Dela Cruz for the
    duration of the 25-minute hearing. He
    appeared relaxed and at ease, though tired.

    Before the hearing, he occasionally smiled
    while talking with his attorney. During the
    hearing, he was casual and matter of fact.

    As the session began, the judge asked if
    Lucas John Helder was his true name.
    "Yeah, that's correct," Helder answered.

    "Do you understand that you don't have to make any statements?" McQuaid asked.

    "Most definitely," the suspect responded.

    "If you do make a statement, it could be used against you," the judge said.

    "For sure," Helder replied.

    Helder's admissions to the FBI were made public Wednesday in an FBI affidavit
    filed in Omaha, Nebraska, where the suspect allegedly assembled some of his pipe
    bombs.

    The affidavit said Helder admitted "manufacturing eight pipe bombs in his apartment
    in Wisconsin" and 16 more at a hotel near Omaha.

    The affidavit said eight pipe bombs were left at locations in Illinois and Iowa, where
    six people were injured. Another eight bombs were placed in Nebraska and one
    each in Colorado and Texas, the affidavit said.

    Cell phone leads to suspect

    Authorities were tipped to Helder's identity Monday night when the art student's
    father telephoned the police chief in Menomonie, Wisconsin, the college town
    where Helder lived and attended the University of Wisconsin-Stout.

    Cameron Helder "called us and said he had received a letter from his son and the
    contents led him to believe his son may be involved," Menomonie Police Chief
    Dennis Beety said.

    Authorities located Helder by tracking a pair of cellular phone calls he made to
    friends in Minnesota, said Balaam, the Washoe County sheriff.

    In criminal complaint filed in Iowa, FBI Special Agent Scott B. French said two
    friends said Helder admitted he was responsible for the mailbox bombings.

    After pinpointing Helder, agents negotiated for his surrender as he drove through
    Nevada. Balaam said the chase reached speeds of between 85 mph and 100 mph
    before Helder pulled over on Interstate 80. Helder spent Tuesday night under
    suicide watch in the Washoe County Jail.

    Stopped three times before arrest

    The complaint in Iowa said police had stopped the student three times since
    Saturday. All three stops were made before authorities got the tip from Cameron
    Helder.

    Two were speeding stops -- near St. Edward, Nebraska, just after midnight
    Saturday and in Fowler, Colorado, before 3 p.m. Sunday.

    The third was a stop for failure to wear a seat belt about 2 p.m. Saturday near
    Watonga, Oklahoma. The Oklahoma trooper also cited Lucas Helder for an expired
    driver's license.

    The first Nebraska trooper to stop Helder reported he told him he "didn't mean to
    hurt anybody" as he approached. The Colorado trooper said Helder "appeared to be
    very nervous and had very watery eyes like he was going to cry."

    -- CNN correspondents Charles Feldman and Martin Savidge and Producer Mike
    Ahlers contributed to this report.
     

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