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Polishes and wax

Discussion in 'The Body Shop' started by Stomper, Jan 18, 2006.

  1. Stomper

    Stomper ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ GMOTM Winner

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    What's good for removing oxidation(at least I think that is what it is)? We got a new to us tractor and the paint is a little faded, looks like it's sat outside most of it's life. I'd like to bring the shine back out and then protect the paint. So what works the best?

    Thanks,
     
  2. smokkey1

    smokkey1 1/2 ton status

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    I ussually use a rubing compond. Then wax. done it plenty of times and works great for me. I ussually use mothers.
     
  3. lamberthkp

    lamberthkp SITFU Premium Member

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    i myself use mothers
     
  4. rjfguitar

    rjfguitar 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I use an electric buffer. I've been in the exact same situation, just with a Combine instead of a tractor. Farm equipment oxidizes WAY worse can cars do, and I wouldn't even attempt it without an electric buffe, unless the hood of the tractor is very small.

    I use a medium grit cutting cream combined with the buffing wheel, works great.
     
  5. Stomper

    Stomper ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ GMOTM Winner

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    Thanks for the reply's fellas:D

    I do have a electric buffer and I wouldn't tackle it with out one either. Bobby, it's a 7140 Magnum MFWD.
     
  6. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    i'll chime in mainly cuz i've buffed more boats and cars than i care to remember.. plus its on my mind cuz i just bought a new Makita buffer today.. :wink1:

    for heavy oxidation, a lacquer/orange compound is best.. 3M Super Duty is what is widely used these days...

    just bought a new gallon today myself for a sidejob on a Jeep... i'll be using it for my clear blend areas... best way to do that, sand your primed bodywork area, compound the surround paint so your strictly clear at the panel edges..

    but i digress... be aware heavy compounds swirl and need to be polished and glazed more thoroughly...

    most jobs can be tackled with a lighter, white, clearcoat style compound.. resulting in much less swirling.. there are many on the market with varying formulas...

    for the lightest polishing look to something like 3M's Finesse It. heavily used in the industry for light oxidation, swirl removal, polishing, etc...

    machine and hand glazes are very, very mild in the polish department, don't cut quite as well as Finesse and are generally used in its place sometimes for swirl removal... i rarely use them any more.. i'll use them occasionally on a single stage black, etc...

    i'll generally go orange or white, Finesse (do it twice for orange swirls) then some good carnuba wax....

    hope some of that was new to you :D
     
  7. rjfguitar

    rjfguitar 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    7140 Magnum....:thinking: I can't quite put my finger on it...but a Case International is bouncing around in the back of my head for some reason...
     
  8. Stomper

    Stomper ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ GMOTM Winner

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    Yep, that's it.
     
  9. Stomper

    Stomper ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ GMOTM Winner

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    Thanks,:D
     
  10. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Lots of new stuff there for me. I need you to clear something up, though- what's up with all the orange and white references? Does the industry use different colored pastes to denote cutting levels?
     
  11. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    basically...

    orange compounds have been going by the wayside for awhile now... you can still get them, Super Duty is readily available and probably be so for a long, long time. its just alot of the manufacturers have been dropping them from their product lines..

    they are often refered to as a lacquer compound, due to the need for a heavy cutting compound for production lacquer business's back in the day.. usually have that pumpkin color, but it can vary slightly..

    if i'm wetsanding anything, i'll usually at least go over it once with orange, for that initial cut.. then some finer white sometimes, then finesse, and wax... its a stepsaver. instead of wailing on it with a white clearcoat compound for 20 mins, ya hit it with orange quick, flip the pad, then white it and it cuts the time in 1/2... this can vary depending on techniques, with a secondary buff of orange with lighter pressure and higher speed you can get it just about as swirl-free as white..

    as far as white compounds go, they are often refered to as clearcoat compounds, but not always.. sometimes polishing compound, etc... the variation on white compound formula are much more varied...

    they can have varying amounts of petroleum product in them depending on manufacturer, brand, etc... what this does is allow the compound to stay "wetter" longer. whereas an orange compound will have no petroleum to it, making it dry off much quicker as you work it.

    there are advantages and disadvantage to that... its awesome for blend prep on cars, cuz it cuts great to allow clear to stick to it easily without fear of peeling and without petroleum in it, degreasing/dewaxing for paint is much simpler and safer..

    however being drier also makes it more difficult to buff the panel for long periods of time without putting more product on.. you'll also go thru more product per sq ft. tho its aggressive cutting helps make up for that...

    i've probably buffed over 3000 cars and 1500 boats over the years.. :doah: :haha: there are many, many variables, techniques and tricks to it...

    heck, i could right 2 pages on different buffer positioning techniques, pads, etc.. :o any questions, feel free..
     
  12. BowtieBlazer

    BowtieBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    resurected....comments on good/better buffing pads? orbital or 7" buffer whats your preferences? I like to use zymol as my top coat high carnuba wax, I prefer the hard wax over paste although its harder to find in hard wax form.
     
  13. pauly383

    pauly383 Daddy383 Staff Member Moderator

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    I always used nufinish when the Blazers hood starting turning white . Rub on , wipe off with dry towel . Went back to being tan .
     

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