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Proper way to put water into radiator...

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by PetaKane, Sep 6, 2002.

  1. PetaKane

    PetaKane 1/2 ton status

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    I heard something about cracking your block the other day. Don't remember what it was but now I wanna make sure I do it right. First I fill the radiator up with the truck turned off, then I turn it on and keep filling the radiator until the water quits going down, is this the right way and how much water will actually fit so I don't put too much in?
     
  2. Blazer1970

    Blazer1970 1/2 ton status

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    Do it just like you said. It is impossible to put too much in.
     
  3. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    You don't have to "crack" the block to put water in.
    And if the block is "CRACKED", then alot of water will go in /forums/images/icons/blush.gif /forums/images/icons/laugh.gif /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif /forums/images/icons/grin.gif
    What they were probably were referring to is the two plugs at the bottom of the block. Most are "fused" into the block and are tough to get out. It is a good Idea to remove them, clean the threads and gunk in the bottom of the block out (may require using a flexible pick) and installing drain cocks for easier flushing. This will get all/some/most of the old crap (water, antifreeze, rust, gunk, etc) out of the block, but if the plugs break/strip/etc is can be a pain. Sometimes the block is so cruddy, you remove the plugs and nothing comes out. That is when you stick something up in there to break up the crud.

    As far as adding water (actually should be 50/50 mix or so with antifreeze), you can do it with the motor cool/cold (definitely don't do it when it's hot), and running at idle. Add fluid until it tops off the radiator, let it idle and come up to temp, adding fluid as it lowers in the radiator. Top off (up to the full line) the reservoir, run it and keep an eye on the level (add if/when necessary). If you constantly keep adding fluid, then you have a leak somewhere (internal or external. An external leak should be easy to find, but an internal one can be tough (usually a blown head gasket and/or cracked head).
     
  4. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    If you wanna do your block and radiator a favor, make sure to use distilled water.
     
  5. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    I always drill a couple small ~1/8" holes in the thermostat to ease burping/filling
     
  6. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    trail only guys should run straight water with a lube/wetting agent added
    easier on the environment and it cools better
    boiling point is lowered though
     
  7. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    trail only guys should run straight water with a lube/wetting agent added
    easier on the environment and it cools better
    boiling point is lowered though

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Not if the trails are going to be covered with snow! One good freeze and goodbye block (I know freeze plugs are there for a reason, but I have never seen them prevent the block from cracking.....especially up here in N.E.).

    I don't remember where this guy was from, but if it's in a all warm climate, your statement is valid, but I wanted to make sure other's did not do that and have big $$$ problems.

    You are correct in warm climates and that it is environmentally "friendlier" to run straight H2O with some lubricant especially if a leak happens, but in cold climates (or where it will get cold), it is best to mix and not worry about it. If the environment concerns you (which it should concern all of us to an extent as it is where we wheel), you can use Sierra brand antifreeze (safer for the environment than conventional antifreezes).
     
  8. MontanaLifted

    MontanaLifted 1/2 ton status

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    You need to have some sort of an anitfreeze mixed in with the water. The anitfreeze not only changes the freezing point but also changes the boiling point. Antifreeze also won't evaporate out of your system. Anitfreeze also acts as a lubricant for your water pump so you don't burn it up.
    Calcium and other deposits are caused by water. Whether or not it's distilled just determines how fast this happens. Antifreeze also has agents in it to counter act the alkalinity of water.(alkalinity is what causes deposit forming so you counter it with an acid to make it neutral)

    Decide for yourself
     
  9. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Is the boiling point lowered enough to worry about? I've seen a chart (been awhile) somewhere (back of antifreeze jug?) that showed the mix ratio vs cold protection/boiling point, and the diff between 50/50 and 30/70 antifreeze/water was significant for cold protection, but very small on boiling protection.

    Pressure (radiator cap) affects boiling point much more than antifreeze.
     
  10. Blazer_Boy

    Blazer_Boy 1/2 ton status

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    Freeze plugs are actually used to remove the sand after the casting procees. Or so I've been told... Probably would explain why they never save the block in a freeze, /forums/images/icons/smirk.gif
     
  11. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Makes sense! /forums/images/icons/cool.gif
     
  12. MontanaLifted

    MontanaLifted 1/2 ton status

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    In regards to pressure caps:

    Yes, pressure caps, or we will just shorten that to mean "pressure", definitely effects the boiling point but no more or less than anitfreeze-(which we will just shorten to liquid)

    Pressure directly effects the boiling point of liquid.
    Alititude effects pressure which effects the boiling point of liquid.
    The chemical composition of the liquid determines the original boiling point before you add the other variables like Pressure or Altitude.

    Like you said the difference in freeze protection between 50/50 and 30/70 was significant.
    However you said the boiling point didn't change much. But if you took the antifreeze out all together I submit to you that the boiling point would be greatly changed.

    (and thus the world would stop spinning on it's axis /forums/images/icons/wink.gif )
     
  13. dyeager535

    dyeager535 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I disagree. Antifreeze does not help alter the boiling point of water, (significantly) and it DOES increase its INABILITY to absorb heat, or else removing it from the system would not decrease engine temps.

    Of course they are trying to sell their stuff, but even straight water is mentioned vs. glycol coolants: http://www.redlineoil.com/redlineoil/wwti.htm The other page I typically refer to has disappeared : (

    IIRC, pressure raises the boiling point of water 2* per 1 PSI...(13-16psi caps typical) 50/50 glycol adds something like 10* over waters 212*.
     
  14. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    antifreeze does just that 'anti freeze'
    it isnt needed in warm weather and actually hurts cooling
    you can buy additives, like the link that Dyeager posted, that act as a surfactant(wetting agent) and a lubricant without the negatives of glycol antifreeze

    I was suggesting it for trail vehicles as I know most wont change the fluid in their daily drivers more often then a rad or hose failure forces them to but perhaps in their toys they might look after it better
     
  15. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    if boiling was causing problems I would say the trouble is elsewhere
    I have seen caps up to 21psi, seems excessive to me
    the added cooling perhaps will offset the boiling point

    I am going to PM or email you an exerpt from a mustang paper on this subject
     
  16. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    i've got a boiling-over problem in my 91 camry, so should i try using a greater water/coolant ratio?
     
  17. m j

    m j 1/2 ton status

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    you should fix the problem not the symptom.
    is it a dead rad or a headgasket?
     
  18. amm888

    amm888 1/2 ton status

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    my uncle had everything checked and/or replaced that had to do with the cooling, but he couldn't solve the problem...
     
  19. Eric M.

    Eric M. 1/2 ton status

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    Very interesting article. Thanks for posting it. The only part that bothered my was the suggestion of a 23PSI rad cap. At 23 PSI I think you'll be blowing hoses and popping seams in your rad!But it was very interesting to see how poorly a 50/50 mix cools in relation to straight water. I'm gonna change the ration to 75/20 in all my rides. That should really help out with cooling. I don't really see any advantage to the Redline product for what we do. We get the lube for the water pump from the cooland and just about all of us are running cast iron blocks and heads so we don't need the corrosion protection for aluminum that Redline offers. Also, adding the Redline WaterWetter to an antifreeze mixture really doesn't do much for added cooling, changing your ratio would help more.

    If you haven't read the above Redlind posted article, check it out, it's good reading!

    Thanks again.

    Eric M.
     

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