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Question about Sanding my blazer.

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by JohnnyFresno, Feb 18, 2003.

  1. JohnnyFresno

    JohnnyFresno 1/2 ton status

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    I've never done any body work, and I want to prep my blazer for painting I would do all the prep and have someone do the paint for me. I was wondering if anyone had any tips on doing this, what kind of sander to use, ect.

    Thanks in advance for any info.
     
  2. Shaggy

    Shaggy 3/4 ton status

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    <font color="green"> You want to use a DA (dual action) sander to rough the current paint up. If the paint is in good shape then there's no reason to remove it all, just rough it up. That is unless you're putting bondo on, you never put bondo on top of paint, you want to put in on good clean roughed up metal. </font color>
     
  3. bigbluek20

    bigbluek20 1/2 ton status

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    DA with 400 grit. Man I wish I had the DA on my first few... took me forever with a block /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Word of caution... work out your paint shop ahead of time. Most won't touch a self prep'ed vehicle. Can't say I blame them... kind of like having a builder build a house on the foundation you put in. Prep is important and tough.

    Now, that said, if you can get a clean place, spraying isn't that hard. Visit your local DuPont dealer and they can get you set up (I have always used DuPont... as an amateur it has worked well for me).
     
  4. Judd

    Judd 1/2 ton status

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    I would advise a DA sander with 180 or 220 grit paper depending on what kind of condition your current paint is in. Go over the entire truck paying special attention to paint chips, rust spots and making sure you feather out any areas that you have gone to the metal. Once your done with the DA, blow the truck off and hit the spots where you have gone to metal with primer surfacer. I'm assuming that you don't have a gun and your primer will be from a can. If not, then throw a couple of medium/heavy coats of primer. I like DP90 {stuff is hard as a rock and non-porous}. Then when dry-start water sanding with 400 grit wet/dry. The 400 grit will show some sand scratches if you use only new paper so nub it off with a few sheets of the 400 but don't throw away the worn out paper. Use the worn out stuff for your finish sanding. I'm lazy and 600 grit makes for alot of elbow grease when sanding DP90. You can spray directly over the DP90 if it's topcoated within something like 24 hours.
     
  5. MudNurI

    MudNurI 1/2 ton status

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    I might be wrong- BUT isn't body work what either makes or breaks a paint job?
    Being that I'm the type to like a clean dent free rig, doing body work yourself, when you have said you have never done it before wouldn't be the right thing to do.

    I know my "body guy" wouldnt paint something without body work being done properly. The amount of time that it would take to do an adequate job would not be worth the money saved by doing it myself. If you do it, and get it painted, and it looks like crap, are you going to say "I got the paint job by X, he did a great job, but the prep/body work I did myself was crappy"....this is the reason my body guy is the way he is......

    what color are you planning on getting it painted?

    Brandy
     
  6. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    1.Scuff paint with Scotchbrite pad.
    2.Rattle
    3.Spray
    4.Repeat 2 and 3 until entire vehicle is covered and desired finish is achieved.

    /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     
  7. bigbluek20

    bigbluek20 1/2 ton status

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    All good advice. If you are stripping an entire area, you might use something as low as 100 grit (just don't get the metal too warm... warpage). For feathering, stick with the DA or a block... don't try to use a piece of sandpaper and your finger to work in... it will show. For big areas, you should use the self-etching primer. For rattle can, get good stuff.

    I have found for fixing blemishes, the gun-sprayed sandable fills MUCH better. Rattle cans are nearly worthless for filling (too thin).

    I would advice a trip to the library to get a book on autobody. That was how I got started (during high school)... learned a lot since then, bout paintin, wrenchin, and life /forums/images/graemlins/smile.gif As for paintin, the DA was still the biggest timesaver I ever used!

    If you know someone who has done it, it really helps to get their pointers. I was originally going to do prep and have someone spray, but a buddy talked me into doing it all myself... no regrets... complete job satisfaction.
     

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