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question on cam install & oil pump

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by solowookie, Mar 28, 2002.

  1. solowookie

    solowookie 1/2 ton status

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    ok guys...

    I don't recall there being a gasket between the cap & the oil pump, but I wanted to be sure.

    on the cam - after the cam is installed whats holds the cam in place? there is a pice that looks like it could bolt over the cam (surface that looks like a gasket would go there, and also two bolt holes). however, I do not remember removing anything off there, and don't have any bolts for this area. when I disassembled this engine I put everything in baggies, and labeled everything.

    so what this looks like is the cam is installed, and then the sproket bolts directly to the cam. am I off the wall here?
     
  2. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    There is no gasket used between the oil pump and main cap. Torque the oil pump bolt to 50 ft. lbs.
    Sounds like you have a 1987 and later block. If the engine is not a roller (which it shouldn't be if it is a truck engine and is stock) there will be 2 threaded holes on either side of the cam journal but nothing goes in them unless it is a roller cam. As far as what holds the cam in place, the timing chain and distributor hold it in place.
     
  3. solowookie

    solowookie 1/2 ton status

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    no it is not a roller cam, and I was almost 100% positive that there anything I pulled off of there. I thought I'd double check to make sure I still had my sanity intack! /forums/images/icons/tongue.gif LOL

    thanks again
     
  4. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

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    On a non-roller cam, it is actually the valve lifters that help hold it into place. Even though the cam lobes look flat, each one is actually just a slight bit larger on the rear edge, so the face of the lobe has a very slight slope. This is what keeps the lifters rotating in their bores and as a side benefit it pushes the cam towards the rear of the engine while it's running.

    Roller cams have flat faces on the lobes, required to make full contact with the roller on the bottom of each lifter. Since this doesn't help to retain the cam in the block, roller cams use either a hold down plate on the front of the block or a timing button inside the timing chain cover.
     
  5. solowookie

    solowookie 1/2 ton status

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    thanks - I've gotta get my oil pan cleaned & painted, and a few other parts so I can finish getting it assembled. not in a big hurry cuz there are a few parts I will not have until next week.
     

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