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Question on shock length/application & a brand preference..

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by MudNurI, Feb 5, 2003.

  1. MudNurI

    MudNurI 1/2 ton status

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    Getting ready to dump some money into the truck so it can be really a daily driver this summer...Have a few questions regarding shocks.

    As you know, I don't take this off road, so what I'm looking for are a comfortable ride, I have teh 4" skyjacker soft ride system, springs all around, and it's a good ride, but my shocks are not looking too pretty. I can't tell if they are shot, or good or what not. They were on the truck when I bought it, and I believe they were put on used...

    I've been looking through summit and jc whitney, trying to locate what I'm looking for, but I can't figure out if specific shocks will fit with the 4" suspension. Who makes an extended shock...how do I know what will fit?

    I do not want to go with Rancho's, only because of the horrible customer service we received from the company with John's lift kit.. I have no brand preference other than not using this one.

    ps. I did use the search feature, but couldnt' find anything that answered these questions...

    thanks
    Brandy
     
  2. Bubba Ray Boudreaux

    Bubba Ray Boudreaux 1 ton status

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    Check out Bilstein at Off Road Warehouse and this place,
    eshocks.

    Bilstein is a good, quality replacement shock that will have what you are looking for. You may have to call, but you'll find them.
     
  3. TorkDSR

    TorkDSR 1/2 ton status

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    grab some doetsch tech shocks. you can get them wrom west texas off-road or summit. seriously beefy. then bring the k5 to paragon for some testing /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
    Ryan
    [​IMG]
     
  4. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    dear gawd, trim those u-bolts down! /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    I must concer though, DTs are beefy and relatively cheap. WTO can hook ya up. /forums/images/graemlins/laugh.gif

    j
     
  5. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Brandy,

    A very good place to start will be to measure the existing shocks (eyelet-to-eyelet) to get a measurement of your "static shock length".... I don't trust ANY of the manufacturers "Fitment Guides".

    Once you know that number (and it will probably be different between the front and rear shocks) you can do some simple math to determine what you need. Typically, shock manufacturers only give you TWO pieces of information: Max Length (fully extended) and Min Length (fully compressed).....the number you REALLY want is the one in between (what I'll call MIDDLE-LENGTH!). If you average the MAX and MIN numbers together, you will get the MIDDLE length value....and that should be as close as possible to the measurements you took directly off your own truck.

    The idea is that the shock should have exactly half of it's travel available for compression, and half for extension. If you buy a shock that sits at it's midpoint when the truck is at rest....you will have done the best you can. This is a good solution for moderate lifts, and doesn't take much effort to solve.


    Caveat:

    The "ultimate" way to measure is to fully compress the suspension into the bumpstop, and measure the distance between the shock mounts. Then fully extend the suspension and measure again. (This is done with the existing shocks removed, so they don't limit your flex)

    The problem with this method (if your truck is flexy) is that you'll end up needing a shock that's too long to fit in the stock mounts, and you'll need to fab up a new way to attach them.



    If you're interested, I spent some time sorting all the Rancho 9000 shocks by their "MIDDLE-LENGTH" values, so if you send me the measurements you take, I can cross-reference them to a Rancho part # for you. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  6. TorkDSR

    TorkDSR 1/2 ton status

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    </font><blockquote><font class="small">In reply to:</font><hr />
    dear gawd, trim those u-bolts down!

    [/ QUOTE ] /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif right...when i start listening to peoples opinions, i may.

    it took WTO 2+ months to get me a set of DT's. i kept being told "in a week"

    it took summit 3 days.
    food for thought
     
  7. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    Gaberial LT shocks with VST are good road/offroad. They ride nice, and they react quick to road /terrain changes. They make them for trucks with up to 4" lift (except 1 tons) They are cheap too. Look in your JC Whitney book there is a listing for them in there for trucks with 4" lift. Or if there is a Carquest parts store around they carry the Gaberial shocks for lifted applications also.
     
  8. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    Hey greg, you theory is good except usually a suspension would give you twice as much droop than stuff, that is why at rest you should not have the middle value but min + 2/3 of difference.
    But that gets complicated for some, and as You said the optimum is real min and max and relocating to fit.
     

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