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R134 conversion

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by kihlj, Jun 12, 2002.

  1. kihlj

    kihlj Registered Member

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    I have seen several posts on how to convert over to R134. My question is there seems to be several different variations from spending $50-$300. I don't have a problem spending the $300 and doing it myself but if there is no need to spend $300 then why spend it. Which parts of the A/C system must absolutely be changed?

    Thanks,

    Jason
     
  2. shane74

    shane74 1/2 ton status

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    This is just my experience and opinion, so take it for what it is worth. I took my car (a GM with a similar type A/C setup as your blazer) to an A/C shop and had them evacuate it. That was free. Then I went down to the parts store and bought the retro-kit for $30 which included the new type fittings that thread onto your existing ones, a can of compressor lubricant, and 2 12 oz. cans of the 134A. I had to buy another can of the 134A to make sure that I had enough in the system. I then took the stuff home and converted it in about 10 minutes. I didn't swap out any parts or install anything other than the fittings that come in the retro kit. I have been running this set up for over 2 years w/ NO issues. Most parts stores will tell you that you need a new condenser and hoses etc., But when I contacted the manufacturer of the 134A they told me there was no reason to have to buy new parts unless the current system has a leak or broken part. I am very happy with my conversion, and it is VERY COLD! /forums/images/icons/smile.gif
     
  3. kihlj

    kihlj Registered Member

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    Did you put the 134A in yourself or have a shop do it?
     
  4. ftn96

    ftn96 1/2 ton status

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    More power to ya Bro. But my luck doesn't ru nthat good.

    To do it right you need to pull a vacum on the system adn get all the freon out. Then you need to remove the resevoir accumulator canister, then swap out the fittings and the seals and O-rings. Then remove the compressor and drain the oil out of it. Then replace the old accumulator/res with a new one, with all new seals adn fittings. Replace the compressor. Then draw a vacum on the system and let it hold for about 10-15 minutes adn see if it leaks down. If not you have no leaks. Then fill the system up with the 134. Probably about 3 to 3 1/2 cans. And find someone or take it somewhere to have the hi and low pressure checked.
     
  5. GMMANIAC

    GMMANIAC Registered Member

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    Doing the job right is what counts. To make the system work along time you need to make sure the system is flushed out and the o-rings changed. The R134a uses a synthetic based oil thats not compatible with the mineral oil used with the R12. Sure you may get away with only spending $30 for now, but when your compressor shells out the expense will be much greater. Evacuating the system is a must, if you don't the pressures will be too high and the R134a doesn't tolerate moisture or air as well as R12. If you live in a humid climate you need to evacuate the system for at least an hour. I've been doing these retros since the R134a first came out and I've seen alot of people try to shortcut the job only to do more damage then good. But thats just my 2 cents.
     
  6. Buff44

    Buff44 Registered Member

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    Hi, these other guy`s are right the green seals are different from the older black seals, which 134 atacks,flushing the system (NAPA)makes a good flush about $11.00 a Qt. is needed to purge the older oil and freon. If nothing else the accumulator/dryer cannister and orifice tube should be replaced,draining and flushing the compressor is a question for someone else, but reinstalling the proper amount of correct oil is imperitive,you dont have to do these things but are necessary for the system to live and operate properly, Good Luck,DWA
     
  7. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Can anyone explain the procedure for changing the seals in the dryer can? I'd like to fix my A/C myself. I'll get it evacuated if necessary, but I want to do the rest myself.
     
  8. 350S10NJ

    350S10NJ Registered Member

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    Why convert it?
    There is a new R 12 direct replacement called " Freeze 12" that is the same price as 134a.
    We have been using it in the shop since last year, and it works great
     
  9. kihlj

    kihlj Registered Member

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    This replacement for R12 who can put it in and where can I get it? I have heard that all the a/c shops will only put in R12 or R134a. Is this true or do you have to request the other stuff. Do you have to replace any parts to use the Freeze12? Someone on another post stated that the Freeze12 was highly flammable. Now, I am sure the other stuff is flammable also so is there any reason concern.

    Thanks,

    Jason
     
  10. 350S10NJ

    350S10NJ Registered Member

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    No need to change anything.
    Most real A/C shops should know about it, we get ours from a local tool and supply guy that comes around once a month kinda like the snap-on guy.
    He said it was in the chain auto stores too, Like Pep Boy's, Auto Zone.

    All freon is flammable.
     
  11. shane74

    shane74 1/2 ton status

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    I put it in myself. The kit makes it idiot proof.
     
  12. shane74

    shane74 1/2 ton status

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    Yup. I had the system evacuated/vacuumed by a shop before I put in the R134. I When I put the new engine in my wifes car, I somehow cracked one of the hoses going into the compressor so everything leaked out. I replaced both the hoses and had it leak checked by a buddy that does A/C for a living. Everything checked out ok, so I recharged it. Like I said in my first post, this is only MY experience. I was not trying to speak for all.
     
  13. shane74

    shane74 1/2 ton status

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    Ya didn't read my post too well did ya?? /forums/images/icons/wink.gif I had a shop evacuate, vacuum, and leak check the system before recharging it. The job is simple if you have access to the right tools/people. I think a lot of shops and pro's make it sound harder than it is. I wuz just trying to let the guy know its not that difficult and can be fairly inexspenive. I had a local shop that wanted to charge me over $1000 to do the system for me. I spent less than $100 for everything and I took it back to my buddy this year for him to check out. He said everything still looks great. BTW he is the head mechanic for a local Cadillac dealer, many certifications, and I have known him for several years both prefessionally and personally. I know he wouldn't mess around with this stuff since it is sooo expensive to have a shop repair "back yard mechanics" mistakes.
     

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