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radiator

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by shupach, Mar 25, 2001.

  1. shupach

    shupach 1/2 ton status

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    hey i just bought a radiator and where the two holes for the transmission are supposed to be are completely sealed. Any ideas on what i should do?

    phill
     
  2. UseYourBlinker

    UseYourBlinker 1 ton status

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    Where did you buy the radiator? Also did you tell them what year Blazer you had?

    <font color=blue> Yesterday was history,tomorrow is a mystery,and today is a gift. -Taproot- </font color=blue>
     
  3. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Probably came off a manual equipped truck. IMHO, you could just get a good quality (large) external cooler from the bone yard or the local parts house. Usually these are used in addition to the radiator but a large one positioned in front of the radiator with good air flow should be sufficient. Might want to call a trans shop just to be sure unless someone else here knows for sure...

    Bad Dog

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, NP205, D60/C14, 4.56
    Coming soon: 4" lift, 40" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  4. shupach

    shupach 1/2 ton status

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    i looked at the receipt and the radiator was a 4 row for a 76 PU w/ a 454 and not a 400. i called a left a message saying i wanted one that worked.

    phill
     
  5. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Just a little FYI- It's not a good idea to cool your tranny exclusively with an aux. tranny cooler. You can actually OVERcool your transmission this way. Your ATF needs to reach a certain temperature to be viscous enough to reach all those nooks and crannies inside the tranny. If you bypass the radiator, the fluid can get pretty cool by the time it comes back in the return line, especially in colder weather.

    <font color=red>PHOTO ALBUM-</font color=red> <A target="_blank" HREF=http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798>http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798</A>.......<font color=blue>TRUCK & HIKING PICS</font color=blue>
     
  6. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Wow, never thought that would be the problem. I was concerned that the BTU exchange would not be sufficient rather than too efficient. Are you sure about that? BTW, higher temperatures lead to less viscosity.

    Bad Dog

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, NP205, D60/C14, 4.56
    Coming soon: 4" lift, 40" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  7. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Yes, I'm almost positive that you can do damage by running a tranny too cool. Every vehicle I've seen with an aux. tranny cooler has also remained plumbed through the rad as well, and all the mechanics at work insist that this is the proper way to do it.

    I also agree that extreme temperatures can lead to viscosity breakdown, however, the COOLER the fluid (whether it be motor oil, gear oil, or tranny fluid) the LESS viscous it is. Try pouring a bottle of 10w30 at 10 degrees, then letting it warm up inside for an hour and pouring from it again. You'll notice that the viscosity has increased rather then decreased.............


    <font color=red>PHOTO ALBUM-</font color=red> <A target="_blank" HREF=http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798>http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798</A>.......<font color=blue>TRUCK & HIKING PICS</font color=blue>
     
  8. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I just checked your profile and saw that you're in down in AZ. Now I can understand your disbelief- You probably don't see the low temps that I do. Up here we can easily drop to -35' celcius(-31' farenheit) for a couple weeks at a time during the winter. 10w30 won't even pour from a bottle at those temps!!!!! Tranny fluid gets pretty stiff, too, and the cooler lines to the rad become "heater" lines to help the tranny warm up.

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  9. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    I 2nd that, Trans fluid needs to get up to temp to operate properly, they also need be able to boil out any water that may have acumulated (spelling?) over night. More inmportant for the guys that see some cold weather, but still needs some consideration. I like to see trans temp the same as t-stat/coolant temps, not to cool/not to hot.
    As far as the lack of cooler line in th radiator, donno what I'd do. Depends, can they take it back and give you the right one? or can this one be made to work?

    Twiztid
     
  10. BadDog

    BadDog SOL Staff Member Super Moderator Author

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    Your right about me not thinking about the really cold extremes in some areas. I'm so used to constantly fighting overheating that I didn't even consider that the situation might be different in colder climates. Sorry for the oversight, I guess I have tunnel vision. I never imagined a case where auto trans temps could be too low without warming by the radiator. Oh well, I guess it's a good thing I qualified my statement with "call a trans shop just to be sure unless someone else here knows for sure". [​IMG]

    However, unless I am confused here, thicker oil is considered more viscus which implies to me that colder oil is more viscus. www.dictionary.com defines viscosity and viscous as:

    viscosity n : resistance of a liquid to sheer forces (and hence to flow)

    viscous adj 1: having a relatively high resistance to flow [syn: syrupy] 2: having the properties of glue [syn: gluey, glutinous, gummy, mucilaginous, pasty, sticky, viscid]

    That is why I said, "higher temperatures lead to less viscosity".


    Bad Dog

    85 K30 CUCV, 350 TBI, TH400, NP205, D60/C14, 4.56
    Coming soon: 4" lift, 40" tires, massive cutting, shorter wb and rear overhang.
     
  11. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hmmmmmmmmmmmmmm.....................I guess my thinking is a little screwed up- I always thought that the term viscous referred to the INCREASE in flowability of an oil.[​IMG][​IMG]

    What's the term used to describe that?

    Sorry, Baddog, looks like I'M the one on the doghouse tonight!!!!!!!!!!!!![​IMG]

    <font color=red>PHOTO ALBUM-</font color=red> <A target="_blank" HREF=http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798>http://albums.photopoint.com/j/AlbumList?u=1289798</A>.......<font color=blue>TRUCK & HIKING PICS</font color=blue>
     
  12. DMK

    DMK 1/2 ton status

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    Check again, there is 2 plugs in the holes and were painted over making it appear solid, all aftermarket radiators should have the holes.
     

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