Dismiss Notice

Welcome To CK5!

Registering is free and easy! Hope to see you on the forums soon.

Score a FREE t-shirt and membership sticker when you sign up for a Premium Membership and choose the recurring plan.

Rear Dic Brake installation Questions

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by gassman, Apr 3, 2001.

  1. gassman

    gassman 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2000
    Posts:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Quincy Cailf, Plumas County
    Installing Dic Brakes on a 14 bolt and want to know what is better, Calipers at the top behind the axle, Top in front of axle or under front or back. Wheel studs heads don't fit into recess groove on back of rotors they are to big but studs fit good in the hole, should they set in groove also. I think so but not sure? What is runout and how do I check it. Kit is from TSM and they say it should be .005 or less. Thought I would ask, Don't what to screw anything up with the brake system.
     
  2. Blazer79

    Blazer79 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2000
    Posts:
    1,816
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Guatemala, Central America
    I think the best position for the calipers is that in which you can bleed them properly. Remember air will go up and fluid down. Insall them so that the bleeder screw is on top, where the air would be.

    Hope this helps.

    <font color=blue>//////
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://blazer79.coloradok5.com>http://blazer79.coloradok5.com</A>
    </font color=blue>[​IMG]
     
  3. gassman

    gassman 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2000
    Posts:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Quincy Cailf, Plumas County
    Thank's Blazer79 didn't think about that.
     
  4. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

    Joined:
    May 9, 2000
    Posts:
    8,126
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    FL
    I have also pondered this because you see alot of vehicles with the calipers mounted in different places...

    Blazer79 makes a good point, but what about the other positions? IS one better than the other?


    <font color=green><A target="_blank" HREF=http://emmett.coloradok5.com>http://emmett.coloradok5.com</A></font color=green>[​IMG]
     
  5. HarryH3

    HarryH3 1 ton status Author

    Joined:
    May 31, 2000
    Posts:
    10,384
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Georgetown, TX
    I just ground the edge of the heads of each stud just enough to seat in the machined hole in the back of the rotor. Those studs are huge, so taking a few thousandths off of the outer edge of the head won't make much difference. They sure ain't gonna pull through the rotor! TSM sells rotors that have those holes machined out larger, but I wanted to be able to buy an off-the-shelf rotor if I damaged one.

    The braking efficiency isn't affected by what position you mount the caliper in. But if you mount it anywhere other than with the bleeder pointing straight up, then you'll have to remove the calipers from their brackets to bleed them properly. But mounting them with the bracket sloping up at a 45 degree angle will get them up away from obstacles. Since you don't need to bleed the brakes too often, then getting them up out of the way is probably your best bet.

    Shawn swapped his calipers from side to side and mounted them upside down in order to keep the parking brake levers up as high as possible. There's a tech article, with pictures, on it somewhere, but I can't locate it right now. [​IMG]

    The "runout" that they're talking about is lateral runout, or how much the rotor wobbles from side to side as it rotates. You need a dial indicator to measure this. You place it against the rotor face and then rotate the rotor as you watch to see how much the indicator moves. They're saying that any reading of more than .005 is out of spec.

    <font color=black>HarryH3 - '75 K5</font color=black>
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://ThunderTruck.ColoradoK5.com>http://ThunderTruck.ColoradoK5.com</A>
    It's a great day to be alive...
     
  6. KRAZIE87K5

    KRAZIE87K5 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2001
    Posts:
    3,369
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    I agree with placing the calipers for bleeder positioning. Calipers are often placed differently, but oposite each other so that the bleeders can be relative. IE. sure they are on opposite sides, but the bleeders are at the same level.

    Second, how much was your conversion kit from TSM? Do these folks have a webpage? I will soon be working on my 14FF, and am dreading the measurments of the drums. I am sure they will come up short and have to be replaced. If the cost of the conversion is close to the same price as new drums/shoes/wheel cylinders/etc. then I would just convert. Thanks for any input. Also, how is the install? Difficult or easy?

    <font color=red> Check out my rig @ </font color=red>
    <A target="_blank" HREF=http://24.10.209.54/bigolk5.htm>http://24.10.209.54/bigolk5.htm</A> [​IMG]
    <font color=red> I Love My Blazer! </font color=red>
     
  7. gassman

    gassman 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2000
    Posts:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Quincy Cailf, Plumas County
    The kit was $485.00 with shipping to Calif. Everything to do the job but proportioning valve and wheel studs. Skip at TSM said to run the blazer first to see if I need the valve or not. Also I talked to skip last week and he said that their web site was down. You can call him at 303-688-6882
     
  8. gassman

    gassman 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2000
    Posts:
    131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Quincy Cailf, Plumas County
    HarryH3 Thank's for the infor. Think I can tackle the job now.
     

Share This Page