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rear ends????? help

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by sanddragon2004, Feb 26, 2003.

  1. sanddragon2004

    sanddragon2004 Registered Member

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    first and for most, this site is awesome! although i own a suburban, i think this is a great site from what i have seen so far.

    Now my question. i have an 89 1/2 ton sub, and it has this tiny arse 10 bolt axle in it. I was wondering if any one new if their was a 12 bolt that comes in a 6 lug axle? also, how well do these things hold up? my expereicene has always been with corp 14bolts or dana 60s. is their a 6 lug axle that will hold up to 35" tires?
     
  2. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    A lot of 12 bolts came in 6 lug, they aren't that hard to find. They hold up somewhat better than 10 bolts. For something so heavy (trust me, I know, we drive the same thing), if you're trying to upgrade, then UPGRADE. I went to the 14 bolt just because I wanted nothing to break on me. A 14 bolt would cost less than a 12 bolt and is a lot stronger. 35" tires can last on 6 lug axles, but it depends what it's under and what you do with it. 35's will last on a 10 bolt under a suburban if you do nothing but drive it lightly on the street only. Some 14 bolt axles came in 6 lug form, but you have to look for them. They would be the ultimate 6 lug upgrade next to doing the custom job of switching over a 14 bolt FF, which someone on the site is doing.
    But if you want 35's and do more than drive on the street, I'd go with a 14 bolt...
     
  3. sanddragon2004

    sanddragon2004 Registered Member

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    thanks for the advice, hey btw, do you have any pics of yours?
     
  4. muddysub

    muddysub 1 ton suburban status Staff Member Moderator GMOTM Winner

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    yeah a 14 bolt semi floater would be a good upgrade for you. i just removed the 14bsf from under my 89 3/4 ton suburban to make way for a 14bff with a detroit. but it's 8-lug. they came in 6 lug, they're a little harder to find but it shouldn't be that bad. oh and i have pics of my 89 gmc suburban in the link in my signature line. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif /forums/images/graemlins/burb.gif
     
  5. XHitman396

    XHitman396 1/2 ton status

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    quick question, what is the difference between a semi-floater, and a full floater??? i see this used all the time, but have never known the difference, thanks...
     
  6. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    I have "before" pics only right now, gonna go take some shots of it flexing and things, but I need cash and time...
    click on my name and go to my homepage, there'll be a link to webshots...
    A semi-floater uses the axle bearings the axle rides on in the ends of the tubes to support the weight of the truck. Thus, the axleshafts are dealing with both the weight of the truck and the power delivered to the wheels.
    Full-floater axles put flanges that have bearings in them at the end of the tubes. The axleshafts are then removable and bolt to the flange. The advantage is that the axleshaft now only deals with power from the engine instead of also handling vehicle weight because vehicle weight is now supported by the flange at the ends of the axle tubes. This puts less stress on the axleshaft and permits the axle to carry heavier loads.
    The Semi-floating 14 bolt is an upgrade from the 10 bolt because of its larger c-clips, larger ring and pinion, 33 spline axles, and that the axleshafts now have two bearings to support weight instead of one like in the 10 bolt.
     

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