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Rear Lift Springs (Stiff)

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by Leadfoot, Jan 3, 2002.

  1. Leadfoot

    Leadfoot 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    I was looking at the article in the tech section that lists the different 4" lift spring manufacturers and there respective spring rates. I want as stiff as I can get in the rear for pulling, (and since it's not a car, I don't need it to ride like one). The Warn springs (which I think are/were Black Diamond) were listed as the stiffest, but I cannot find them anywhere (started at Warn.com and then searched the internet). I am looking for those or the strongest available NOW. Who has the highest rate springs for the rear (I would assume those who make the stiffest for the front would also make the stiffest for the rear) that are Currently available and from whom.

    Thanks in advance.

    See my rig at <a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/Leadfoot> click here </a>
     
  2. muddin4fun

    muddin4fun 3/4 ton status

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    I'm getting Rough Country rear springs. The spring rating is one of the highest, but they ride really well and flex really well. I've got the front springs and they're awsome!
    I got Rough Country originally cause when I tow, I tow a car hauler with a fullsize truck or a car or the GMC project and they work really well.

    <font color=blue>Answers: $1, Short: $5, Correct: $25, dumb looks are still free.</font color=blue>

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  3. BurbinOR

    BurbinOR 3/4 ton status

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    Warn discontinued the Black Diamond line - tho I heard someplace another mfg bought it. Not sure who.

    The whole spring rate calculation is unclear to me. Seems when the manufacturers publish their spring rates, I wonder if there is a standard way to measure it? So take their published spring rates with a grain of salt. I have the Tuff Country HD rear springs (and HD fronts) in a 4" lift and they are pretty stiff, but ride well. Might check with Stephen Watson at ORD for his input.

    <font color=blue>'79 ONE TON TPI K5 - See it at---&gt;<a target="_blank" href=http://www.blazzinor.rockcrawler.com>www.blazzinor.rockcrawler.com</a>
     
  4. shaggyk5

    shaggyk5 1/2 ton status

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    i saw the formula for calculating spring rate somewhere, not sure if it was the web or a mag, but it was likr the thickness of the leaves x the length x the # of leaves, or something like that. it explained this so you could find out exactly what you have...

    -matt
    <font color=purple> "Stuff's only good for 2 things, degreasing engines and killing brain cells"</font color=purple>
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  5. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    I feel the same way! I called around when buying my second set of front springs(before CK5 had the rates published) I called jsut about every spring Mfg to see what their rates were.. A few mfgs just popped up a number and that was it, but the majority of mfg's said I have to be concerned witht he spring rate and the method used to test the springs. They said there were a few wasy to measure it that would give me inaccurate measurements and rates....

    Mike

    <font color=green>"My K5 is purdyur than your sister!"</font color=green>

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  6. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch 1/2 ton status

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    All that has been said thus far is true about spring rates. I would look into the HD Superlift and HD skyjacker lines. They are about as stiff as you can get and are actually made to be abused by towing, hauling, etc. My choice would be Skyjackers as I think they are a better quality then the Superlift stuff, but that is just IMO.

    -Mikey
    1987 Chevy K5 Blazer- 350 TBI
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  7. Greg72

    Greg72 "Might As Well..." Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Shaggy (&amp; others)

    Here is the formula if you really want to torture yourselves!!!

    Leaf Spring Rate = (WN/12) x (1000T/L)^3

    W = Width of Leaves (in)
    N = Number Of Leaves in the pack
    T = Thickness of 1 Leaf (in)
    L = Length of Spring (in) eye-to-eye measurement
    12 = Constant for Leaf Springs

    The result you get is a spring rating in Lb/Inches.....that is: the amount of weight that will be required to compress the spring 1 inch.

    I would agree that it's almost impossible to compare the published rates from the various manufacturers...BUT if you took exact measurements of each spring pack you were interested in and ran them through the "calculator" listed above, you would at least be able to sort them by stiffness in a "relative sense"....since you would be getting the number the same way on each spring.

    If someone REALLY wants to geek out....I have an Excel spreadsheet that does all the math for these calculations.




    -Greg72

    '72 K5 Blazer - 427BB/TH350/NP205/6" Lift/35x12.50's
    <font color=blue>See it here: </font color=blue><a target="_blank" href=http://coloradok5.com/gallery/albun38>http://coloradok5.com/gallery/albun38</a>
     

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