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Rear Pinion Seal

Discussion in '1969-1972 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by BIgJon, Apr 3, 2001.

  1. BIgJon

    BIgJon Registered Member

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    Have any of you ever done a pinion seal on the corporate twelve bolt which comes in a 72 Blazer? Mine is leaking so bad that the entire underside from the pinion on back is covered with gear oil. I wanted to make sure it is not too difficult before I tear it apart. Does anyone have some pointers or problems to look out for?
    Thanks,
    BigJon
     
  2. Blazer1970

    Blazer1970 1/2 ton status

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    Old Mission, MI
    You want to get the nut back exactly in the same position when you put it back together, so count the number of threads exposed, and mark the nut and the pinion shaft so that you can put it back where it was. Use a big pipe wrench to hold the outside of the yoke, and get a socket that fits the nut with a long cheater bar to ease getting it loose. If the yoke has a groove worn in where the seal rides, the new seal will leak unless you address the problem. You either have to get a new yoke, or get a shaft repair sleeve (speedy sleeve), which is available at the auto parts store.

    Tim

    70 Blazer CST 4X4 350 SM465 NP205
    87 Burb 4X4 350
    01 GMC 2500HD 4X4 Duramax/Allison
     
  3. Steve_Chin

    Steve_Chin 1/2 ton status

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    In addition to what Tim posted, you will need a lip seal puller and a tubular seal driver.

    Note that the first part of Tim's post is *extremely* important. You must keep the pinion bearing preload exactly where it was before you removed the yoke. If the yoke needs to be replaced, that throws the whole concept of marking the nut position out the window. The FSM states that you should use a torque wrench to measure how much force it takes to *just* get the unloaded axles moving (in inch*pounds), then tighten the pinion nut until you reach that value. Note that it will be a different value with wheels on vs. wheels off.
     

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