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Rebuild Engine on the cheap ?

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by TX Mudder, Oct 13, 2001.

  1. TX Mudder

    TX Mudder 1/2 ton status

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    I have a 350 block loaded on my engine stand. I was told the engine had been rebuilt within the last 2 years.
    I have the heads and the pan off. The bores have some rust on them due to sitting in my tool shed for some time with the heads off. But there is NO appreciable ridge at the top of the bores so it can't have too much mileage can it?
    The crank looks good, but I plan to pull a few caps and check the bearings. I also plan to check crank endplay (have to buy a dial indicator.)
    The cam looks fine, but I didn't take it out, it's still in the block. Looking at it through the lifter bores. It seems to me that I can get away with cleaning the surface rust and just running this bottom end with a new oil pump and timing chain. Is there anything I need to check to give me a better clue as to the condition?
    Now, I bought heads from a ck5 member and he said they were recently went through at the machine shop and had new valve seats placed. Then I let them sit in the tool shed and they got rusty too (I hate the Gulf Coast rust.) I'm not concerned about the rust on the exhaust side, but the intake side needs to be clean for good air flow, right? Could the rust have messed up anything internally or would they be OK to run?
    If my guesses are correct, I can get buy with a new gasket set, timing chain, oil pump, pushrods, and lifters. I have everything else.
    I want to run this 2-bolt engine for a while until I can rebuild my 350 4-bolt that's knocking. That one i will send to the machine shop to be ;leaned and honed and I plan on a 383 crank and Vortec heads. But I don't want the truck to be down for the months it will take me to build up the 383 Vortec (time and money constraints.)
    Any advise?
    -- Mike

    <font color=blue> The mud's on it to hide that it's more than one color.[​IMG]
     
  2. twenty_below0

    twenty_below0 1/2 ton status

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    sounds like you know pretty much what to do, I would suggest turning the crank till the #1 cylinder was down at the bottom and gettin a hone and running it through the cylinder few good licks at high rpm's, then cleanin it thoroughly!! with brake cleaner or something, this will get the sm. pitts out that the rust is surely making as we speek, then proceed to do the rest of the cylinders and use a hone that has all the little wires with the balls on the end of them to hone it, not the adjustable type, adjustable type sucks big time then coat evey thing with oil, (wipe it down) so to prevent the thing from rusting again, done this with old junkyard motors and got another 30,00 out of them for little money, GOOD LUCK
     
  3. twenty_below0

    twenty_below0 1/2 ton status

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    OW. one more thing when you put the intake on DONT use the little rubber seals that come in the kit, use silicone on the front and back because as all old school mechanics know they WILL leak, just put a nice bead about 1/4" tall across the front and back then let it sit for about 20 min. to get tacky then carefully install the manifold, this will not leak if done carefully , done this on many engines and NEVER have problems if you use the seals you will guaranteed, might be awhile but it will leak!! GOOD LUCK
     
  4. Grim-Reaper

    Grim-Reaper 3/4 ton status Author

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    Ahh you might get away with the hone trick you might not. I would not count on getting 100k out of the motor but might be able to run it for a while. I would look at new bearings and I would pull the pistons before running a hone and look at new rings. If you spun the engine over the rust then you have already comprimised the rings sealing surface. The hone is the important part. Rings seat to the hone and they are set to the original hone when it was rebuilt. Rings and bearings are not that expensive and would make the engine last longer and have a better chance at sealing properly after you run a hone through it. Also disassembling it will make sure there is no hidden damage before you go and drop it in you vehicle to find it has a spun bearing or a rod knocking from a bad bearing or a wrist pin problem.

    I don't need no damn shop manual, I got a pornographic memory.
    <a target="_blank" href=http://communities.msn.com/OffroadK5s>communities.msn.com/OffroadK5s</a>
    75 Jimmy, Dollar
    Grim-Reaper
     
  5. twenty_below0

    twenty_below0 1/2 ton status

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    Grim is right that is the correct way to do the job and in the long run better off but if you are truely broke and need to spend as little as possible than the hone trick is a TEMPORARY fix and it does work I,ve done it, for another 30,00 or so if everything else is tight and good cond.,Mains,rods etc. if the mains look good than you can also just drop the pistons and put a set of new rings approx. 25.00 then you need to check for warpage and the ring groove etc. but that way you could get a proper honeing of the cylinders and if you run a quality set of GAP-less rings you will improve your compression and get better M.P.G. but they cost about 125.00 to 170.00 a set through P.A.W. possibly cheaper some where else I will help any way possible if you have any more questions as will Grim I'm sure,........ he is very knowlegable!!!!
     

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