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Received my D60 cross over arms today:)

Discussion in 'OffRoad Design' started by harry, Aug 1, 2001.

  1. harry

    harry 1/2 ton status

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    I received my pitman and steering arm in the mail today for my D60 cross over steering. They are very nice and beefy. It was a piece of cake to switch the cap and put the arms on. The only hard thing is removing the studs from the drivers side. I had to use an impact to bind the nuts together enough to get them out. If you don't have an impact you might want to buy new studs for the passenger side off Stephen. I shopped around and the cheapest I could find "Moog" tie rod ends in San Diego CA was about $100 for the set. If you wanted to buy a cheaper brand you could probably get away with spending $60. I plan on making my tie rod out of a piece soild round. My cousion who owns a machine shop is going to bore and tap it for me. I'll let you guy know how it turns out. I whish I owned a digital camera so I could show pictures.

    Thank you very much Sephen for answering all my questions so patiently.

    One more thing, I own a first generation K5 and there will be plenty of room between my new steering rod and my stock cross-member.

    harry
    69k5
     
  2. Triaged

    Triaged 1/2 ton status

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    Does he cousion have the left hand tap to do the tie rod? I would think that would be hard to come by.

    '71 Blazer CST w/ a 400sbc, 4" lift, 36" Supper Swampers, and alot of rust
     
  3. harry

    harry 1/2 ton status

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    He has a handfull of them. Just have to hope he has the correct one.

    harry
    69k5
     
  4. DERBINATOR

    DERBINATOR 1/2 ton status

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    Why are you using solid stock for the tie rod. I've been told that tubing is actully better then solid. Not exactlly sure if it is stronger or if it is because it is less likely to bend if it gets hit.
    Anybody know for sure? Or am I just rambeling.
     
  5. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    Glad they worked out well for you!
    For the draglink, we'll be using tubing, it's lighter, easier to drill/ream/thread, and plenty strong. I remember seeing some technical info on strength of tubing vs solid in torsion and bending, but it's been a while and it's not part of my knowledge base anymore.


    Making the world better, one truck at a time.
    SW-ORD
     
  6. ChadH82

    ChadH82 1/2 ton status

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    For the studs can you not just buy longer grade 8 bolts and bolt it right on? If not I must have a problem. I just left the driver side arm on and got 2" bolts for the passenger side. Is there anything wrong with this?

    Chad
     
  7. Sub_Versive

    Sub_Versive Registered Member

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    What about using tubing inserts like these at the chassis shop? http://chassisshop.com/npta.html Might be easier or cheaper than finding a left hand tap. Ideas? Not selling them, just looking for the best methods within my means...
     
  8. Stephen

    Stephen 1/2 ton status Moderator Vendor

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    Inserts of some sort are one of the fab tricks we've been using quite a bit lately and would like to put in the catalog. At this point, most draglink material is pretty thick due to bending the thing, so we find it a lot more efficient to thread the tube directly. With an insert, you end up with a pretty large diameter for the tube due to having to have enough beef around the threads to weld it in without messing up the threads. That would require chasing the threads with the tap you were trying to avoid buying!

    We recommend using studs with our arm since the top has countersunk holes to accept a conical nut for a little more centering force. Bolts are often fine, but they do have problems with tearing out the top threads if you're not careful tightening them against the spring force, and our arm is built with hole diameters matching the factory studs, so bolts rattle a little in the holes. In theory, the friction of the clamping force is what holds it all together, but theory often jumps out the window with a lot of stress and vibration, so the studs are nice to have.

    Making the world better, one truck at a time.
    SW-ORD
     

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