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Roll cage

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by JunkYardCrawler, Nov 2, 2000.

  1. JunkYardCrawler

    JunkYardCrawler 1/2 ton status

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    I'm in prosses of designing a roll cage. and was woundering if it would be better to go to the fram or what. and iff i o go to the frame what would be the best way? strait through the floor to the frame. or to brackets wellded to the frame. i know that i sould use some kind of bushing between the body and the cage. i was just woundering what would be the best place to atach it?

    Well as it gose it gose and under it rolls heavey rubber bouncing on a head.
    (hey i'm a poet)
     
  2. Gold Rush

    Gold Rush 1/2 ton status

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    I know everyone says to goto the frame. I thought the same thing until one day when deciding how to make my cage I realized the factory went to the body only. My cage is welded to the stock roll bar across to the front and then down along the dash to the floor. I then added cross bars for support. I believe it will withstand a decent rollover. The only way to do any better than mine is to build a complete tube frame and tie it into a complete cage. That's just my $.02 and I'd be glad to send pictures since they aren't on my website yet.

    David 75K5
    http://www.goldrush.coloradok5.com

    [​IMG]
     
  3. nyyef

    nyyef 1/2 ton status

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    remember the k5 has kind of a built-in roll bar in the side pillars. its pretty strong.
    if you are just a rock crawler, the body alone would protect the occupants pretty well if it rolls (and i mean just a roll over)about one complete roll.
    a bar or simple cage bolted to the floor will hold up better, but the body is thin sheet metal and if the body mounts rip out or break then the bar or cage has no solid foundation. but it will protect the passengers in a accident or a couple of rolls on the highway.
    a cage bolted directly to the frame or with brackets will definatley protect the occupants in just about anything. the frame and the cage have made a complete cage/box, and will absorb the impact. you will find, in a bad roll over/accident, that everything will fly off the truck except the frame and cage, and hopefully you.

    just my humble input.

    Knife.
    knife.coloradok5.com
     
  4. Scott Ellinger

    Scott Ellinger Registered Member

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    When I do a major cage, it doesn't matter if it goes to the body or the frame. What I mean by major cage, though, is at least two hoops, often three, stringers, diagonals, floor bars, shoulder bars, dash bars... a major cage, is usually around 60-100 feet of tube. I've got about 60 feet in the eight point cage in my '86 *Toy* mini truck. Got a Ranger rolling out of the shop this weekend, with over 100 feet of tube in it, and the cage still isn't complete.

    But why doesn't it matter if it goes to the frame?
    I use floor and door bars, just above the floor plates, whenever I can. Then add seat loops, and attach the belts and seats, to the cage. The floor bars keep the cage from pushing through the floor even if the floor plates do push through, basically keeps the floor away from the occupants. The hoops, stringers, etc., keep the rocks, trees, and body shell away from the occupants.

    If you're rolling hard enough for frame detachment to be an issue, who cares if you're attached to the frame, body, or just the cage; if you're enclosed in a steel cocoon of tube, the truck can disintegrate around you, and you'll just be on a wild ride.

    That said, if you go over more than about three or four times, it starts to not matter if you get beaten up externally anyway; the human body isn't designed for the violent shaking involved in a serious multi-roll crash.

    Having cut up a Chevy truck, I would be very leery of expecting the A or B pillars to hold up much in a rollover. May help a little, but don't forego a bar or cage because "the pillars are pretty strong". Yeah, a soft, easy, slow roll onto one door, won't likely smash in the roof... but if it's hard enough to *get* the truck onto the roof, it's probably hard enough to do serious structural damage to the roof.

    I guess my point is, regardless of where you get a cage, assuming it's properly constructed, your safety is worth more than the few hundred bucks a cage usually costs.

    --scott
    http://www.rockstomper.com
     
  5. Michael

    Michael 1/2 ton status

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