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Saddle tanks on a burb?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by Pookster, May 10, 2005.

  1. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    May seem like a rather odd question but.. would saddle tanks fit under a burb?
     
  2. dleroy43

    dleroy43 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I have thought about it, but I dont think there is enough room under it. Being a long wheel base the rockers scrape pretty often and having a tank there problly wouldnt be too good. IMO. If its for a towrig, I think it could be interesting with all three tanks. :frown1: :crazy: :o :( :eek: :eek1: :yikes: :1zhelp: I gota pee!!
     
  3. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    Lol, its a 2wd burb, I dont think its going offroading anytime soon. I just wanted/need some supplimental tanks to fit more fuel
     
  4. mini_mull

    mini_mull 1/2 ton status

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    Wow, 40gal isn't enough? Are you driving cross continent? :D
     
  5. dremu

    dremu Officious Thread Derailer Premium Member

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    Sheeeit, a 40 gallon tank only goes 300, maybe 400 miles -- least on my '90 V2500 with a TH400 it did.

    -- A
     
  6. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    I've looked at it. The Sub's floor doesn't appear to leave enough room for the tanks. You could probably get them in there, but the brackets might not work as the tanks would have to be really low.

    At least that is what it looke dlike w/o actually holding a tank in place.
     
  7. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    no no, I have a diesel 2wd burb with the 700R4 and 3.42 gears-sucker pulls out a nominal 20-21mpg. with a 40 gallon tank thats about 800 miles of cruise radius.

    (driving cross continent)- no no, not my intention, not that I havent done it before- I picked up this truck to also convert over to run on waste vegetable oil- So I wanted to carry as much fuel as possible (more fuel=less money to auctally fill up at the pump). Another 40 gallons would have been sweet. If it isnt a possibility, I might have to just tow a mini trailer along... Im already running on a mix 80% veggie, 20% diesel. Still a little cold , so I really should have kept it at 50/50...

    Its kinda weird to say it, but the burb just doesnt have enough space... :D

    Oh yeah.. about the pissing part... I just simply attach a tube to my......


    Ok, maybe not. I do end up stopping almost every 1.5-2 hrs just to take a leak, do some push ups, etc. My friend says I pull over at every rest stop though just to take a leak from all the coffee I drink. :crazy:
     
  8. mikayak390

    mikayak390 Registered Member

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    not to go off topic, but I heard about the diesel /veggie oil mix once and though it was a joke. does it work, and where should I look for information.

    Thanks.
     
  9. mini_mull

    mini_mull 1/2 ton status

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    Sweet, I've always wondered if anyone actually did that on a regular basis. What happens if you run on 100% veggie? Do you have to be careful about it turning rancid, or does that not really matter? Sure would be cool to be able to store an infinite amount of fuel at your house and have no gov't safety standards to worry about or just worrying about blowing your house up. How much do you pay per gallon? And do you smell like McDonalds? :D
     
  10. sweetk30

    sweetk30 professional hooker Premium Member

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  11. Jonny-K5

    Jonny-K5 1/2 ton status

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    i remember seeing a tv show that was about alt. fuels.
    one of the segments was about the guy who drives is vehicle on cooking oil.i think it was an old blazer with a 6.2. the dude went to all the local restaurants in his small town, and relieved them of their frying oil couple times a month. the local kids all loved his truck causs it smelled like french fries whenever he went by. :D
     
  12. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    Yes it is true. You can run it on 100%, but most studies have shown that in lower temperture days, that it is a little rough on the lift pump and injection pump. The rotary IP is not as strong as the inline IP's found in MB diesels, and as such, cannot pump as viscious fuel. That is the reason for blending, it cuts viscosity of the oil so that it is more similiar to regular diesel. The ideal way is a two tank setup, one with diesel, one with vegetable, and to warm up the engine before you switch over to the veggie.

    Rancid- Vegetable oil is a funny thing. Much like diesel fuel, both can go rancid. Unused oil will be fine for a long period of time. Used oil can go rancid , depending on how much impurities are inside. The cleanr the oil , the better it is. French fry oil is some of the best. Be wary of places that emty their grease traps into it though, that has a lot of impurities. Same thing with diesel, keep the fuel dry, and free of water. I've kept fuel around for 8 months without a problem

    EPA rules and regulations: Certain states, acutally classify used vegetable oil (waste food oils) as Hazmats. your supposed to file for a license before you do this in those states, but they kinda look at you funny. THe bright side is, its totally organic. You dont worry about blowing your house up. Much like Diesel is relatively safe compared to gasoline, vegetable oil is very inert- it takes several hundred degrees of heat just to get it started. It doesnt vaporize either until then. (think grease fire- hard to start one unless you apply heat)

    How much do I pay per gallon- I dont pay. Work with your local restaurants, most are more than willing to give it to you. You pay with your time to collect and filter.

    Do I smell like mcdonalds- I personally dont smell like mcdonalds. The exhaust fumes smell like a deep fryer. This will be based on where youget your oil from. Whatever they were cookin in the oil, is what your exhaust will smell like.

    Average processing cost for WVO-about 10-20 cents a gallon.
    Average cost for bio diesel- about 70-80 cents a gallon.
     
  13. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    I have to say, the 6.2 is a very good engine for conversion. Other than the usual complaints about the 6.2, its relatively simple in design, free from computer control, and pretty durable when it comes to using less than regular fuel, as long as it is lubricating. I saw that the turtle expedition had outfitted their f350 with a Artic prepped DB2 pump, but I have never been able to find anything else about it anywhere else.

    This is my second 6.2 truck. one of the best diesel truck fuel economies still to this day, and one of the least complex.
     
  14. mini_mull

    mini_mull 1/2 ton status

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    That's amazing. You'll be driving on vegetable oil long after a bunch of us are pushed out of our big engined DD trucks by gas prices. Hmm, maybe I'll have to make sure my next truck is a diesel so I can drive it when gas for the burb gets too expensive for a DD. Heck at $.20-.80 a gallon you have 100-200 more dollars to spend every month on other parts for your truck instead of throwing it away on gasoline. Which diesel engines run the best on WVO or bio diesel? Does it run the same with a TD vs NA?
     
  15. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    I now have 4 chevy trucks:
    89 C1500 gas
    87 K5 gas
    83 Suburban diesel
    92 k2500 diesel

    I dont really drive my gas trucks anymore.. lol. The gas pickup is mint, and only has 87000 miles. The k5 only has 135k. Funny thing is, the k5 isnt even registered, too much money for gas.

    All the 6.5/6.2's run it without much issues. Keep in mind, the same FSD problems still apply. Do everything you would normally do to keep the engines happy, and they are ok. the ideal year is a 92-93 turbo diesel. Fully mechanical injection, yet the power of turbo. Very reliable. 94-96 were kinda blah, but can be fixed as well. 97 and up I have heard of cracking issues from the oil cooling passages. I've not read up too much on those, since they didnt really apply to me.

    Ideal diesel engines are indirect injection (Older 7.3/6.9's from ford; 6.2/6.5 GM, Older Cummins, MB diesels prior to 96 IIRC, most any VW diesel, and the rare but great, Toyota diesels (avaliable in older land cruisers).

    Good luck on finding one though! They are kinda hard to come by- especially as fuel prices keep increasing , history repeats itself. (remember why the 6.2 engine was created- to provide power between a 305 and a 350 with fuel economy as one of its most important qualities)- the EPA rates my diesel surb in 1983, with EGR, producing 23mpg on the highway. No synthetic fluids, no high tech motor oils back then.....
     

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