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sector shaft to aluminum cap..HOW TO ASSEMBLE ?!

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by ColAdo82K5, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. ColAdo82K5

    ColAdo82K5 1/2 ton status

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    Hey,
    I have a 2wd sector shaft and I am trying to install it.
    1. When threading the shaft into the top cap, how far do you thread it in ? I imagine you can go most of the way because the shaft only has to to spin like 90 degrees. How about threading it in all the way and then backing off 2 turns ?

    2. What is the torque of the nut on top of the sector shaft ?

    Thanks,
    Blake
     
  2. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    Well, it is more complicated than 2 turns. That is a good start. That threaded rod sets the gear back lash in the box. The nut just locks it in place so it won't change. Threaded all the way in and back off two turns then install it. Put the box together, then feel the back lash by hand. Here is how you do this.

    WITH THE ENGINE OFF and the steering from the axle not connected to the box. Grab the steering shaft (tube from firewall to steeringbox) and turn it abot a 1/4 turn to feel the play. If the box is on your bench install the rag joint and use it to check for play. Leave the jamb nut loose. Turn the sector shaft threaded rod in as you feel for the play in the gears (by twisting the steering shaft). If it makes a grinding sound it is too tight. If it take two hands it is way too tight. There should be almost no noticeable resistance when turning for play. There should also be no slop. It has slop if the steering shaft moves before the sector shaft does. This will get you about right. If you notice any wander in the steering you can fine tune it more with the wheels on the ground everything set up connected (engine running this time) and check the backlash again (at the steering shaft). Any play will show up real quick as you won't be able to move the tires so you shouldn't be able to move the steering shaft either (maybe and less than 1/8 turn due to the links/ends).

    Hope that helps. It sounds a lot harder than it is. I try to be as word friendly as I can (hence step by step & long winded). I have set up 2 boxes this way (my own and hossbaby50's -> both DD/trail rigs) and have no problems to mention even after a few thousand miles.
     
  3. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    The proper method would be using a beam type in.lb. torque wrench to set the preload.
     
  4. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    Ya, Ya, see my sig, it is close enough for me. /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif j/k.

    I don't have an inch/lb wrench so this is my backyard method. I would like to test is with a wrench to see just how close I got.
     
  5. ColAdo82K5

    ColAdo82K5 1/2 ton status

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    Thanks for the info...
    stiffness/grinding for being to tight and excessive slop for being too loose...
    Is this a "really exact" thing ? I can't imagine it being too picky. It is just meshing 3 gears.

    Blake
     
  6. ColAdo82K5

    ColAdo82K5 1/2 ton status

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    Tyler,
    Coming to the Fall Crawl ?
     
  7. az-k5

    az-k5 1/2 ton status

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    It is a bit more exact than you think. There is constant friction in there and a lot of movement over time. The closer you are at reassembly the longer it will last. Like I said it is doable (and pretty easy at that) just have some patience and take your time tuning it. This is just like some of the directions I have from old service manuals where "snug" is a torque rating. /forums/images/graemlins/pimp1.gif
     
  8. BlueBlazer

    BlueBlazer 1/2 ton status

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    Maybe. You still need a fender cause I have one for ya?
     
  9. ColAdo82K5

    ColAdo82K5 1/2 ton status

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    JUST for everyone's info...incase this comes up in a search:

    Matt Hodges of West Texas Offroad says:

    The adjuster stud and lock nut have to be adjusted tight enough that you don't have any slack in the steering wheel but loose enough that don't feel the steering bind in the center of the steering gears. It's an easy process for me to do but trying to explain it is a little hard.
    I don't even know where my book is that lists in/lbs ratings is anymore. I haven't used it in years. they aren't always right anyway and I have my own methods that work better.
    easiest way for me to tell you how to do it is to take the box off and tighten that adjuster stud a little at a time until while you turn the input shaft with a wrench from lock to lock. as it the adjuster stud goes in you will feel the steering get tight in the center of the steering arc or halfway between locks. you then want to back the adjuster stud off until you can't feel that tightness in the steering in the center. Then lock the nut down.
    hope this helps and not confuses.
     

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