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Shock compression vs. droop

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BamBamblazer, Apr 25, 2005.

  1. BamBamblazer

    BamBamblazer 1/2 ton status

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    For those of you who have set your own shock mounts, how did you divide the travel of your shocks? I just got to measureing on my shocks and mounts and found out i only have 4" of droop before i am fully extended on my shocks. I am seriosly looking at the 15" travel porc shocks but i will have to do something about the compression side. I have right at 25.5" shock mount to shock mount and those are 21.13 compressed. Or i can go with the 13" travel porc shocks that are 19.45 compressed. Those would give me 6" of compression and 7" of droop. Soooo the question is how much compression and droop do you have at your shocks??
     
  2. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    Couldn't tell if you have by your post, but the best thing to do is to cycle your suspension and then take measurements. Get some compressed and extended measesurements between your shock mounts and then compare those measurements to the available shocks. That will give you your best info on what shocks to get...

    On my old 86 k5, I had a 6" Superlift Superride lift and the Autozone G63438 shocks(12.5" travel)... In the stock mounts I would bottom them out..(needed to make a taller top mount).. Not sure on the fully extended though.
     
  3. BamBamblazer

    BamBamblazer 1/2 ton status

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    Was this on the front or rear? I am mainly looking at the rear right now, and i dont want to inboard them and loose stability. I feel that 6",s of compression should be fine but i just wanted more input.
     
  4. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    what he said, cycle the suspension and measure. Its the only way to know for sure.

    j
     
  5. ntsqd

    ntsqd 1/2 ton status

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    What Brett King (of King Racing Shocks) told me was to set the shocks at the midpoint of travel. He was thinking in terms of a desert racer and not crawler though. Not sure how it might differ.

    I start by setting the bumpstop so that the spring is still positive arched by about 1/2" when the bumps are compressed to 1/2 their original height. Then set the shock so that if you kill the bumpstop and go metal to metal that you can't bottom out the shock. (If you run cheap shocks then this might not apply) Keep in mind that the further outboard from the bumpstop that the shock is mounted, the more it will compress beyond where the bumpstop limits things in articulation.
     
  6. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    Yes I believed this to be true in the rear also. Ran the 86k5 for a while on regular Superlift shocks for a 6" lift. Then went to the Gab's.... I noticed a decrease in flexability and figured it was due t the longer travel shock in normal shock mounts. I had shocks bottoming out(completely closed) where the Superlifts would still be showing some shaft....

    Another way I could tell was when I'd put a tire up on somethign the shock would close completely and start shoving the truck over to the other side....

    I'd still measure.... I feel the rear you can get away with a little longer than you can in the front..
     

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