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Shop Floor - concrete costs?

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Fubeca, Jan 24, 2006.

  1. Fubeca

    Fubeca 1/2 ton status

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    I'm thinking about building a 28' x 30' detached garage to store an extra car and act as a shop.

    I called the concrete guys that did my house - they want $4,200 to pour the floor. It will be a monolithic slab (floating slab) so its about 4" thick throughout and then near the perimeter is tapers down into a footing about 12" thick. Does that sound right?

    What is the going price for finished concrete?
    What if I pour it myself - I've got a few buddies I could rope into a day of work?
    It might end up 10 x 10 before I can afford it :haha: .
     
  2. Redfrog

    Redfrog 1/2 ton status

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    I just had a 30X48 poured for $3960.00 that price included 33+ tons of fill
    fiberglass and wire,plastic under the concrete for vapor barrier, 30X24 was 4"
    and the other 30X24 was 6". there were 2, 16' long by 3' deep footers for the
    door openings. also the floor was sloped for the floor drains set
     
  3. spongeidys

    spongeidys 1/2 ton status

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    lemme ask my dad he owns a concrete buisness that pours floors and walls and foundations and stuff...he'll be able to give you an accurate estimate if i can get him to take the time...hes sleeping right now so ill have to get back to you on it
     
  4. mikey_d05

    mikey_d05 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Will work for truck parts. :D
     
  5. big83chevy4x4

    big83chevy4x4 3/4 ton status

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    2 years ago it cost us like $600 to do a 24x24 4" thick for the concrete, then i think $35 for a case of beer for my cousin to help finish it. and we thought that was expensive, lol.
     
  6. colbystephens

    colbystephens 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    i'd do it myself. that has my vote. :)
     
  7. Fubeca

    Fubeca 1/2 ton status

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    Good thing I kept those 10b innards :haha: .
     
  8. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    I redid a corner of my shop this past summer 15 x 30 or so. 4" thick. Cost to have it poured was right at $600. Coonies racing engines and I did the floating and finishing.
     
  9. muscle

    muscle 1/2 ton status

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    28 x 30 x 4" calc out to be 10.37 yds of mud. pthis is providing that your flatwork is perfect. I usuall err up 1/2 yd so I would probably order 11 yds.

    Here in az I would order 3000 PSI with fiberlock, hotwater, air entrained, and if the sun will be shining on it I would add 2% high-early accelerant. I would also tie in a #3 rebar matt at no more than 3' OC spacing. Is it a mono-pour or will you have a stemwall up first where the floor will be a "floating slab" ?

    Go to this site to see the differance.

    Anyways for the mix i stated above I am paying 102.50/ yd for the concrete. Figure another $250 for the steel matt which is optional (ive poured many of the same slabs with fibermesh and they have performed very well. ) Also try to pour on a non-expansive sub-grade such as cinders, crushed granite, etc that will compact well.

    For that pour I would figure at least 3 workers, and they will be very busy. Also do not forget some concrete blankets to cover for 4-5 days this time of year.
     
  10. muscle

    muscle 1/2 ton status

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    sorry i just read your whole post and i must have skipped over the part where you state it is a mono pour. Your local code will require you to make the footings a certain width and depth. Usually this depth is well below the frost line. some building depts will allow less if it is for a non-occupied out building. Here in AZ it doesnt matter and in my county the footing is 18" x 18".

    hope that helps
     
  11. Fubeca

    Fubeca 1/2 ton status

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    I'm pretty sure the footings need to be 12" x 16" here. I'm leaning toward subbing it out, I don't want to worry about getting all of the footings/steel right. I want this shop to stay together through the hot/cold cycles here.
     
  12. gmcman7202

    gmcman7202 1/2 ton status

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    One idea is to make a pit in the floor so ya can stand when u do repairs on the vehicles... that is if u dont have a lift.... anoter thing i say to do is to insulate the floor before u pour with the white sheets of foam.... keeps the concrete warmer..... another thing i say to do is install hydronic heat pipes, even if u dont use them right away... keeps the place alot warmer.... that is if its a shop, not jsut storage...

    with the pit, just make a recessed lip to hold 2x6's so the floor space isnt lost
     
  13. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Its costly...

    When I built my quonset garage in 1992,it cost me 1750 bucks for a crew to come dig out some dirt from the floor,grade and tamp it,and pour the concerete,including the cement..I imagine its at least double that now..the cement was 55 a yard then for "fibermesh",that alone cost about 800 bucks for the 13 yards it took to do the roughly 20x40 floor..and it all came in one truck too!..they had to skimp a bit near the edges,it was only 3" thick instead of 6" in the center..but I have nothing heavy around the perimiter anyway,just benches and tools,etc.

    My building has a concrete wall and footers like a house..building inspector here didn't like a "monolithic slab" for some reason..so I opted to go the conventional route..it was another 1800 for the footers and walls..they were 10x20" footings and the wall was 10" thick and 4' high,3' of it below grade roughly..

    A pit is nice,but they outlawed them here for the most part..to build one and do it so they would approve it now would be difficult,and you could buy a lift much cheaper than the excavation and concrete form work and cement would cost..I regret not buying at least a used lift back when I had the cash to do so..I'd settle for one of those huge steel ramps they use at car dealerships to show off new cars..they dont look too hard to build really!..

    I also regret not putting tubing for radiant heat in the floor too..but I was afraid I'd drill holes in it if I did install a lift,and that would suck!..I should have used insulation under the floor too,and my floor cracked in several places,due to frost heaves and settling..

    I should have used at least some scrap steel for reinforcement..fibermesh is strong stuff,no chunks have broken out where it cracked,cant even pry it loose!..but it needs steel too here,it gets enough frost here to bust up most any floor..again,I was afraid the rebar would be right where I'd have to drill the floor for a lift,so I took the contractors advice and just used fibermesh alone..:crazy:
     
  14. muscle

    muscle 1/2 ton status

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    The biggest and worst enemy to a building or its slab is water. If you do not have the grade sloping away from the building, water can puddle next to the building. It can undernime the footing causing settling and it can migrate into the subgrade under the slab. when this happens, depending on how expansive the subgrade material is, the dirt (subgrade) will expand like a sponge and cause hydraulic forces upward on the slab.
     
  15. Fubeca

    Fubeca 1/2 ton status

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    I have a fairly flat lot with a reasonable slope. We'll be building it up a few inches in the front and it will be several inches above grade in the rear. I don't expect to have trouble with water.

    I think pits are illegal here too. My next shop will have a lift. I'm limited to 10' sidewalls here by covenant.
     
  16. gmcman7202

    gmcman7202 1/2 ton status

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    i was not talking like a jiffylube pit, but just a pit about 5' tall and 4' wide, 10' long, how can that be illigeal if ya do the walls and reienforcement as stated in the code? oh and with the pipes, i believe there is a device that scans for the location of the pipes, they use it for pre stressed concrete pannels when they have to drill through the section...
     
  17. dontoe

    dontoe 3/4 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    I have a contractor coming by Saturday to pick up my blueprints and give me a quote on my pad. It's 25X40, has to have 16X18 footings with rebar and wire mesh over the entire pad. Give my quote soon!
     
  18. sled_dog

    sled_dog 1 ton status

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    They are flat out illegal in PA. To install anymore.

    Why question "how can it be illegal?" it is. Someone drives into it while you are in it, 4' wide is sitll wide enough to slam a car down on you.


    I'd pay to get it done and have a section reinforced(thicker pour, extra rebar) if you see any plans for a lift. I know a guy who just paid $7k for a pour on his pole barn, he went all out on it though.

    Relativety, whats cheap here could be insane where you are.
     
  19. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    its the pits...

    They outlawed all pits here,excepting only a very few that are "grandfathered" in a few older service stations,and private garages..the "Jiffy Lube" places have them though,but they have to be "open" on 3 sides,to allow easy escape if something goes wrong..

    The main reason they are banned is fire danger..I guess a few mechanics got fried when a droplight ignited a leaky gas tank or line..exhaust fumes could build up in a pit too--how the "quickie lube" places get around the laws is a mystery to me...I suppose they figure the boobs working there would drop cars off a regular lift too easily,and they figured driving the car over wide ramps is safer??..they must pay off the local officials to get the laws relaxed on them..they said "NO WAY" when I asked about a pit..guess my pockets wern't deep enough..:confused:

    My floor has at least 6" of compacted 3/4" crushed stone under it--the reason it cracked in my opinion is the high clay content in the soil here,and it expands a lot when it gets wet...they flodded the entire floor with water when the concrete truck delivered the stone,and it took a whole day for it to seep down into the soil under the stones..then they tamped it with a "whacker",and poured the cement..this was done in late november too,a 50 degree day..--
    --it dropped to below 32 a few days later..about 10 days went by,and I saw the first crack..more followed shortly thereafter..but I'm not concerned too much,the floor is very strong..I would not hesitate to bolt a lift to it..the cracks are more a cosmetic flaw than structural..ALL cement cracks here,not much you can do about it,even under ideal conditions..

    The land slopes away from my garage on one side,the other has a "swale" that collects rainwater and guides it about 5' away from the other side..I've never had "ground water" in the shop,only what water drips off the steel arches due to condensation when snow is on the roof,or during wide temparature swings..

    I had them make the floor slightly higher in the center than the ends,so if I wash my truck in there it will run out either end..I didn't put a floor drain in,and I'm glad I didn't..to do it to code at the time would have cost 5 grand,had to have a tank to catch the runoff,etc..then a few years later they say NO drains are allowed,and old ones need to be plugged!:screwy:

    Another waste is a hot air oil fired furnace I put in..to legally use it,I can only install no smaller than a 250 gallon tank outside the building,and it must have a concrete pit under it double the capacity of the tank,and a shed roof over it to keep rainwater out!..that costs 2500 bucks easy!..I'll stick to the wood stoves,and I might just rip out the furnace and scrap it,seeing I can't afford diesel to burn in it,and its not working right anyway..takes up a lot of room!:mad:
     
  20. afroman006

    afroman006 1/2 ton status

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    Muscle, it sounds like you are the hank hill of concrete. Not to hijack but this is concrete related. Is it possible to get a concrete floor that was poured with a rough surface smoothed out for a reasonable amount of money? My girlfriends parents just poured concrete in 90% of their 6000 sq. ft. barn and they opted for a rough surface to prevent slipping. Our ultimate plan is to buy the house and barn from them and build her a real horse barn, and for me to take over the shop. I would much prefer a smooth floor for automotive stuff, but only if its not crazy expensive.
     

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