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sipping,groving question

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by sapper, Dec 9, 2001.

  1. sapper

    sapper 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    what do these do for a tire? whats the difference in the two? do people use a branding iron type tool to do it? thanks just read about it and totally clueless on the subject.

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  2. tRustyK5

    tRustyK5 Big meanie Staff Member Super Moderator GMOTM Winner Author

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    Some people may define siping and grooving differently but our club defines siping as just small cuts in the tire that are reasonably shallow, and don't remove any rubber from the tire. Grooving is removing some material...(like dividing a large lug like Stephen Watson did to his 42's)

    What siping supposedly does is give the tire some more 'biting' edges like an AT in the snow. One of our club members did this to his BFG MT's. He used a utility knife to cut several small slits across each lug about 1/8" deep. Very time consuming, but he claims he does much better in the snow now. One problem with siping is if your cuts are too deep or too close to the edge of a lug you can get chunking when on the rocks and stuff.

    Rene

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  3. taterblazer

    taterblazer 1/2 ton status

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    Like Rene said it increases traction while decreasing tire life due to wear. If you want to cipe your tires and I know a lot of people that do just have your local tire shop do it. They throw it on a machine and it does all the cutting.
     
  4. RedDwarf

    RedDwarf 1/2 ton status

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    That's "siping" [​IMG]

    Actually, siping can actually make your tires last longer
    It allows your tread to flex easier, so it reduces heat in the tread, and heat is what causes the tread to wear down.
    It also reduces spinning, especially on rocks and wet surfaces, so it helps wear that way too. If you remember to not cut too deep, siping will be a great benefit to your tires.
     
  5. taterblazer

    taterblazer 1/2 ton status

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  6. jcg

    jcg 1/2 ton status

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    I cut my BFG MT's in the middle of last winter and it made a HUGE difference. The truck handled so much better on wet and icy roads, it was like a totally different vehicle. It improved traction on the rocks considerably too. I just stepped up to 36" TSL's for my trail tires and I'm debating cutting them too. So far they've been great so I don't think I'll need to spend the 6 hours in front of the tv with a utility knife that I did with the MT's. On my MT's I only cut the center lugs like everyone else said cause the outside ones could come apart on the rocks. I did use a linolium cutter to groove the outer lugs about a 1/16" deep down the center for the length of the lug and I never had any problems with the lugs coming apart.

    Joe
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