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Skid Marks #28

Discussion in 'Land Use' started by mudfanatic, Dec 1, 2000.

  1. mudfanatic

    mudfanatic 1/2 ton status

    Joined:
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    Location:
    Aloha, Oregon
    Even Eco-Terrorists have a sense of humor:
    (quoting from below)
    in the spirit of the holidays . . .
    WHY DIDN'T THE TURKEY CROSS THE ROAD?
    BECAUSE IT WAS HIDING BEHIND A BUSH TO AVOID BEING GORED BY AN ATV

    -----Original Message-----
    From: Jacob Smith [mailto:prebles@indra.com]
    Sent: Monday, November 27, 2000 2:27 PM
    To: skid marks - posting
    Subject: Skid Marks #28


    SKID MARKS
    ISSUE #28 November 27, 2000

    Skid Marks, Wildlands Center for Preventing Roads' (usually) biweekly e-mail
    newsletter, reports on activist efforts to challenge roads and motorized
    recreation nationwide. Skid Marks shares instructive and precedent-setting
    successes and failures in the campaign to halt motorized abuse of wildland
    ecosystems.

    ---

    CONTENTS:

    1. FINAL ROADLESS INITIATIVE ANNOUNCED

    2. YELLOWSTONE TO PHASE OUT SNOWMOBILES

    3. COURT DISMISSES LEGAL CHALLENGE OF HIGHWAY PROJECT

    4. NEW CRITICAL HABITAT FOR FISH DELAYS TOLL ROAD

    5. MONTANA CONSERVATIONISTS SUE OVER ORV MANAGEMENT

    6. NPS SCENIC RIVER SYSTEM PERSONAL WATERCRAFT BAN UPHELD

    7. SNOWMOBILES POSE SERIOUS HAZARD TO CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

    ---

    FINAL ROADLESS INITIATIVE ANNOUNCED

    The Clinton Administration released its long-awaited Roadless Initiative
    last week, calling for the protection of nearly 60 million acres of National
    Forest lands from commercial logging and road building. Although a final
    Record of Decision is not expected until December, environmentalists largely
    applauded the action. "More Americans have participated in this rule-making
    process than in any other federal rule-making ever," said Ken Rait of the
    Heritage Forest Campaign. "Almost two million official public comments have
    been counted by the Forest Service in the last year, with more than 95%
    supporting the strongest possible protection for our wild forests."

    Some in the conservation community were more measured in their response.
    "Because of the policy's exceptions, 25% of planned road construction and
    reconstruction will still occur in roadless areas," commented Marnie Criley,
    Wildlands CPR's Roads Policy Coordinator. "This is a 75% reduction but not
    an elimination of road construction and reconstruction in Inventoried
    Roadless Areas." Additionally, the proposal does not address off-road
    vehicle use. Criley also notes, "Not only does the roadless initiative
    allow motorized use to continue in roadless areas, but new motorized routes
    can also be authorized and built into roadless areas under the proposed
    plan." Critics also point to the considerable latitude in the plan's
    exception for "stewardship logging" activities and the delayed inclusion of
    the Tongass National Forest (which will not be covered by the initiative
    until 2004)

    ---

    YELLOWSTONE TO PHASE OUT SNOWMOBILES

    The National Park Service announced last Wednesday its intention to phase
    out most snowmobile use in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks over a
    three year period. The Park Service will instead rely on
    concessionaire-operated multi-passenger snowcoaches. The decision follows
    years of lawsuits, agency research on appropriate winter recreation in the
    Parks, and public involvement. Some in the conservation community were
    enthusiastic about the decision. "The Park Service rightfully said this
    deterioration must stop," said Kevin Collins of the National Parks
    Conservation Association. "Yellowstone must be restored and passed on to
    future generations unharmed." However, some in the conservation community
    contend that the Park Service's plan fails to protect critical environmental
    qualities. D.J. Schubert, a biologist representing Fund for Animals,
    commented, "While this plan is a good first step, it fails to address the
    enormous environmental impact of road grooming on wildlife, especially to
    bison."

    ---

    COURT DISMISSES LEGAL CHALLENGE OF HIGHWAY RIDER

    A Federal District Court ruled against Pennsylvania environmentalists and
    sport groups last month in their effort to halt a highway construction
    project through sensitive habitat, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported on
    November 17. The challenge focused on a 66-word passage buried in the 1998
    federal transportation bill exempting an Interstate 99 construction project
    from federal environmental law. The passage was authored by Representative
    Bud Shuster, a Pennsylvania Republican who chairs the House Transportation
    and Infrastructure Committee. The relevant section reads: "notwithstanding
    any other provision of law ... the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania is
    authorized to proceed with engineering, final design and construction of
    [I-99]" on Bald Eagle Mountain.

    Critics argue that the eight-mile highway addition will damage important
    wildlife habitat, 500 spring seeps, and 66 streams. The District Court
    disagreed with their claim that the language was excessively vague. The
    issue is currently under appeal in the U.S. 3rd Circuit Court of Appeals.

    ---

    NEW CRITICAL HABITAT FOR FISH DELAYS TOLL ROAD

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service designated nine miles of a creek as
    critical habitat for the tidewater goby, a small, imperiled tidewater fish
    found only in California, reports the November 15 L.A. Times. The
    designation is likely to block development of the Foothill South
    Transportation Corridor, a controversial 16-mile toll road connecting the
    undeveloped area east of Mission Viejo to Interstate 5. The Service is
    concerned that the proposed toll road route may eliminate shelter as well as
    feeding and breeding grounds in San Mateo and San Onofre creeks for the
    tidewater goby in addition to a host of other protected species, including
    the California gnatcatcher, southwestern arroyo toad, Riverside fairy
    shrimp, one of the last three known populations of the Pacific pocket mouse,
    and the only known population of steelhead trout south of Malibu Creek.

    ---

    MONTANA CONSERVATIONISTS SUE OVER ORV MANAGEMENT

    Montana conservationists went to court last week to challenge the Forest
    Service's failure to properly manage ORVs. The coalition, led by the
    Montana Wilderness Association, charges that the agency is failing to
    enforce its own rules on the Bitterroot and Clearwater National Forests.
    The rules in question prohibit the use of motorized vehicles wider than 40"
    on forest trails. The coalition contends that this use is adversely
    affecting natural resources and the wild qualities of proposed wilderness
    areas, including the Great Burn proposed wilderness. The Montana Wilderness
    Association was joined in the lawsuit by the Great Burn Study Group and
    Predator Conservation Alliance.

    ---

    NPS SCENIC RIVER SYSTEM PERSONAL WATERCRAFT BAN UPHELD

    The National Park Service will uphold a nationwide ban on personal
    watercraft along 98 miles of the Missouri River in Nebraska and South
    Dakota. Eighty-two percent of the more than 10,000 people who sent cards,
    letters, and e-mails favored keeping the Missouri River ban, according to a
    report issued by the Park Service. The ban, applying to waters designated
    under the National Wild and Scenic River system, stands to protect 39 miles
    from Fort Randall Dam to Chief Standing Bear Bridge near Niobrara, Nebraska
    and 59 miles from Gavins Point Dam near Yankton, South Dakota, to Ponca
    State Park along the Missouri River. The Park Service pointed to safety
    concerns and environmental impacts, especially to nesting sites for bald
    eagle, least tern, and piping plover, as reasons for the decision.

    ---

    SNOWMOBILES POSE SERIOUS HAZARD TO CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULTS

    A new study concludes that snowmobiles pose a significant risk to children
    younger than 15 years and adolescents and young adults ages 15 through 24.
    The study, published in the November issue of the Journal of Pediatrics,
    found that head injuries, generally resulting from snowmobilers colliding,
    falling, or overturning their machines, are the leading cause of mortality
    and serious injury among youth in this age bracket. The study recommends
    that states adopt a graduated licensing program for those older than 16 and
    prohibit the operation of snowmobiles by anyone below that age.

    ---

    and, in the spirit of the holidays . . .


    WHY DIDN'T THE TURKEY CROSS THE ROAD?

    BECAUSE IT WAS HIDING BEHIND A BUSH TO AVOID BEING GORED BY AN ATV


    *********************************************

    Please keep in touch with us about your roads and motorized recreation work.
    Questions about Skid Marks should be directed to Jacob Smith at
    prebles@indra.com. Please send e-mail action alerts to
    WildlandsCPR@wildrockies.org.

    TO SUBSCRIBE
    If you aren't already subscribed to Skid Marks and you would like to be,
    send an email to majordomo@indra.com with the following command in the body
    of your email message:

    subscribe skidmarks [your email address]

    TO UNSUBSCRIBE
    Likewise, if you would like to remove yourself from our listserve, send an
    email to majordomo@indra.com with the following command in the body of your
    email message:

    unsubscribe skidmarks [your email address]

    Skid Marks is brought to you by the friendly road-rippers at Wildlands CPR.
    Thanks for your support and all of your efforts on behalf of wild places and
    imperiled species.

    *********************************************

    Jacob Smith, ORV Policy Coordinator
    Wildlands Center for Preventing Roads (Colorado office)
    P.O. Box 2353
    Boulder, Colorado 80306-2353
    (303) 247-0998
    prebles@indra.com

    Marnie Criley, Roads Policy Coordinator
    Wildlands Center for Preventing Roads (main office)
    PO Box 7516
    Missoula, MT 59807
    406/543-9551
    WildlandsCPR@wildrockies.org
    http://www.wildrockies.org/WildCPR/

    <font color=red>get involved with land issues or lose the land</font color=red>
     

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