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skid plates

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by TXsizeK5, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. TXsizeK5

    TXsizeK5 1/2 ton status

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    I was thinking of designing a skid plate for my low xfer case... I had a design in mind but I wnated to see how everyone elses were, can you post pics or describe em?
     
  2. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    I raised my drivetrain up so that my t cases are above the bottom of the frame.I have a sheet of 1/2" aluminum that Im gonna make a big flat skid plate from.Its gonna go from the front spring shackles to the rear spring hangers

    I dont have the skid on yet but you can see how high I got everything.

    [​IMG]
     
  3. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    I made this one for the 208 I had.I made it from 3/8" and 1/4" steel with a 1"x2" solid bar brace on the bottom

    [​IMG]
     
  4. TXsizeK5

    TXsizeK5 1/2 ton status

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    See, my xfer case hangs down below the frame rails pretty low like yours in the 2nd pic...and I've been asking constantly if it would be same effect if i put it back to stock and ran a longer double cardon shaft, but no one has answered me yet. The only thing is, my exhuast is like RIGHT OVER my xfercase so I'd have to get that re-done... /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif
     
  5. jekbrown

    jekbrown I am CK5 Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    a sheet of 0.5" AL that big? holy chit, how much did that cost?! I think i smell a "work freebie"...

    j
     
  6. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    [ QUOTE ]
    a sheet of 0.5" AL that big? holy chit, how much did that cost?! I think i smell a "work freebie"...

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I've always thought that'd be a sweet project. Make one big enough to keep crap off the motor. Hardest part would be the clearancing for the driveshaft.

    I'd make it multiple pieces and weld nuts in the frame so it could be easily removed with one socket and ratchet.
     
  7. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    hardest part would be cleaning the junk out!!! Unless you made it easily removable as mentioned above.
     
  8. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    I did all that when I installed my doubler so I needed exhaust work,drivelines,and a new cross member anyway.Another thing that helped with gettin it up in there is that my 205 is rotated up 2" to be even with the bottom of the 203.The raising everything up 3" was a no $$ mod,the best kind /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    How much is your t case dropped down? Ya might be able to get away with raising it with only having to move your exhaust and no driveline mods if its not dropped down to far.It kinda one of those deals that ya wont know til ya get into it.
     
  9. TXsizeK5

    TXsizeK5 1/2 ton status

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    I'm planning to get new shafts anyway and to get a smaller lift. I have a 6" right now... heres a pic of the tcase you can see the xfer case and the crossmember hanging down, its definately 1" or maybe more of a drop... http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/dc4x4/pic99.html
     
  10. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    I didnt get it from work but I did get it for free.I cant remember how much it was per pound but it would have been over $400 /forums/images/graemlins/shocked.gif
     
  11. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    The easiest way to clean it out is to not do mud in the first place /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  12. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    Got Mud? I love to hit a mudhole once in a while.
     
  13. TXsizeK5

    TXsizeK5 1/2 ton status

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    I'm not trying to clean anything, and believe me, mud is in the PAST /forums/images/graemlins/eek.gif
     
  14. KrebsATM02

    KrebsATM02 1/2 ton status

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    Aluminum is sweet because it is light and doesn't rust, but doesn't work well for skid plates. It's friction co-efficient is too high. By that I mean when your truck is dragging it's belly across rocks it will "stick" rather than slide.

    I'd use 3/16 steel, while it weigh's more, weight isn't bad when it's that low to the ground. Believe me, I hate adding weight to our heavy trucks, but this isn't the place to use aluminum.

    I've seen this first hand too. I guy in our club has a sweet Nissan Patrol (the only thing Patrol is the body). He built a custom frame and used an all toyota drivetrain on it. His whole floor is aluminum so he wanted to continue this look for the sliders. Well the second run out he got into a fight with some rocks and it pretty much peeled the aluminum back.

    1/2 probably wouldn't peel like his did, but it sure would stick.
     
  15. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    Not all aluminum is "sticky"

    Even so,I would rather have a rock stuck to my skid plate than stuck to my t cases or tranny /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif
     
  16. KrebsATM02

    KrebsATM02 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    Not all aluminum is "sticky"

    Even so,I would rather have a rock stuck to my skid plate than stuck to my t cases or tranny /forums/images/graemlins/tongue.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    See there you go making fun of my technical terms. I'll have you know that I got that out of an engineering text book! /forums/images/graemlins/rotfl.gif

    Anyways, I'm assuming a non "sticky" aluminum would be harder? And also more expensive? School me on aluminum!
     
  17. atlantak-5er

    atlantak-5er 1/2 ton status

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    Sort of off topic but--Does anyone make a bolt on skid plate for a 203? Or will a stock one from a 208 or 241 work?
     
  18. outlaw612

    outlaw612 1/2 ton status

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    How about some details on what was involved in raising the driveline 3"? Please! /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  19. wrathORC

    wrathORC 1/2 ton status

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    I agree on the not working for skidplates. Our sandrail has aluminum plate skidplates and it sticks pretty good. The surface just digs into the aluminum and holds on.

    On the other hand, I have a piece of T651-6061 aluminum that I used to have under my quad. That stuff is slick. It's even better than the plastic stuff I ran when I used to race it. It's also on the brittle side. And expensive.

    There is also T6-7075 and T351-2024 but I doubt they're any cheaper.

    But considering at the end of the day that annealed 1040 steel is just about as strong as the T651-6061 you might as well save the money and use the one that rusts instead of corrodes.

    Plus, steel doesn't fatigue like aluminum does. And steel doesn't complain as much about being work hardened (dents) as aluminum.


    PS: this is an electrical engineer trying to be a materials engineer.
     
  20. FRIZZLEFRY

    FRIZZLEFRY 1/2 ton status

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    I aint makin fun,thats realy the best way to discribe it /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif

    Im not qualified to school anyone but there are a few different grades of aluminum.Aluminum combines a unique set of properties (lightweight and resistant to corrosion). It is also nontoxic which makes it an excellent material in cooking utensils.
    Most aluminum types are an alloy of aluminum, which includes a small quantity of silicon, iron, copper, magnesium, or nickel. These alloys differ in hardness, tensile strength, and other properties.
    Non-Heat Treatable (Common) Alloys

    1100-0 - Commercially pure aluminum. Excellent corrosion resistance, workability and weldability; high thermal conductivity. Uses include deep drawing, spinning, sheet metal work, decorative applications, air ducts, etc.

    3003-0-H14 - The most widely used general purpose alloy. 3003 is stronger than 1100 but still readily formable. Excellent resistance to chemicals and weathering.

    5005-H32 or H34 - Excellent workability, weldability, and corrosion resistance. 5005 is typically specified for applications where anodizing is required. Anodized coating is clear and lighter than 3003.

    5052-H34 - A versatile alloy for applications requiring greater strength. Readily formed, very good corrosion resistance in marine applications.

    Heat Treatable (Strong) Alloys

    6061-T4 or T6 - High strength allow provides good formability, weldability, and corrosion resistance. May be difficult to perforate or bend.

    6063-T6 - Highly corrosion resistant with good formability. Softer than 6061-T6 and easier to bend. Finish is pleasing and is the most suitable for anodizing.

    Hows that for copy and paste education /forums/images/graemlins/grin.gif
     

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