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Slip Yoke vs. Fixed Yoke

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by txfireman110, Jun 14, 2004.

  1. txfireman110

    txfireman110 1/2 ton status

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    Which is better, and why? /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif

    I want to get mine right before I spend the money on driveshafts!! /forums/images/graemlins/pimp1.gif /forums/images/graemlins/yikes.gif


    Also, can I convert my slip yoke to fixed,..what parts would I need and what to get them off of?
    Thanks!
     
  2. pauly383

    pauly383 Daddy383 Staff Member Moderator

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    The fixed yoke is actually stronger. It is also shorter so your driveshafts can be longer, which is better on angles. You will also be able to remove the driveline without losing your lube and drive home in front drive. Now that said, I still run a slip yoke. /forums/images/graemlins/k5.gif
     
  3. mudhog

    mudhog THEGAME Staff Member Super Moderator

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    fixed yoke is best. it is nice to be able to remove the driveline and still drive home and not have to worry about loosing the fluid /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  4. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    I'm assuming that you are refering to an NP205.
    [ QUOTE ]
    Also, can I convert my slip yoke to fixed,..what parts would I need and what to get them off of?
    Thanks

    [/ QUOTE ]
    To convert mine I got a 205 from a 78 F250 and swapped out the front and rear outputs.
    I had to also use the rear output bearing housing from the
    GM 205. The Ford ones are clocked different and the oil feed and return holes will be wrong. Resulting in a burned up rear output bearing.

    A GM fixed yoke assy is a bolt on affair, there are needle bearings that are sorta a pain, but grease and needle nose make short work of that
    I used the Ford case for parts because I wanted the 32 spline front output as well. 1330 front and rear outputs.
    Later on I would like to go to 1410's.
    While I was kickin around inside it I also ground the shift rail for twin stick operation.
    I cleaned it all up and brought it inside and did this on my coffee table.
    Swapping outputs can be done with the t-case still in the rig though.
    I used the drive shafts from the donor rig to tie it to the axles. $145 to have the rear shortened and balanced with new u-joints. $75 to have the front shortened and new joints.
    The case and drivelines were given to me so it wasn't to spendy for me. And since I was in dire need of new shafts anyway it all sorta worked out in my favor.
     
  5. blazerpunk

    blazerpunk 1/2 ton status

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    Is it possable to swap a fixed yoke from a 203 onto a 205. /forums/images/graemlins/thinking.gif
     
  6. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    No it won't.
    Your best bet is to get ahold of either a Dodge or GM fixed yoke 205 and swap out the rear section.
    It's a pretty easy job and doesn't take long to do.
     
  7. 6.2Blazer

    6.2Blazer 1/2 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    fixed yoke is best. it is nice to be able to remove the driveline and still drive home and not have to worry about loosing the fluid /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif

    [/ QUOTE ]

    True, but it's a lot cheaper to carry a $20 spare driveshaft and you can still keep wheelin' if the rear shaft let's go. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  8. POWERMAD

    POWERMAD 1/2 ton status

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    True but your chances of doing that will be less with a fixed yoke.
    After it was all bolted up I noticed that the t-case pinion angle was alot better than what it was. Even with the case dropped 2" I went through alot of u-joints and wound up welding the caps to the yoke to keep the last set in place.
    Ran it that way for about a year.
    Anyways for the breif time it was rolling under it's own power again I noticed all my drivetrain vibrations were gone.
    Not like the last shaft was part of the problem or anything LOL
    But after I installed the 14 bolt it had crappy angles, I dropped the case after going over a bump at 60 caused the yokes to bind..... That sound makes yer butt clench.

    Now at 80 or so it ran smooth other than the lumpy tires and running on 7.5 cylinders.
    ..
    Here's a handy tip o the day
    If you do happen to have a slip yoke and you lose the shaft and don't happen to be carrying a spare at the moment get the duct tape (you do have duct tape?)
    Using a small soda or water bottle cut it in half.
    Tear off strips of tape and half them and wrap the tail untill it is about the ID of the bottle.
    Put a few wraps around the bottle and put it over the tail.
    Seal it down with a hose clamp.
    Top off case if needed and head for the barn.
     

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