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snow rigs?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by PeteH, Feb 2, 2004.

  1. PeteH

    PeteH 1/2 ton status

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    just wondering what type of setup is good for snow wheelin or at least just driving around in icy /forums/images/graemlins/woot.gif snowy conditions. lockers? wheel size? things i should carry with me?winch etc.?? my truck is pretty much stock so i wanna do something because i moving to wyoming.i know i'll need new tires, and maybe chains. /forums/images/graemlins/1zhelp.gif
     
  2. 84_Chevy_K10

    84_Chevy_K10 Banned

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    Skinny tires...four of them.
     
  3. RustBuket

    RustBuket 1/2 ton status

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    Keeping your tires at a slightly lower than normal air pressure helps I find. Not too low though. Also, keep shovels with you at all times. I've used mine for myself a few times and for others even more. I wish I had bought a tow strap so that may be a good investment. The most important thing would probably be an emergency quit with something to light a fire, maybe a skidoo suit, a blanket, matches, and all that jazz. Another important thing is to make sure you have enough antifreeze in your engine or else you'll end up cracking the block if it gets really cold. I got darn close, I froze up the heater core but luckily I had a feeling it would be super cold that night so I plugged it in and it stayed warmer (it went to -50 celcius that night). /forums/images/graemlins/ooo.gif
     
  4. Z3PR

    Z3PR Banned

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    An Artic Snowcat would be my first choice. But then reality slaps me in the face. Serously, some stock size (studded ??) snow tires would be good for snow and ice. /forums/images/graemlins/deal.gif
     
  5. bryguy00b

    bryguy00b 3/4 ton status

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    yea, what tim said, skinny tires, my dads got skinnys on his truck and it cuts through the snow much better than my 12.50's...they tend to float more, specialy with no wieght in the back /forums/images/graemlins/deal.gif
     
  6. PeteH

    PeteH 1/2 ton status

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    are there any advantages or disadvantages with either the drum or disk brakes in the snow? and what bout lockers in the front and rear?... i kinda want to got to the 14bff in the rear witht the detroit but should i get a cheap locker in the front?
     
  7. RustBuket

    RustBuket 1/2 ton status

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    If you're going to get a locker in the front that would be cool but either get a selectable one or don't engage 4x4 while on the ice in the streets. You would have excellent traction that is until you break loose and your vehicle has no lateral control and you go sliding off the road. It would make turns difficult too as the front tires would want to push.
     
  8. 81jimmyslt

    81jimmyslt 1/2 ton status

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    My tires I drive in the snow all the time, I love em...Four wheel drive is your best friend...if I get stuck just pop it in 4lo and be off. Don't go too wide like they said but you still want a good foot print.

    As with the lockers get an electric locker or arb for daily snowy driving, otherwise you will be all over the place.

    You need new tires and wheels?
    [​IMG]

    check my thread in the for sale section.

    Oh ya definately get a tow strap if you don't have one...so you can help the not so bright ones out /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  9. 99firehawk

    99firehawk 1/2 ton status

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    So far my truck has been unstoppable in the snow. Its a 83 k5 with 6inchs of lift and 35x12.5 bfg ats (I feel they are the best snow tires I have ever used), IF the truck hadnt come with 6 inchs of lift I wouldnt have added it, I would have kept it to about 4 and ran 33x12.50s. I dont really off road my truck, It is a daily driver and winter driver. I have a open diff in the front and a (I know it sucks) gov lock in the back. I have been in snow over the axles and gone right through with little effort.
     
  10. CyberSniper

    CyberSniper 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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  11. fly_n_hi_yukon

    fly_n_hi_yukon Registered Member

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    Michelin Artic Alpins are also really good snow tires. We used to sell TONS of them at the one shop I worked at. Not sure if they make them in truck sizes though.
     
  12. bigyellowjimmy

    bigyellowjimmy 1/2 ton status

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    I moved from Torrington, WY 3 yrs ago. Its a great state, I think you'll like it. NO state sales tax! For highway speed driving in the ice an open rear end is best, you can get by locked in the rear if you are VERY careful at high speeds. Lower air pressure, weight over the drive axle and chains are helpful. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  13. rcurrier44

    rcurrier44 1/2 ton status

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    Snow wheeling and driving on icey roads require 2 different tires. On my DD I use a tall skiny studed mud tire (about 34" tall and 9" wide). Syping tires makes a big difference on any tire used in slick conditions.

    But when you get into realy snow wheeling you want as much floatation as possible. The biggest widest tires you can find, aired down to the 2 psi range. It is amazing whare a truck can go with lockers and low tire pressure. I run 44" TSLs at 1psi rear and 2 psi front. /forums/images/graemlins/waytogo.gif
     
  14. bigyellowjimmy

    bigyellowjimmy 1/2 ton status

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    Exactly, for highway driving on icy-windy Wyoming roads, open diffs and weight over the drive axle is a must. For offroad snow wheeling a wide tire to keep ya on top of the drifts are best. Have tire chains, strap, shovel, matches and blanket with you all winter. /forums/images/graemlins/peace.gif
     
  15. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    If you run wide tires stay away from any off camber situation because they will float on top of the snow and slide until something like a tree stops you.

    For normal snow driving wider is NOT better. The object when driving in snow when you break traction is to move snow until the tires touch ground and get traction...the wider the tire the more snow to move. On our 4x4 plow truck we just run generic range D LT tires. Small deep tread with lots of siping. Those things stick. Most of the time I don't even spin a tire although that could be from the truck weighing 7,000+ pounds.

    Also in my travels I have found that ABS and these fancy new AWD vehicles suck the nut. My inlaws expedition is about worthless in this crap (it dropped about 11 inches of white stuff today). Give me a 70s true 4x4 with skinnies and I'll take it damn near anywhere in the snow.
     
  16. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    [ QUOTE ]


    For normal snow driving wider is NOT better. The object when driving in snow when you break traction is to move snow until the tires touch ground and get traction...the wider the tire the more snow to move. On our 4x4 plow truck we just run generic range D LT tires. Small deep tread with lots of siping. Those things stick. Most of the time I don't even spin a tire although that could be from the truck weighing 7,000+ pounds.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    I would agree with you until the snow is deeper than your frame is from the ground. Dig down until your undercarriage sits on the snow and you are done. I'd rather have wide tires and apply the skinny pedal slowly or rock it until you can get some momentum then keep that momentum going.
     
  17. gravdigr

    gravdigr 1/2 ton status

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    True, but if the snow is that deep it is not normal snow driving. I've taken our plow truck (without the plow) through snow above the running boards without getting stuck (24"). If you really have a burning need to go through snow deeper than that then yes wider tires will help you float on top of the snow much like they do with sand.
     
  18. cybrfire

    cybrfire 1 ton status Vendor GMOTM Winner

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    That is exactly why I will always use a wider tire. You never know how deep its gona be. Might end up in deep mud or shallow who knows. Maybe will be in the sand and maybe not. All things being equal I would just as soon take my trail rig with wide tires. Now if we are talking a street rig only. Put the skinnies on and increase your contact patch pressure. Better for ice and whatever. If you find your self wondering where you will end up next put on the wide ones. /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  19. CyberSniper

    CyberSniper 1/2 ton status Premium Member

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    Before the snow got too deep I drove through my back yard. It was only about 24" deep for most of it but I was still plowing it with my grill and it was ending up on my hood. Lockers and skinny snow tires = snow fording.

    Skinny tires rule in the snow. Skinny snow tires in the snow are by far superior.

    Now, if I owned a 2500lb Jeep then I'd put some 35x15.50s with 15x12 wheels and 5psi and go floating in the woods. 33x12.50s in my "light" truck don't float for [darn] so whoever is thinking that has been smoking some good crack. I've tried. It floats good until you turn, stack up the snow, and dig yourself a hole.

    The first time someone on wide mud tires hits some slush and gets sucked into the snowbank they'll appreciate skinny tires.


    Today, I parked in the "exclusive" parking on campus as per usual. "Exclusive" parking being the snow bank. /forums/images/graemlins/histerical.gif I got stuck, hung up on the frame with no tires touching the ground. It wasn't one of my shining moments. I dug out under the front tires and the frame behind the front tires. I then dug out in front of the rear tires. I tossed some calcium chloride under the front tires. I got the truck to rock back and forth enough where the front tires hit the ground and it pulled itself out. Big mud tires would've just made it more difficult to get it out.
     
  20. BowtieRed

    BowtieRed 1/2 ton status Author

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    i flexed my explorer out on a snow bank at school. i mean ALL THE WAY as per left rear tire not touching until i put it in park and let off the brake.
     

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