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Soldering...

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by ryoken, Oct 18, 2006.

  1. ryoken

    ryoken Puppy Fabricator Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    Hey guys.... :D

    I've always been a decent backyard solderer and understand the principals, but have certainly had some not prettys, or redo's.....

    I have a large soldering project coming up and wanted to get a thread going on soldering techniques, tools, solders, etc...

    So post up with your experiences, tips and knowledge on the subject... Tools you like, what solders you use where, etc....
     
  2. wraenking

    wraenking 1/2 ton status

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    i always remeber that you need to tin the tip before you start.

    so 1st tip


    tin the tip (sounds gay lol)
     
  3. 86k5vortec

    86k5vortec Registered Member

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    -both parts you're soldering together should be clean and grease-free. if they are not, you can clean them with sanding paper, file or steel wool.
    -tin both parts to see if the solder really clings to the parts, it should not make round balls of tin!
    -don't use lead free tin while you still can.
    -use a moist sponge (the old fashioned kind, not the new style green/yellow ones) to clean the tip now and then.
    -better use too much heat than not enough heat.
    -try to mechanically lock the 2 parts together before soldering. that will keep them together much longer. try not to "gimme 5" solder wherever possible.
    -get a decent soldering iron where you can set temperature.
    -use shrink tubing where possible.
    -try not to cut excess wire after soldering, as corrosion will begin right there.

    -i hope you are talking about electronics soldering. otherwise please ignore me.
     
  4. uao85

    uao85 1/2 ton status

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    Just make sure you have plenty of this gel called flux, I am pretty sure you can get it at any craft store in the soldering section. When you put it on the wires you are begining to solder, as soon as the heat touches the gel, it instantly boils and draws in the soldier throughout the wired connection, and comes out clean and no bellies hanging off, then as it cools, just slide the shrink tubing over the soldered area, make sure it shrinks completely and voila!!! I have done several wiring harnesses through this method and IMO is the only way to go.

    Remington
     
  5. zeroz400

    zeroz400 1/2 ton status

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    I tin the tip and put the iron under the wires im soldering. Let it heat up a bit and then just dab my solder into it, the wires will suck it up. A few dabs is all you need, dont need those big booger solder connections. Just enough so all the copper is covered in the solder, test it by ripping it apart. I can yank as hard as i can and the solder joint wont tear apart.

    For irons i prefer the pencil type. They're smaller and can get into tight spaces better. Ive used something similar to this one http://www.specialized.net/ecommerce/shop/layout.asp?product%5Fid=720X150 That one is actually nicer then ones ive used becuase it's self igniting, the adjustable heat is nice too.

    Oh yeah, clean the tip when your done! I just use a rag but 86k5 suggestion of a moist sponge is prolly better.
     
  6. hack500

    hack500 1/2 ton status

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    from my learning... heat up the component lead with the iron then touch the solder to it. when dealing with sensitive electronics such as transistors, diodes, IC's too much heat will cause internal damage in most situations a small pair of pliers can be used as a heatsink. Also, too much heat can cause the pads of PCB's to lift from the sub material. keep the tip clean and tinned and you'll be less likely to have a connection fail due to contaminated solder.

    practice, practice, and more practice.
     
  7. Russell

    Russell LB7 Tahoe Status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    If I am not working on a PCB, and just joining wires together, I use a small butane torch flame. It heats the wire up way faster, and seems to work better if you are using flux.

    When doing a PCB, I've got a tip for the butane torch, and as mentioned above, use a pair of pliers as a heat sink to keep from damaging a component due to excessive heat.

    I also use an extremely thin solder that has a lower melting point so it will melt and solder the two peices together quickly, then cool off quickly as well.
     

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