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Some axle confusion...

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by CamaroZ85, Mar 1, 2003.

  1. CamaroZ85

    CamaroZ85 Registered Member

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    Are the Dana 44 and Dana 60 rears only for the front?? Or can you get them for the back as well? I see everyone talking about a 14bff rear as the toughest out there to put in the back, is this a Dana rear or a GM corporate rear?? What is the diff between a sff and bff rear? I've searched and come up with the fact that the bff has external "hub" type setups out back, but what exactly does that allow for?? Thanks for your help! I'm a definite noob to the truck world!
     
  2. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    The Dana 44 and Dana 60 are front axles and rear axles. However, in the GM vehicles that are discussed on here, they are only found in front applications. 44's were used in the back of many jeeps, and other vehicles. 60's can be found in the rear of Ford vans and trucks. They can be swapped into the back of our vehicles, but it's not as desireable of a swap as the 14 bolt. Yes, the 14 bolt is a GM axle. It appears you know how to identify the 14 bolt semi-floating and full-floating. The practical difference: in a semi-floating axle, the axle shafts themselves drive the tires and support the weight of the vehicle through the bearings. For full floating axles, the axleshafts purely drive the tires. The tires and wheels are on a hub with wheel bearings (like the front axle) and therefore the housing of the axle supports the weight of the vehicle/load.
     
  3. CamaroZ85

    CamaroZ85 Registered Member

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    Thanks for the quick and thorough reply!!! Is there any difference in the strength between the 14bff and sf rear? Just going on pure assumption, but to me the ff rear would be stronger since the axle itself doesnt have to support the weigh of the truck.
     
  4. BowtieRed

    BowtieRed 1/2 ton status Author

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    correct- the 14FF is rated at 1ton, and the 14SF 3/4ton.
     
  5. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    You are correct...the FF is stronger than the SF for that reason, and one more reason. The way the axles are held in the housings in semi-floating axles is by a c-clip. This goes in a grove at the end of the axleshaft where it goes into the differential case. This is a spot known to wear from use, thus weakening it and eventually breaking - usually when you see pics of a rig on the side of a trail and the tire is 1 foot away from the side of the vehicle and the axle is still attached, the c-clip area of the axle shaft is broken. Also, there are many other differences that contribute to the semi-floaters weaker strength, including a smaller ring gear and pretty much a totally different carrier design/construction.
     
  6. CamaroZ85

    CamaroZ85 Registered Member

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    Ok, I just want to clear one more thing up. If I'm walking through the bone yard, and I see a "rear" rear with the "hubs" coming out, is that 100% positively gonna be the 14bff?? Or is there something else I need to positvely identify it? BTW Thanks for all of your help!
     
  7. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Well, that could be a rear dana 60 from a ford. Those are FF too so they have the hub sticking out as well. You'll have to look at the differential housing - if the one you see looks like [​IMG] , you know you've found a 14 bolt FF.
     
  8. Lazydog

    Lazydog 1/2 ton status

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    I have a question about the van 14 bolt FF axles. I called a guy who has a van to part out. He measured the rear he says has a 14 bolt FF rear. It measured at 56". Thats the same width as the 12 bolt I have in my Jimmy now. The front D44 in my truck measured 61". Is there more than one width of 14 bolt FF in vans? I was thinking that the guy was confused about the type of axle he has. Let me know. Thanks
     
  9. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    All the van 14 bolts that I've heard of are 3" wider than the truck versions. (They will match the track width of the front) So, I don't know what that guy's talking about - maybe he knows something that I don't. /forums/images/graemlins/confused.gif /forums/images/graemlins/smirk.gif
     
  10. 89GMCSuburban

    89GMCSuburban 1/2 ton status

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    Not all Semi-floater axles are held in by c-clips, some have pressed on bearings on the axleshafts and the bearing housing bolts to the axle tubes. Perfect examples, Dana 35,44 rears and the Ford 9". The Dana 35C is a c-clip axle, as designated by the C.
     
  11. K5MONSTERCHEV

    K5MONSTERCHEV 1/2 ton status

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    My buddy has a Hudson and the axles are held in place by a woodruff key.
     
  12. 4X4HIGH

    4X4HIGH 1 ton status Premium Member GMOTM Winner

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    I think you might be getting confused by the fact that the flange of the axle is attached to the axle by means of a woodruff key on a tapered axle. Those axles are two piece design.
     
  13. R72K5

    R72K5 Banned

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    true for most 73-up althoguh some 1 ton 73-up were 60 FF liek in the dually c30 pickups 3+3 cabs, etc

    72 and older a TON of gm trucks were 60 ff rear especially with BB engine- and alot of gmc 1/2 ton through at least 68 were D44 rear, talk to gmcpaul over in indiana about that he has a 67 gmc 2wd pickup with 44 rear i saw that personally, gmc were a little different thne chevy back then and there is very little factory options paperwork to find for gmc

    73-up is a whole new ballgame as far as axles in the rear
    good luck
     
  14. imiceman44

    imiceman44 1 ton status

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    [ QUOTE ]
    true for most 73-up althoguh some 1 ton 73-up were 60 FF liek in the dually c30 pickups 3+3 cabs, etc

    72 and older a TON of gm trucks were 60 ff rear especially with BB engine- and alot of gmc 1/2 ton through at least 68 were D44 rear, talk to gmcpaul over in indiana about that he has a 67 gmc 2wd pickup with 44 rear i saw that personally, gmc were a little different thne chevy back then and there is very little factory options paperwork to find for gmc

    73-up is a whole new ballgame as far as axles in the rear
    good luck

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Actually in the dually rear it's a D70, which looks liek a D60 only bigger.
     

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