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splitting wood

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by skelly1, May 5, 2006.

  1. skelly1

    skelly1 1/2 ton status

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    How long after you cut a tree down do you have to split the wood? I have 1 week old Eucalyptus and my trusty chainsaw needs a part I can't get by tomorrow when I rented a log splitter. If I wait a couple weeks to start the splitting, am I going to be able to get the job done?
     
  2. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    ya you want to wait, dry wood is eaiser to split
     
  3. skelly1

    skelly1 1/2 ton status

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    My redneck bro told me otherwise. Not that he knows everything, he just said we need to do the splitting ASAP.:confused:
     
  4. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    i think different wods could be different
    but splitting new oak is hard, and 2 weeks later it was still hard, but not as hard
     
  5. Skigirl

    Skigirl 1/2 ton status

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    With a splitter it won't matter how wet or dry the stuff is. The slpitter will go right thru it no problem

    But for purposes of discussion, I agree with Dale - drier is better. Tho eucalytpus is tough stuff wet or dry. I'm gonna split a few cords mid month that have been drying for 16 months. I've split a few by hand along the way, and it was easier the drier it got. Had some oak and some pine. Pine's pretty soft wet or dry. Oak was more difficult.
     
  6. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    i split 5 cords of oak by hand
    took me a week of after school work to do it
    15lb sledge and some wedges was all i had
    dad paid me 2 bucks to split and stack it all
     
  7. JIM88K5

    JIM88K5 1/2 ton status

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    You got ripped...:eek:
     
  8. Resurrection_Joe

    Resurrection_Joe 1 ton status

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    Did you do it uphill and in the snow?

    Damn, all I did for my dad back in the day was catch and castrate 100 pound pigs.....

    Hmmm.....
     
  9. cbbr

    cbbr 1 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Did you have to use a 15lb sledge hammer and a wedge? I'm thinking that it would raise the level of difficulty and make it a real challenge.
     
  10. Can Can

    Can Can Pusher Man Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Your brother's full of crap, unless eucalyptus is special somehow. I normally let my firewood dry out for AT LEAST a season before I bother trying to split it. FWIW, I go through 2-3 cords of fir, larch, and spruce a year.
     
  11. Thunder

    Thunder 3/4 ton status

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    I always let my wood season before I try to split it. But If you are using a splitter it really does not matter.

    Hey Dale! I'll PM ya later when I get readdy to start splittin my wood pile. I'll pay you double what your father paid you.
     
  12. broc944

    broc944 1/2 ton status

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    I burn wood, split it by hand. I split it as soon as the tree gets cut up, I have nothing to add to this post.

    I had a friend tell me once that you are not a real man until you split black oak. (this has nothing to do with trees by the way).
     
  13. surpip

    surpip 1 ton status

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    having since found out the my time is worth more than that, and also found out the fact that i hate splitting wood, i am going to have to decline


    no i did not have to use a 15 pound sledge, it was that or the shorty 2 pound one, all we had.
     
  14. Corey 78K5

    Corey 78K5 1 ton status

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    No his brother is right. eucalyptus pretty much needs to be split when it's first felled. Otherwise the grain twist real bad as it dries and it turns into a rock. Eucalyptus is kinda in a category of its own when it comes to fire wood.
     
  15. afroman006

    afroman006 1/2 ton status

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    I LOVE the way eucalyptus smells when it burns. The last time I smelled it was about 3 years ago when we drove to California from south Texas., and I still distinctly remember it. We dont have and eucalyptus trees around here at all, which now that I think about it is kinda odd. I guess I'll have to settle for my mesquite.
     
  16. Skigirl

    Skigirl 1/2 ton status

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    Note to self: Always have somebody else split eucalyptus wood.
     
  17. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    some splits better green...

    Not sure about Eucalyptus,but I know firsthand you'll be better off splitting Black Locust or Red Oak as soon as you fell the tree..Black Locust petrifies after it dries out,and is so hard sparks will fly off your chain or axe once uts dry.. !..Red Oak and Black Locust also gets all knarly and stringy too,and both can even be difficult to split with a gas log splitter..the "strings" hold the peices together..

    Another wood here called "hornbeam" can be nasty to cut and split,but burns great ,and slowly..like oak..

    I once had some white birch trees I tried to burn in a brush pile about 6" in diameter..Birch usually burns like gunpowder after it dries,only flares up fast and furious for a few moments,and its gone..so I decided to just cut them down and burn them in the brush pile,rather than use them for firewood..(they rot fast too,and get mushy)....well,they only got blackened and scorched about 1/2" deep!..when I tried to cut them with my chainsaw,sparks flew like I was cutting steel!..and I could hardly dent it with an axe,it was hard as glass!..:eek1: ..
     
  18. skelly1

    skelly1 1/2 ton status

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    Well, my note to myself after splitting 3 chords today is that it sucks to split wood, even with a log splitter and a good performing chainsaw. I'm beat. Tomorrow I've another chord or so to go. Next time I buy it split. FWIW, the wife paid 40 bucks for 4 chords of just cut euc and it was a hundred bucks to rent the splitter. I had to spend 30 bucks on my chainsaw to get it going again. It split ok, just time consuming and tough on my back. Some of the logs were 3 + feet across so it was a task. I'm glad this weekend is almost over, can't wait to go back to "work" on Monday.
     

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