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Spring question **** REALLY INTERESTING****

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by milspecjimmy, Feb 3, 2003.

  1. milspecjimmy

    milspecjimmy 1/2 ton status

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    will a rough country rear 4" lift spring fit on the front? and if so what will i get for lift?
     
  2. heavy4x4

    heavy4x4 1/2 ton status

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    Start here - just covered a little while ago.....

    That's going to get you an insane amount of lift. The front 4" Rough Country lift spring has a free-arch of 3.48" That means - draw a straight line through the spring eyes and measure down to the center pin, and your tape measure will read 3.48". So, in your mind, just imagine what a rear spring would have - especially a 4" lift rear spring. Not saying it would be impossible, but it would take a fair amount of work. Good luck /forums/images/graemlins/thumb.gif
     
  3. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    Yeah, it'll fit. -Kinda-

    I started with stock rear 52" springs swapped up front, then modified that spring pack (mixed and matched, cut some leafs and removed some all-togather). Which netted aprox. a 4" lift. That pack worked out pretty well, but there was more travel to be had.

    Trail and Error (ALOT of tral and error)led to useing the main-leaf from a 4" lift rear spring pack. Then swapped in leaf springs from the rear of a S10 Blazer for the rest of the pack. I basicaly just kept swapping leaf springs around until I got it to where I liked it. As a matter of-fact, the very lower leaf is off my '67 camaro. This ended up to be aprox. a 4" lift.
    The shackle mount is in the stock location, but the shackle is now 5.25" long. At ride-height, the shackle kicks-back at about a 45 deg. angle.
    The front mount has been moved forward, all-most to the very-edge of the frame.
    The front spring eye bushing is from a normal 4" lift front spring.
    The rear spring-eye bushing is a stock-replacement urathane type, the shackle has a 1/4" steel washers welded in-place to make up for the thinner bushings used.

    The "new" modified pack has a free-arch of about 3.5", yet it's very softly sprung, due to the thinner leafs that are used (1/4" thick, or there about...).
    The thing flexes like mad, but feels like its stiff enough to keep it from botming out and it feels like it's lateraly stable. All-though, it's torn down again and has yet to be driven.

    Well... thats about it.
     
  4. milspecjimmy

    milspecjimmy 1/2 ton status

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    why i am wondering is because i some day want to put an echibot shackel flip in the rear, and match the front to it, but i cant seem to find an 8" or 9" front spring
     
  5. zcarczar

    zcarczar 1/2 ton status

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    Go with custom springs.
     
  6. Twiz

    Twiz 1/2 ton status

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    The great thing about useing leafs-springs is that they are extreamly avalible, fairly-cheep, and you can make them do just about anything.
    I all-ready had the 4" pack, tripped across the S10 pack from a Body-Shop, and just swipped the camaro leaf from my own ride. Total cost - nothing. (except for the time invested)

    Allthough, there is a Safety concern, anytime you mess around with the main connecting link that holds the axle under the truck, attation should be paid to insure the axle stays in position. (with the front suspension, where extream sheering loads are to-be expected. Safety should be the most important goal)
     

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