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stall converter questions ???

Discussion in '1973-1991 K5 Blazer | Truck | Suburban' started by riz, Apr 2, 2001.

  1. riz

    riz 3/4 ton status

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    <font color=purple> I must admit, I don't know too much about stall converters so I have a couple of questions. Does it basically get your r.p.m.'s up in a higher range before you actually take off ? For example, If my motoor doesn't really kick in until around 2000 r.p.m.'s, then would I want to put in a converter with around 2500 stall ? Is it kind of like putting the power on hold until it's ready to use it, much like holding the brakes while getting on the gas, then when you let off the brakes the power is immediate ? Am I close ? What am I right or wrong about ? Teach me.

    L8r,
    . Riz . <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey>http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey</A>

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  2. riz

    riz 3/4 ton status

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    <font color=purple>Anybody ???

    L8r,
    . Riz . <A target="_blank" HREF=http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey>http://www.geocities.com/rizmonkey</A>

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  3. elkboy

    elkboy 1/2 ton status

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    Stall speed is measured by basicly putting on the brakes and stepping on the gas. The point at which the torque converter locks up enough to stall the motor is the "stall speed". I believe most stck converters are around 2000 RPM. Hope this helps.

    [​IMG]<font color=red> Elkboy</font color=red> [​IMG]
     
  4. Storm Trooper

    Storm Trooper 1/2 ton status GMOTM Winner

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    Riz, yes you basicly have the idea. Back in my old Hot rod days of Detroit when I had my Chevelles with automatics I used stall converters. It's just like holding your foot on the clutch and not letting it out until the approx. rpm.
    They never quite responded to the rpm that was stated but close. The problem I see with an off-road truck having too high of a stall and big tires is that it could get you i trouble when you need to go slow or will be really hard on your drive train with big tires. I wouldn't try to go so high. My big block SS acutally ripped the shocks out of the body once.
    If I had an automatic, I would add a moderate stall, a Very stiff shift kit and a top quality trans cooler to mine. Oh and a deep pan. The tight shift is a little neck cracking on the road but is easyer on the tranny and puts the power down quicker. Does that help?????

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    [​IMG]<font color=red>Rid'in High In My K5[​IMG]
     
  5. LA Bogger

    LA Bogger 1/2 ton status

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    Just make sure when choosing your stall speed it is not higher than what you cruise at on the highway. Meaning don't choose a stall con. say 2500rpm and your rpm at 65mph is only 2000. Heat up and burn up your trans...

    Eat More Mud!!!
     
  6. Wheels

    Wheels 1/2 ton status

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    The stall speed for a stock 700R4 is 1654 rpm. the higher the stall, the higher the heat generated, the shorter the tranny life. For 4 wheeling applications, use a good stock stall speed (or as close as you can get) convertor. For strip applications, theres a whole 'nother set of rules.
     
  7. '73 K5

    '73 K5 1/2 ton status

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    The stock stall speed in most trannys is quite a ways below 2000 RPM. And yes its mainly a drag racing thing. If you have a really lopey cam that doesn't start its powerband until 3000 RPM, then it'll help if you bump up the stall speed. On a 4x4 that spends its life crawling around on trails, you will want the lowest stall speed possible...because an aggresive cam is also kind of a negative thing for crawling. If your offroad usage is blasting through mudpits, then the cam/stall thing would make more sense.

    '73 K5
    Chevy good...Ford bad
     
  8. CaptCrunch

    CaptCrunch 1/2 ton status

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    yeah basically you need a converter that matches your engine torque range... not sure if you have a lockup one, but keep in mind almost all aftermarkets aren't so that is gonna make some tremendous heat. Definetly get the biggest cooler you can. Also that heat is gonna cause a loss of gas milage. I doubt if you'd need anything more then a Vette converter which stalls in the 1800 to 2200 range I believe... I think the rule of thumb is converter should be rated like 200 or 500 below your torque peak... but if your engine is making good power down low like it should then you don't need one... hi-perf guys usually have engines making power in the upper rpm's so that is why they change converters

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    1987 Chevy K5 Blazer- 350 TBI
     

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