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Steel Garage, your experience or opinion?

Discussion in 'The Garage' started by BigBurban350, Jun 8, 2006.

  1. BigBurban350

    BigBurban350 1/2 ton status

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    Just wondering how I can get a 2 car garage if I buy a house without a garage. I have no idea about how long they last and if most city codes would allow one. Anybody have experience with this type of building?

    Northern Tools 2-car garage kit
    If I can get it a little longer

    I can't spend $20,000 on a garage with foundation, since I will probably be moving out in 3-5 years, but my life revolves around things that would not be acceptable in a house (ex. Welder, Tool Box, Chop saw, Grease, K5s....)
     
  2. WhiteBurb

    WhiteBurb 1/2 ton status

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    My dad has a steel garage. I think it is 24' x 30', and with the foundation, slab and installation it set him back around 6k.
    Its pretty nice overall. We just had to add some insulation to keep it bearable in there.
    The walk-in door it came with was kind of cheesy though, like a mobile home door.
     
  3. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    I'm satisfied...

    I have a Quonest style steel garage from Steelmaster Buildings..it was the cheapest way for me to get a garage,and not spend every last dime I had in my savings..its much sturdier than the usual steel buildings--it has no "frame",its just arched panels stamped with ribs to strengthen it ..it was fairly easy to erect too..just bolts together!.

    I had looked into many other buildings like "Miracle Truss",and a local company's "Space" metal buildings only a few miles down the street..they were much more expensive,and had no real advantage over the quonset style..so for just over 4 grand,I got a 20x40 foot garage,with a 13' ceiling with no rafters to get in the way of a lift or a truck with a camper on it--where as all the others would have costed over 12 grand for a comparable sized building..(1992 prices!--I'm sure its more now,but steel is still cheaper than wood,and wont burn!)...

    Be careful what you buy!..some of those steel garages are just oversized versions of those sheds they sell at home depot,etc,that are thin as tin foil,and have frames that are only 16 gauge steel...not very rugged at all!..

    "Dontoe" on here has a similar building to mine he just built!!--maybe searching his posts will bring up some of the pctures he posted,and give you an idea of what a quonset will look like..they come with gable style roofs now too,not just the "round top" like mine is..:crazy:
     
  4. Emmettology 101

    Emmettology 101 3/4 ton status

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    We used to have a 70x120 steel "garage".. They are nice and last a long time.. The Northern models may be of a less quality.. I'd try and find someone who has one before you buy one...

    The steel buildings are colder in the winter.
     
  5. Pookster

    Pookster 1/2 ton status

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    cold in winter. scorching in summer. Loud when it rains.

    Working under cover and being to start where you left off- priceless.
     
  6. Metrodps

    Metrodps Strange but nice guy Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    My father when he was in business had an 80'x40' pole barn (sheet metal on wood frame) and that was in 1979 it is still standing today. I know they put a new roof on it a few years back due to nails leaking but it still looks good.

    BTW it was in N.W. Ohio

    We put insulation on inside and put Styrofoam to rafters. It also had an office and bathroom we heated those by electric and used salamanders in big areas while we worked inside. You do not need to put a slab down so you can use stone(#6 real fine) but I would consider at least having the option of it. You can rent the floats and do it your self it is not that hard. Email me if you have questions.


    Whis I had one now..... :(
     
  7. BigBurban350

    BigBurban350 1/2 ton status

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    Can't PM ya, i'm a cheap bass tard. I was talking with a buddy, he said you basically rent a trencher and trench the size of the garage for the anchor, as you would fill it with concrete. Then fill in the middle. What kind of stone? Is that safe to hold up cars on jackstands?
     
  8. diesel4me

    diesel4me 1 ton status Premium Member

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    Pole barns..

    Pole buildings are a cheap way to get a roomy garage too..and no foundation to dig or pour..my friends dad built a huge pole barn for a workshop and hay storage by burying 3" galvanized schedule 40 pipe 12' high,in 5 gallon pails filled with cement 3 feet deep, to get below the frost line,and bolted 2x6 boards across the pipes lengthwise,to allow board and batten siding boards to be nailed on..(or plywood,metal sheeting,etc...)he used trusses for the roof,but a "shed" roof is easier to make..It has stood for 30+ years and has survived many 3' blizzards and hurricane force winds..

    His floor was simply packed dirt for a long time,until he got the cash to buy cement and a mixer,and he poured sections at a time by hand,until the shop area was done..personally,I'd have had a Redi-Mix truck come and pour it all at once,its much less work,and a better end result..but he was old school,and liked hard work I guess..

    He used "soil cememt" in the barn area where his tractors,hay,and horses were kept..its nothing more than Portland cement spread over the hard packed soil,and wetted down good with a lawn sprinkler!..you'd think it would be weak and crack all to hell,but we split a few John Deere's in half to do clutches on them,and the jack stands showed no sign of sinking into the floor,without any wood under them!...he made a driveway to the barn the same way..

    If you have access to a post hole digger on a tractor,its a very inexpensive way to make a strong building..here in my area a regular concrete foundation was a bit cheaper,since few contractors here had a post hole digger,and those who did charged 100 bucks a hole!..(that may be different now,with all the Bobcats around with them nowadays)..I imagine out in the midwest it would be much cheaper,since more farmers have tractors,and post hole diggers are common for fence installation,etc..if I didnt buy a Quonset garage,I'd probably have a pole building instead...:crazy:
     
  9. Metrodps

    Metrodps Strange but nice guy Premium Member GMOTM Winner Author

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    If you call a stone quarry or hauling company it is called #6 (screening) it is a finer grind of stones and has a gravel the size of peas and peanuts that packs down pretty good. We had a small quonset hut that had stone and we put wood under tires and also any jack stand. As for the building it was 6 x 6 treated post with 2 x 4 braces on sides to attach metal it to used prefab trusses. They also put some kinda rat board up 3 feet at bottom. they poured footers and we did the floor. It was poured in section so as to be flexible (20' x 40'). You also need expansion joint between sections. We used a black fiber material.

    You can click on the posters name and then it has a link to email them.
     

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